Rise of the Drones
7.1K views | +0 today
Rise of the Drones
Investigating the future of unmanned aerial vehicles.
Curated by ddrrnt
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

A Wearable Concept Camera That ‘Flies’ Off Your Wrist, Takes Your Photo

A Wearable Concept Camera That ‘Flies’ Off Your Wrist, Takes Your Photo | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Instead of fumbling with stick mounts the next time you try to take a solo photo of yourself, perhaps you need a flying camera “drone” to get it done. Meet Nixie, a concept of “the first wearable camera that can fly”, offering users a hands-free photo-taking experience. 

With a flick of your wrist, Nixie, which looks like a tiny drone, detaches itself from your wristband and flies away “past your arms’ reach” to snap your photo before returning to your wrist. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

UAE To Use UAS For Government Services | IncreasingHumanPotential.org

UAE To Use UAS For Government Services | IncreasingHumanPotential.org | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The United Arab Emirates says it plans to use unmanned aerial drones to deliver official documents and packages to its citizens as part of efforts to upgrade government services.

....

“The UAE will try to deliver its government services through drones. This is the first project of its kind in the world,” Mohammed al-Gergawi, a minister of cabinet affairs, said on Monday as he displayed a prototype developed for the government.

....

The UAE drone programme faces similar obstacles, plus temperatures which often exceed 40 degrees Centigrade (104 degrees Fahrenheit) in summer and heavy sandstorms which occasionally sweep across the desert country.
“Within a year from now we will understand the capabilities of the system and what sort of services, and how far we can deliver. Eventually a new product will be launched across all the country,” Gergawi said.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Robot dragonfly DelFly Explorer flies autonomously

Robot dragonfly DelFly Explorer flies autonomously | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

The DelFly Explorer is the first flapping wing Micro Air Vehicle that is able to fly with complete autonomy in unknown environments. Weighing just 20 grams, it is equipped with a 4-gram onboard stereo vision system. 


The DelFly Explorer can perform an autonomous take-off, keep its height, and avoid obstacles for as long as its battery lasts (~9 minutes). All sensing and processing is performed on board, so no human or offboard computer is in the loop.


http://www.delfly.nl/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

First Successful Perching on a Human Hand by a Robotic Bird Airplane (MAV/ UAV)

Micro-sized flying vehicles have all sorts of potential uses from surveillance to communications and, frankly, pure fun, but few of them demonstrate the smarts of a new ornithopter robot from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The flapping bird-like aircraft copies many aerodynamic tricks from real bird flight, and is actually capable of the complicated bunt/braking maneuver birds use when coming to land on a perch. In this case, the bot is shown landing on a human's hand--but in terms of surveillance, it's easy to see a bot like this swooping in on a target's window frame to listen in to what's said inside a room. - via FastCompany


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

US Air Force may be secretly developing next generation of stealth drones

US Air Force may be secretly developing next generation of stealth drones | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
Bill Sweetman (of Aviation Week) reports that Lockheed Martin and Northrup Grumman are behind the new drones, which include a "Next Generation" stealth bomber and UAV reconnaissance plane. None of these plans have been officially disclosed, however, highlighting a significant contrast to the Air Force's public-facing side, which has repeatedly expressed reluctance about incorporating drones as its mainstay. In 2008, then-US Defense Secretary Robert Gates said that trying to get the Air Force to expand its drone armies was "like pulling teeth."

Joshua Kopstein
10 Dec 2012
ddrrnt's insight:

Here's the full story in Aviation Week.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Scientists develop swarm of ping-pong ball-sized robots

Correll and his computer science research team, including research associate Dustin Reishus and professional research assistant Nick Farrow, have developed a basic robotic building block, which he hopes to reproduce in large quantities to develop increasingly complex systems.

Correll plans to use the droplets to demonstrate self-assembly and swarm-intelligent behaviors such as pattern recognition, sensor-based motion and adaptive shape change. These behaviors could then be transferred to large swarms for water- or air-based tasks.

