Rights and responsibilities of users and producers of goods and services globally
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Take a Step for Fairtrade | Full campaign movie - YouTube

In 2012 we're asking everyone to Take a Step for Fairtrade. It can be a simple step, like swapping your tea to Fairtrade, or a bigger step, like asking every...
Ella Grace Gubb's insight:

Overview:

This clip introduces the concept of fair trade and the effect it has on the workers around the world. Issues such as lack of medical treatment, food and education for themselves and their families is introduced. However it also discusses how we can make a difference step by step to help these workers. For example by purchasing goods, which are fair trade certified. These products include tea, sugar and chocolate.

 

Teaching Idea:

By introducing the idea of fair trade and the bigger picture behind it, students can then explore what products they could swap in their homes, or at school, to being fair trade. The site also explores what fair trade is. The website this clip is made for has the following page which students would then read to further develop their ideas about fair trade:

http://www.funkidslive.com/features/a-to-z-of-food-health-and-the-environment/f-is-for-fairtrade/

This will encourage the students to think about how small decisions we made and the people around us make can have a big effect. In addition to how those products being produced by these workers does not just affect them, but their families and communities.

 

Assessment:

The way the clip has been formed requires the viewer to read in an alternative ways, and the script is written. This is a literacy link.

The students would also read the website page explaining fair trade. Then as part of a think pair share activity, students would individually write down what they feel to be the most significant part of what fair trade is and its affects, and something they could do to have a positive effect on it. Then share with a partner their thought.

 

v RS3.5 Reads independently an extensive range of texts with increasing content demands and responds to themes and issues.

v WS3.9 Produces a wide range of well-structured and well-presented literary and factual texts for a wide variety of purposes and audiences using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and written language features.

 

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45,000 reasons to swap to fairtrade chocolate - YouTube

We take you to Ghana, where local farmers talk about the amazing benefits they receive from producing fairtrade cocoa.
Ella Grace Gubb's insight:

Overview:

This YouTube clip looks as the farming of cocoa in Ghana. It is created by Oxfam, and looks at local farmers there who are producing and harvesting fair trade cocoa. There are roughly 45,000 farmers in this industry in Ghana. Profits are also used to provide scholarships for local children in opportunities in education as well as assisting schools in the local communities. Another benefit is that they provide the knowledge to the farmers so that they know how to better trade their produce.

 

Teaching Idea:

 This provides students with a global perspective on how a product they or their families and community purchases comes from somewhere so far away. This would encourage students to critically think about the products they buy, and where they come from. In addition what steps are taken, and what affects these products such as chocolate can of so many other people in the world.

 A ‘questioning in role’ or ‘hot seat’ drama lesson would be used to encourage the students to think about how the products we buy are produced and sold. “Hot-seating, or questioning can be used when participants have a need to expand their understanding of a particular situation by questioning a character…in role” (Ewing, 2011. pp. 57). The students would be given slips of paper, with a situation written on them they are to embody. The class would ask them questions about their life with guidance from the teacher.

 

 

Reference:

Ewing, R. & Gibson, R. (2011). Transforming the Curriculum through the arts. South Yarra, Victoria: Palgrave Macmillan

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Fair Trade Schools

Fair Trade Schools | Rights and responsibilities of users and producers of goods and services globally | Scoop.it
The Fair Trade Association works with primary and secondary schools throughout Australia and New Zealand to promote the Fair Trade Movement. Please find information below on how you can sign up your...
Ella Grace Gubb's insight:

Overview:

Fair trade schools is an program designed for schools in Australia and New Zealand to increase awareness about fair trade and what students, schools and communities can do to assist it. A class or school can sign up with the program and register the changes they made to increase fair trade awareness. These include informing the other classes about this issue through pamphlets and speeches. Also through the changing of products used by the class and school to which to fair trade approved products.

 

Teaching Ideas:

This encourages the students to think about how they themselves can make a difference. It also encourages them to think about social justice and effect they have on the world. “Social justice education…encourages students to investigate situations in which social justice might be denied or enjoyed…It encourages students to plan and participate in action to redress social injustices” (Gilbert, 2011, pp. 368). Through active participation students become more engaged with the topic.

 

Assessment Ideas:

The class would participate in this program and sign up online. They would then brainstorm products they could change such as ensuring that the tea, coffee and sugar in the staff room is all fair trade. Then thinks of ways to put these into action. Students would be asked to each create their own pamphlet or form of media to explain fair trade and give examples of things individuals as well as the community can do to make a difference.

