Rise of the Drones
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Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
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SEE IT: Bolivian inventor makes drones out of recycled materials

SEE IT: Bolivian inventor makes drones out of recycled materials | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Bolivian inventor makes drones out of recycled materials and thinks these inexpensive drones would make the technology available to the public in Bolivia and be used for aerial crop management and connecting isolated communities to the Internet.

ddrrnt's insight:

Could drones built from e-waste make a difference in the slums?

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UAS Attracting Interest From New Users but Still Prompt Worries, Speakers Say

UAS Attracting Interest From New Users but Still Prompt Worries, Speakers Say | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

AUVSI President and CEO Michael Toscano appeared alongside MIT's Missy Cummings to discuss the state of the technology. Integrating unmanned aircraft into the National Airspace System will create more than 100,000 jobs, particularly in agriculture, Toscano said, and Cummings said the issue with integration is now more about psychological than technological barriers.

A commercial revolution will take place in agriculture, Cummings said, and the United States is already behind.

"Japan basically does all its crop dusting with UAVs. An entire country," Cummings said.

She predicted that another revolution, that of unmanned cargo delivery, is already taking shape in Afghanistan in the form of the K-Max unmanned helicopter, which now supplies cargo to deployed soldiers and Marines. 

....

Another ongoing and growing use of unmanned aircraft is for monitoring wildlife, their habitats and the poachers who are killing some of them in record numbers, said Carter Roberts, the president and CEO of the World Wildlife Fund.

Groups like the WWF simply don't always have good information about what's happening on the ground in remote locations and have started using UAS to track animals, discover poachers and then follow them back to their traders.

Privacy issues rarely come into play, because the areas are so remote and the systems help give a small technological edge against the poachers, who are better funded and better equipped, the said.

"We do not want to document the demise of nature," but instead use these systems to get real-time information into the hands of governments who can help the wildlife, Roberts said. 

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Swimming robot reaches Australia

Swimming robot reaches Australia | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
A marine robot has completed a record-breaking 9,000 nautical mile (16,668km) trip across the Pacific Ocean.

BBC
05 Dec 2012
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The robot was gathering data about phytoplankton, both as a food source for other sea life, as well as a carbon sink. It is said to provide greater detail than satellite data.  


The PacX Wave Glider is manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a US based company. 

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Drone images help threatened fish

Drone images help threatened fish | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

A mini helicopter has been used by researchers from Worcester to examine the threat to rare fish species posed by a dam on a Chilean river.


The work was carried out by PhD student Amy Woodget and Dr Ian Maddock, principal lecturer in physical geography at the University of Worcester. (...)


Professor Habit Evelyn Habit, from the University of Concepcion, said the images from the Draganflyer UAS showed the river in "an extraordinarily high level of detail".


"This allows us to better understand the habitat availability for our native fish species," he said.


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Attack of the drones to fight tree rot in Scotland | sUAS News

Attack of the drones to fight tree rot in Scotland | sUAS News | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

DRONES more commonly ­associated with the war on ­terror are to patrol the skies over Scotland in a bid to eradicate diseases that threaten to wipe out swathes of forest.


The unmanned planes are smaller than conventional drones and armed with high resolution cameras to capture images that will help woodland managers spot telltale signs of fatal fungal infections in trees. (...)


“Only the wide application and routine use of this technology directly by forest managers will enable the technology to deliver its potential benefits, cost effectively,” said Ian Thomas, a chartered forester who helped compile the study. “This means every forestry manager having the technology in the boot of their car, and knowing how to use it.”


Read more at the scotsman.com


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Tyler Courtnage's comment, March 5, 5:56 AM
7. Drones, a technology usually used to fight the war on terror, are now being used by foresters. The Drones capture pictures of the woods, which the foresters then study to see if anything is unhealthy with the forest. Recently in Scotland, foresters have detected a deadly fungus on trees that could've wiped out a whole forest. They were able to contain it since it was detected early because of the drones.
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Activist Drone Catches Pigeon Shooters

Activist Drone Catches Pigeon Shooters | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

In Pennsylvania, the thrill of shooting flying clay out of the air isn't enough for everyone. Some gun clubs have organized pigeon shoots, where live pigeons are used instead of clay targets. It's legal there, but controversial. Showing Animals Respect and Kindness (SHARK), an animal advocay group in Pennsylvania, is now using drones to catch pigeon killers.

 

SHARK flies octorotor drones with videos camera attached. Dubbed "Angels" (because subtlety) SHARK's drones have recorded people cleaning up after allegedly shooting pigeons in addition to allegedly disposing of dead pigeons (and burning tires, which is illegal for individuals, as there are health risks).

Why use drones and not just, say, a smartphone cam? Presumably because you can see a lot more when you're buzzing around in the sky.

 

This isn't the first time activists have used drones to support their cause. In Texas in 2012, for instance, a hobbyist's drone outside of Dallas took pictures of a meatpacking plant that was dumping pig blood into a creek.

 

Not everyone approves of these tactics, though. Texas responded to the pig blood incident bypassing a law that makes it illegal for hobbyists to use drones to photograph private property without the consent of the property owner. And in Pennsylvania, someone allegedly responded to one of the SHARK drones by shooting it down.

 

 

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NASA Flies Decommisioned Drones Over Active Volcano, Because Sure, Why Not

NASA Flies Decommisioned Drones Over Active Volcano, Because Sure, Why Not | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

NASA has found a good use for three military UAVs — in this case, Aerovironment RQ-14 Dragon Eye drones — on loan from the U.S. Marine Corps. Equipped with sensors and cameras, the drones were sent on 10 separate flights into the miasma of sulfur dioxide rising up from the crater of the volcano known as Turrialba near San Jose in Costa Rica.

 

The overall hope is that the data collected by the drones will form computer models that can help safeguard airspace systems, improve climate predictions, and minimize the dangers for those who live near volcanoes. Of course, even drones would be useless if a volcano erupted in the middle of Los Angeles.

 

Matthew Fladeland, airborne science manager at NASA’s Ames Research Center, summed things up:

 

“This project is great example of how unmanned aircraft can be used for beneficial civilian purposes — in this case for better understanding Earth system processes and the impact of volcanism on our atmosphere. By taking these retired military tools, we can very efficiently and effectively collect measurements that improve NASA satellite data and aviation safety.”

 

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Brazil’s Homemade Drones

Brazil’s Homemade Drones | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

“It ends up demystifying this equipment, to show that it’s not only restricted for military use but also something of daily use,” says AGX Tecnologia consultant Jen John Lee in the basement of these homey headquarters.


Going against the trend of Latin American nations purchasing Isreali-made drones for drug-war policing and border patrolling, AGX uses only Brazilian technology developed at the nearby University of São Paulo and sees its target market in the nation’s growing agricultural industry and state “environmental police” forces tasked with monitoring illegal extraction of natural resources.


Brazil’s Federal Police is indeed implementing a fleet of Israeli-made UAVs along its porous frontier to monitor drug trafficking. But the São Paulo Environmental Police has other objectives. They will be the first team in the state to regularly employ unarmed UAVs to monitor threats in rural areas, such as deforestation and illegal fishing.


Taylor Barnes | Oct 18, 2011

latintrade.com

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Robot to monitor volcanic eruptions - Video on NBCNews.com

Robot to monitor volcanic eruptions - Video on NBCNews.com | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Video on msnbc.com: Japanese scientists are testing a robot that can fly over a volcano and drop a remote controlled ground vehicle to monitor eruptions. NBCNews.com's Dara Brown reports.



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