Correll hopes to create a design methodology for aggregating the droplets into more complex behaviors such as assembling parts of a large space telescope or an aircraft.

Machines Like Us
16 Dec 2012
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Precise autonomous payload placement using a UAV with giant robotic arm and low cost depth perception vision

Precise autonomous payload placement using a UAV with giant robotic arm and low cost depth perception vision | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
A DARPA-funded technology demonstration recently finished a successful testing of vision-driven robotic-arm payload emplacement using MLB Company’s tail-sitter UAV, V-Bat. This UAV is capable of both hover and wing-borne flight, making the delivery and precision emplacement of a payload possible. A special robotic arm was designed with the capability of carrying up to 1 pound.

The research team designed and developed a low-cost vision system to estimate the target’s position relative to the hovering vehicle in real time. This vision system enables the UAV to search and find the target for the emplacement autonomously and then perform the action.

DARPA’s precision emplacement technology demonstration paves the way for precise long-range delivery of small payloads into difficult-to-reach environments.
ddrrnt's insight:

UAV's are learning how to pick up and transport things. Who knows, maybe one day they'll pick you up.  Care for a ride?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Dragonfly V3 1080high1

Dragonfly V3 1080high1 | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Researchers at Georgia Tech have created a robotic dragonfly that can hover, dive, and climb like a real insect. With the help of a $1,000,000 grant from the Air Force, the team has built multiple prototypes of the consumer device and is now working on an Indiegogo project to sell the basic dragonfly for $99 and an upgraded version for $179. The ultimate version will cost $399 although they expect it to cost $1,500 retail.


via TechCrunch

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Cooperative Quadrocopter Ball Throwing and Catching

Quadrocopters that can play catch with each other are providing a glimpse at the future of coordinated, autonomous drone technology.


Their creators, ETH Zurich say the copters have potential application in both the military and civilian worlds, with ever-improving technology that allows them to work as a well-coordinated team.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Autonomous drones flock like birds

Autonomous drones flock like birds | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
A Hungarian team has created the first drones that can fly as a coordinated flock. The researchers watched as the ten autonomous robots took to the air in a field outside Budapest, zipping through the open sky, flying in formation or even following a leader, all without any central control.

...

“This is remarkable work,” says Iain Couzin, who studies collective animal behaviour at Princeton University in New Jersey. “It is the first outdoor demonstration of how biologically inspired rules can be used to create resilient yet dynamic flocks. [It suggests] we will be able to achieve large, coordinated robot flocks much sooner than many would have anticipated.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Drone with robotic legs can perch on a branch like a bird

Drone with robotic legs can perch on a branch like a bird | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Quadcopter drones are built specifically for an easy takeoff and stable flight, but landing can be a tricky task. They generally need to land on flat ground or risk toppling over.

Bhargav Gajjar, a roboticist based out of MIT and Vishwa Robotics, has built a drone to solve that problem. According to New Scientist, which published a video of a working prototype Monday, Gajjar used a high-speed camera to capture how dozens of types of birds land. He then built a drone with robotic legs that emulate the American kestrel’s.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Jellyfish-power prepares for lift-off

Drone developers are increasingly attempting to mimic the flight mechanics of birds an insects for the next generation of miniature, autonomous aircraft, but one researcher in New York, has found inspiration in the sea rather than the air. Leif Ristroph of New York University is developing a drone that replicates the pulsating motion of the jellyfish as an alternative drive system for future drones. Sharon Reich has more.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Construction is complete on behemoth airship; first flight planned

Construction is complete on behemoth airship; first flight planned | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

According to aircraft maker Worldwide Aeros Corp., construction is complete on a 36,000-pound blimp-like aircraft designed for the military to carry tons of cargo to remote areas around the world.


The Montebello company hopes to have a first flight in the coming months and to demonstrate cargo-carrying capability shortly thereafter.


"This is truly the beginning of a vertical global transportation solution for perhaps the next 100 years,” Chief Executive Igor Pasternak said in a statement.


