Rise of the Drones
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Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
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Scientists develop swarm of ping-pong ball-sized robots

Correll and his computer science research team, including research associate Dustin Reishus and professional research assistant Nick Farrow, have developed a basic robotic building block, which he hopes to reproduce in large quantities to develop increasingly complex systems.

Correll plans to use the droplets to demonstrate self-assembly and swarm-intelligent behaviors such as pattern recognition, sensor-based motion and adaptive shape change. These behaviors could then be transferred to large swarms for water- or air-based tasks.

Correll hopes to create a design methodology for aggregating the droplets into more complex behaviors such as assembling parts of a large space telescope or an aircraft.

Machines Like Us
16 Dec 2012
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UAV Imaging System Produces 3D Models of Historical Monuments | Unmanned Systems Technology

UAV Imaging System Produces 3D Models of Historical Monuments | Unmanned Systems Technology | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The multiple applications of this technology are evident, as they offer an autonomous device that in just some minutes can scan a façade with as much or a higher precision than 3D scanners. It is noteworthy that this device can get close to the object up to a few inches to obtain the smallest and unreachable details.


University uses UAVs to create 3D models of monuments | Geek.com

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Swarm Robots Cooperate with AR Drone

From the great IEEE Spectrum Automaton blog:


We’re used to thinking of robot swarms as consisting of lots and lots of similar robots working together. What we’re starting to see now, though, are swarms of heterogeneous robots, where you get different robots combining their powers to make each other more efficient and more capable. One of the first projects to really make this work was Swarmanoid, with teams of footbots and handbots and eyebots, and researchers presented a similar idea at IROS earlier this month, using an AR Drone to help a swarm of self-assembling ground robots to climb over a hill.


Posted by Chris Anderson at DIYdrones 23Oct12


video: "Spatially Targeted Communication and Self-Assembly," by Nithin Mathews, Anders Lyhne Christensen, Rehan O'Grady, and Marco Dorigo, from Universite Libre de Bruxelles and Instituto Universitario de Lisboa, was presented at IROS 2012 in Vilamoura, Portugal.

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Linux Powers Airborne Bots

Linux Powers Airborne Bots | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Essex University researchers say they've created the world's smallest flying web server using a toy helicopter equipped with an 8-gram gumstix processor. Next up: military applications. By Kevin Poulsen.


The UltraSwarm project is an experiment in swarm intelligence and wireless cluster computing that might one day spawn military surveillance applications. In one scenario, a flock of unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, with video cameras could take in a hostile landscape from a variety of angles and process the image locally, in the sky. (...)


"We'll have a flock of helicopters; they will be autonomous individually and as a swarm, and they will be gathering and processing visual data in distributed way," says Owen Holland, project director and deputy head of the university's computer science department. (...)


In March (2005), Brooklyn-based defense contractor Atair Aerospace announced the first successful demonstration of flocking and swarming techniques in a UAV, after dropping five computer-guided Onyx parafoil gliders in an experiment funded by the U.S. Army. The company says the parafoils can be released from 35,000 feet, autonomously glide as a flock for 30 miles, then land together within 150 feet of a preprogrammed target. The system is designed to air-drop troop supplies with once-unachievable precision.


by Kevin Poulsen 01Jun05 


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Drones Used to Assess Storm Damage on Utility Distribution Systems

Drones Used to Assess Storm Damage on Utility Distribution Systems | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has completed tests determining that unmanned aircraft systems, or drones, can be used effectively to assess storm damage on utility distribution systems.


Conducted at the New Mexico State University Flight Test Center, the tests involved navigating several aircraft technologies and using high resolution video cameras to transmit images of power lines from a height of 5,000 to 7,000 feet. The tests determined that such images can be used by electric utilities to assess damage and pinpoint its location following a storm. (...)

In the wake of a storm, damage assessment is frequently a choke point in power restoration due largely to obstacles, such as downed trees blocking roads or icy conditions that make it extremely difficult for utility crews to get to and report on distribution line damage.

“Our research clearly shows that drones may provide utilities a tool that could reduce outage restoration time,” said Matthew Olearczyk, senior program manager for distribution research at EPRI. “Using live streaming video information, utility system operators would be able to dramatically improve damage assessment.”


via Unmanned Systems Technology

June 6th, 2012




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University uses UAVs to create 3D models of monuments | Geek.com

University uses UAVs to create 3D models of monuments | Geek.com | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Grenada are working hard to create a 3D photography system that takes advantage of the use of unmanned aerial vehicles to render lifelike representations of famous monuments and landmarks.


The researcher’s goal in this project is to be able to automate the process of capturing and cataloging 3D models of famous monuments without any human intervention. Considering the rapid advances in both UAV and 3D technology, the chances are good that they will succeed!


Jun. 11, 2012

By: Ray Walters

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Smart Aid - Defibrillator drone?

Fast Company reports:


A USA Today investigation a few years ago found that, of the 250,000 fatal cardiac arrests that occur outside of U.S. hospitals every year, up to 76,000 cases were treatable. That is, the patients would have survived if the ambulance had got there in time. A quick zap with a defibrillator was all that was needed, but many cities could not promise a response within six minutes--the standard survival window.


The normal reaction to this might be: invest in a better ambulance fleet, more call centers, and so on. But Stefen Riegebauer, a graduate student from Austria, has a different, more futuristic, idea: to build a first aid drone network that gets people and equipment to the scene more quickly.


Riegebauer has built a non-working prototype, his visualizations are pretty funky, and he says the drone technology already exists. A team at MIT recently unveiled an autonomous UVV capable of flying at 22 mph in tight spaces; Riegebauer says it would be ideal.


posted by Chris Anderson at DIYdrones 27Oct12


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