 

 

Reference:

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th edition). Victoria, Australia: Cengage learning.

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World Vision Australia - What is the real cost of chocolate?

World Vision Australia - What is the real cost of chocolate? | Rights and responsibilities of users and producers of goods and services globally | Scoop.it
Love chocolate? Next time you bite into your favourite bar, consider this: what might have cost you just a dollar or two, may well have cost a child cocoa farm labourer in West Africa his or her entire childhood.
Ella Grace Gubb's insight:

Overview:

This webpage as part of World Vision Australia looks at child trafficking for slavery in the production of chocolate in West Africa. It also discusses the Australian chocolate industry and weather different brands sold in Australia are ethically produced. There is the introduction of the signing of the 2001 Harkin Engel Protocol. Which is about the public acknowledgement of the issue of forced child labour, and the continued commitment to address this and provide resources to address it.

 

 

Teaching Idea:

As chocolate is a likely to be loved by most students this is an engaging topic for kids. This would encourage students to be critically thinking about something they have a prior attachment to. Students would be instantly engaged by this topic. analysing this score card attached students could then evaluate which companies would be best to purchase chocolate from, and which are the least ethical.

https://www.worldvision.com.au/Libraries/DTL_Demand_Ethical_Chocolate/ChocolateScorecard_Revised_Feb_2013_FINAL.pdf

 

Pedagogical Research:

 As discussed by Schellens & Valcke (2005) by guiding students through the five phases of learning, new information in introduced to an existing topic. They then research this further by reading about the different brands and their acknowledgements of ethical production of their chocolate. This new information is then adapted into the students existing knowledge.

 This also relates to Piaget’s stages of cognitive development. In that prior knowledge is made a connection to. Then new information is introduced, and is assimilated to form newly defined knowledge and perspective. “In this process the child inwardly adapts the environment of his perception of the environment to his own biological systems” (Russell, 1977, pp. 14). By introducing new information to a students existing knowledge in a meaningful and engaging way they adopt and value the knowledge with greater capacity.

 

Assessment and Numeracy Link:

As an assignment have students in groups of four analyse the data provided. The groups will create pictorial graphs represent the information about which companies are the most ethical in regards to child labour in chocolate production. 

 

- NS3.4

Compares, orders and calculates with decimals, simple fractions and simple percentages


-DS3.1

Displays and interprets data in graphs with scales of many-to-one

correspondence

 

Reference:

Schellens, T. & Valcke, M. (2005). Collaborative learning in asynchronous discussion groups: What about the impact on cognitive processing? Belgium: Elsevier

 

Russell, C. D. (1977). HASTENING CHILDREN'S COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT FROM PIAGET'S PREOPERATIONAL TO CONCRETE STAGE. (Order No. 7718900, Brigham Young University). ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, , 183-183 p. Retrieved from http://ezproxy.library.usyd.edu.au/login?url=http://search.proquest.com/docview/302862004?accountid=14757. (302862004).

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home

The Australian Indigenous Art Trade Association is the national organisation for persons and organisations experienced in the business of Aboriginal Art.
Ella Grace Gubb's insight:

Overview:

This is a website for the Australian Indigenous Art Trade Association. They work to ensure that Indigenous artists of Australia are not taken advantage of and are paid fairly for their work. The code of ethical conduct for Indigenous Art is introduced. As well as its development and purpose on the website to the students.

 

Teaching Idea:

This stimulus about fair trade brings the idea back home, as lots of what has been looked at and is focused on is international. As we are a nation of consumption, we also purchase a large percentage of these products, which would be unethically produced and sold. It is important to remember that this can happen on our own shores as well. It is vital for students to understand the chain from the producer of a product or service to its sale. It is not always

 

Assessment Idea:

A joint construction of a mind map explaining what they have learnt to far about fair trade internationally and nationally would be constructed on the board. Students would then go off and write in their own words what they believe fair trade to be. And what they or their community can do to assist its development and future.

 

Literacy link:

This links to Literacy in students’ ability to express their newly acquired and developed knowledge in a factually written form. As well as contributing to the class discussion and creation of a mind map about fair trade.

 

WS3.9

Produces a wide range of well-structured and well-presented literary and factual texts for a wide variety of purposes and audiences using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and written language features.

 

WS3.12

Produces texts in a fluent and legible style and uses computer technology to present these effectively in a variety of ways. 

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