Worldwide Aeros, a company of about 100 employees, built the prototype under a contract of about $35 million from the Pentagon and NASA.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Next-gen US drone: Now equipped with ‘death ray’ laser

Next-gen US drone: Now equipped with ‘death ray’ laser | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
The next generation of military drones, unveiled by a leading US manufacturer, will not just carry a limited supply of rockets – but will likely be fitted with an ultra-light laser, capable of repeatedly destroying objects at the speed of light.

“It would give us an unlimited magazine,” a person close to the High Energy Liquid Laser Area Defense System (HELLADS) program told Time magazine.

Over the past four years, the Defense Advance Research Project Agency (DARPA) has given contractor General Atomics over $60 million to develop and then scale HELLADS – a powerful 150 kW ray with a difference.

RT.com
11 Dec 2012
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Drone learns from humans how to navigate a forest - DIY Drones

Drone learns from humans how to navigate a forest - DIY Drones | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it
From the ROS blog:
The Robotics Institute at CMU has been developing systems to learn from humans. Using a Machine Learning class of techniques called Imitation Learning the group has developed AI software for a small commercially available off-the-shelf ARdrone to autonomously fly through the dense trees for over 3.4 km in experimental runs. They are also developing methods to do longer range planning with such purely vision-guided UAVs. Such technology has a lot of potential impact for surveillance, search and rescue and allowing UAVs to safely share airspace with manned airspace.
ddrrnt's insight:

Watch the video at DIYdrones to see the drone fly through an unstructured environment. 


More re: Autopilot

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ddrrnt from #DroneWatch
Scoop.it!

HyTAQ hybrid quadrotor robot travels by air and land, leaves us no place to hide

HyTAQ hybrid quadrotor robot travels by air and land, leaves us no place to hide | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

Few robots can travel gracefully through more than one medium; more often than not, they're either strictly airborne or tied to the ground. The Illinois Institute of Technology's HyTAQ quadrotor doesn't abide by these arbitrary limits. The hybrid machine, designed by Arash Kalantari and Matthew Spenko, uses the same actuators to drive both its flight as well as a surrounding cage for rolling along on the ground, quickly switching between the two methods.


It's clearly adaptable, but using the one system also provides large power advantages over a traditional quadrotor, Spenko tells us. While HyTAQ's battery lasts only for 5 minutes and 1,969 feet of pure flight, that jumps to 27 minutes and 7,874 feet when the robot can use a smooth floor instead -- and of course, it can hop over ground obstacles altogether instead of making a detour.


The range of the robot and its pilot are the main limiting factors, but the patent process is already underway with hopes of winning commercial deals. We're both excited and worried as a result; as wonderfully flexible as HyTAQ is, widescale adoption could lead to especially relentless robots during the inevitable takeover.


See video demonstration here.


Via dhorn
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ddrrnt
Scoop.it!

Drone that can dodge obstacles developed by US scientists

Drone that can dodge obstacles developed by US scientists | Rise of the Drones | Scoop.it

An unmanned drone that can fly around hazards such as trees and poles without human control has been developed, opening the possibility of more autonomous flight.


Now, however, researchers at New York's Cornell University have managed to develop software that will help drones to dodge obstacles.


In the experiments, a miniature helicopter equipped with a camera captures images as it flies. Software developed by assistant professor of computer science Ashutosh Saxena and his team turns the image in the drone's camera into a 3D model of its environment, and the robotic brain then uses an algorithm to determine which objects are obstacles.


In 53 flights in environments full of hazards, the robot managed to find a pathway without crashing into any obstacles - although the final two flights failed due to gusts of wind.


Eventually it is hoped that the drone will be able to calculate wind patterns and avoid moving objects such as birds.


The research is being funded by US Defence agency DARPA and drone-producer Lockheed Martin.


By Ben Bryant

08 Nov 2012

Telegraph.co.uk

more...
No comment yet.