Rise of the Drones
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Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
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Businesses see oppurtunity in civilian drones, but regulations stand in the way

Businesses see oppurtunity in civilian drones, but regulations stand in the way | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

For every year that integration of drones is delayed, the U.S. economy will lose more than $10 billion in potential economic impact, or $27.6 million a day, according to the study.

 

"It's like any other technology boom — GPS, the Internet," said Melanie Hinton, spokeswoman at the trade group. "I think as soon as people start seeing the positive effects, the growth in economics, how it will help people do their jobs safer and more efficiently, that it will go mainstream."

 

Among the 50 states, experts believe, California has the most to gain in economic benefit from the opening of the national air space for drones. Washington state is second and Texas third.

 

In the first three years, according to the trade association study, the Golden State would see $2.4 billion in increased economic activity, with more than 12,000 new jobs created. Over a decade, the economic activity would increase to $14.4 billion, including more than 18,000 new jobs.

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Wildlife Margrit's curator insight, July 3, 2013 2:07 PM

These drones/UAVs are proving absolutely essential in the right to save the African rhino from sophisticated crime syndicate wildlife poachers

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Anticipating domestic boom, colleges rev up drone piloting programs

Anticipating domestic boom, colleges rev up drone piloting programs | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Randal Franzen was 53, unemployed and nearly broke when his brother, a tool designer at Boeing, mentioned that pilots for remotely piloted aircraft – more commonly known as drones – were in high demand. (...)


While most jobs flying drones currently are military-related, universities and colleges expect that to change by 2015, when the Federal Aviation Administration is due to release regulations for unmanned aircraft in domestic airspace. Once those regulations are in place, the FAA predicts that 10,000 commercial drones will be operating in the U.S. within five years.


Although just three schools currently offer degrees in piloting unmanned aircraft, many others – including community colleges – offer training for remote pilots. And those numbers figure are set to increase, with some aviation industry analysts predicting drones will eventually come to dominate the U.S. skies in terms of jobs.  

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Kev Bauer's curator insight, March 21, 2013 7:12 PM

new fields being created, not just military. what could be future industries/jobs related to drones?