Rise of the Drones
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Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
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FAA Unveils Drone Rules: Autonomy Is In, Drone Delivery Is Out - IEEE Spectrum

FAA Unveils Drone Rules: Autonomy Is In, Drone Delivery Is Out - IEEE Spectrum | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
The proposed rules are surprisingly reasonable, but there are things that need work

. . . 

One thing that is not addressed here is autonomy: can commercial drones fly themselves? The FAA rules are clearly based around human operators, but the FAA’s UAS FAQ also says that an unmanned aircraft can be flown by “a pilot via a ground control system, or autonomously through use of an on-board computer, communication links and any additional equipment that is necessary for the UA to operate safely.”

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Christopher Korody's curator insight, February 27, 9:56 AM

The most complete summary of the rules out there this side of the 195 page FAA document. Great reference!

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With FAA readying new rules, journalists aren't part of Drone Nation (yet)

With FAA readying new rules, journalists aren't part of Drone Nation (yet) | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The FAA disagreed. FAA spokesperson Les Dorr told news media that “if you’re using it for commercial purposes, including journalism, that’s not allowed.”

 

VentureBeat asked another FAA representative, Alison Duquette, if noncommercial journalism, such as public television or an amateur blogger, would also be banned. She replied that “public TV would be included” in the ban, and she added that “most people would consider a blog as journalism,” so apparently it’s not the money-making part that’s offensive to the agency.

This ambiguity is not unexpected, since the FAA is rushing to catch up with this Wild West of technology, ready for pioneers but with no clear boundaries. On the way toward governance, the FAA has to zip around many possible safety, privacy and noise issues that could result from even a limited number of drones let loose into American airspace.

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Veterans For Peace to submit petition to ban drones

Veterans For Peace to submit petition to ban drones vtdigger.org Each of the signatories agreed with the petition statement requesting our congressional delegation to introduce or join in legislation to ban the use of armed drones by the CIA and the U.S. Military.

 

The petition presents the findings of the UK based Bureau of Investigative Journalism, published in January, 2013, which reports that in Pakistan, Yemen, and Somalia between 3,061 and 4,731 people have been killed by drones of which 558 to 1,126 were civilians. Four US citizens have also been killed three of whom were civilians.

 

Also included in the petition are the findings of a joint study conducted by Stanford University School of Law and the New York University Law School which concluded that drone strikes are not “surgically precise” as the government claims but, in fact, kill innocent people, terrorize civilians and facilitate the recruitment of non-state armed groups to conduct violent attacks.

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Journalist Sues Police for Doubting His Right to Fly Drones

Journalist Sues Police for Doubting His Right to Fly Drones | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

A drone journalist is suing a local police department in a case that may provide a stepping stone to broader legislation dealing with who has the right to fly drones and take video from the sky.

Pedro Rivera filed a suit against two officers of the Hartford, Conn., police department on Feb. 18 after they convinced his part-time employer, a local TV station, to suspend him for a week that began on Feb. 3. The suspension followed a department investigation into whether Rivera illegally used his drone to film the scene of a fatal accident.

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Why Drone Delivery Will Be A Nightmare For Law Enforcement

Why Drone Delivery Will Be A Nightmare For Law Enforcement | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Amazon 'Prime Air' could be the first step toward a postal service free of surveillance.

 

Amazon's Jeff Bezos [went] on 6o Minutes Sunday night and reveal[ed] a “secret R&D project: The beginning of Silk Air Road? ‘Octocopter’ drones that will fly packages directly to your doorstep in 30 minutes.” Yup. an autonomous drone delivery service that would use GPS coordinates to navigate, called Amazon “Prime Air.”

 

After the shock and awe wore off, many commentators immediately pointed out that this is currently illegal. While the po-po and government entities are allowed to fly drones if they obtain authorization from the FAA, private use of drones is limited to hobbyists, and they have to keep the drones under 400

feet and within their line of sight. But that’s just a temporary hang-up. Congress has ordered the FAA to clear the skyway for commercial use of drones by 2015. So, yes, Amazon will be able to get emergency diapers, toilet paper, or s-pound gummy bears (depending on the Octocopter’s weight limits) to you in 30 minutes (and Google will be able to launch ‘Drone Map’, and Facebook will be able to launch ‘Drone Stalk’, and on and on).

 

Law enforcement may already be gritting its teeth over the idea of legal drone delivery though. Being

able to send things by drone could be hugely disruptive to the existing mail system: a peer-to-peer postal service that cuts out the USPS and FedEx. That’s fine when Amazon is shipping out books, but what about the kind of deliveries that law enforcement wants to be able to track? The existing

postal system is full of surveillance.

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FAA Grounds Local Aerial Photo Business - CBS Minnesota

FAA Grounds Local Aerial Photo Business - CBS Minnesota | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Charles Eide and Mike Danielson have been flying radio controlled aircraft since they little kids growing up in the same neighborhood.

 

By mounting stabilized cameras onto the bellies of the drone aircraft, Eide and Danielson can offer customers a bird’s-eye view of anything from construction sites, to city attractions, to real estate listings.

 

“It helps sell houses, which is really in my opinion a huge economic impact in the Twin Cities — helps houses move faster,” Eide said.

 

Business was booming, until a call came from the Minneapolis office of the Federal Aviation Administration. They were simply told to ground their commercial use of the aircraft. Turns out, current regulations don’t allow unmanned aircraft for commercial purposes.

 

Business was booming, until a call came from the Minneapolis office of the Federal Aviation Administration. They were simply told to ground their commercial use of the aircraft. Turns out, current regulations don’t allow unmanned aircraft for commercial purposes.

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