Rise of the Drones
Follow
4.5K views | +0 today
Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Journalist Sues Police for Doubting His Right to Fly Drones

Journalist Sues Police for Doubting His Right to Fly Drones | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

A drone journalist is suing a local police department in a case that may provide a stepping stone to broader legislation dealing with who has the right to fly drones and take video from the sky.

Pedro Rivera filed a suit against two officers of the Hartford, Conn., police department on Feb. 18 after they convinced his part-time employer, a local TV station, to suspend him for a week that began on Feb. 3. The suspension followed a department investigation into whether Rivera illegally used his drone to film the scene of a fatal accident.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

In Thailand, a Drone's Eye View of Protests

In Thailand, a Drone's Eye View of Protests | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
For the first time, widespread use of the tiny devices give an aerial perspective on Thailand’s deep civil unrest.

 

Thailand’s news media outlets have been increasingly using small, unmanned flying gadgets that give them a bird’s-eye view of the protests in the streets of their capital. As my colleague Thomas Fuller writes, the miniature drones have circulated videos of the battles, including one between riot police outside the prime minister’s office and protesters attacking the barricades.

 

This is the first time that drones have been used so widely during protests in Thailand, which is now in the throes of its deepest civil unrest in three years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Drone journalism takes off

Drone journalism takes off | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

As the media starts to deploy small toy-like drones to cover stories, what ethical and safety issues are arising?


Drone Journalism Lab founder Matt Waite said: "What are the property rights over your home? Am I trespassing by flying over your house? Beyond questions of personal privacy, another issue raised is the free speech issues raised by drones. For instance if there is a bad chemical spill... and police close the area down to keep people away... can I fly a drone over it and get a look? What if police close the airspace? Where is the line between the public's right to know about something versus the state's want for security?" (...)


"I understand people being uncomfortable with the faceless 'capital M' media getting flying robots with cameras. It's a similar concern as police getting the same: eyes in the skies, watching all the time." (...)


The assocation doesn't have a problem with the concept of responsible drone journalism and Ms Mactavish laughs off concerns over the potential for a greater invasion of privacy. "You've got to keep this in perspective - they won't be doing anything new. Google Earth can look right down into your backyard. Satellites have been doing this for 20 years. "They've arrived... Now it's all about safe and ethical deployment."


By Mark Corcoran from Foreign Correspondent

ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Feb 21, 2012



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

With FAA readying new rules, journalists aren't part of Drone Nation (yet)

With FAA readying new rules, journalists aren't part of Drone Nation (yet) | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The FAA disagreed. FAA spokesperson Les Dorr told news media that “if you’re using it for commercial purposes, including journalism, that’s not allowed.”

 

VentureBeat asked another FAA representative, Alison Duquette, if noncommercial journalism, such as public television or an amateur blogger, would also be banned. She replied that “public TV would be included” in the ban, and she added that “most people would consider a blog as journalism,” so apparently it’s not the money-making part that’s offensive to the agency.

This ambiguity is not unexpected, since the FAA is rushing to catch up with this Wild West of technology, ready for pioneers but with no clear boundaries. On the way toward governance, the FAA has to zip around many possible safety, privacy and noise issues that could result from even a limited number of drones let loose into American airspace.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Drones To Fly In Nebraska Skies

Drones To Fly In Nebraska Skies | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

In his third floor office at the College of Journalism and Mass Communication on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln campus, Professor Matt Waite showed off his latest gadget.


As he picked up a remote resembling a controller for a video game, Waite said “What this thing will teach you, beyond humility, is to keep nice and steady and stable.”


This thing is an unmanned aerial vehicle, also called a UAV or drone. (...)


Waite said giving journalists the ability to deploy drones at a moment’s notice will lead to the future of journalism.


According to Waite, drones will allow better coverage of all types of stories, from severe weather coverage to county fairs. He cautioned, though, you shouldn’t plan on seeing your local news station flying drones around your area just yet.


By Ryan Robertson, NET News

10 Jan 2013

more...
No comment yet.