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Lean Sensei of the Toyota Production System Methods
Curated by Karl Rickman
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Robert Miller Speaks at John Deere

Robert Miller, Executive Director of The Shingo Prize for Operational Excellence, spoke at John Deere Power Products in Greeneville, TN.
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Standardization Doesn’t Stamp Out Creativity | The Deming Institute Blog | John Hunter

Standardization Doesn’t Stamp Out Creativity | The Deming Institute Blog | John Hunter | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it

"[...] One of the things I find annoying, in this way, is that reducing variation and using standardization is said to mean everyone has to be the same and creativity is stamped out. This is not what Dr. Deming said at all. And the claim makes no sense when you look at how much emphasis he put on joy in work and the importance of using everyone’s creativity. Yet I hear it over and over, decade after decade."


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Michel Baudin's curator insight, October 27, 2015 10:09 AM

Yes, the metric system did not stifle anybody's creativity. By making commerce, engineering, and science easier, it actually helped creative people innovate, invent, and discover. 

 

But when Deming says "Standardization does not mean that we all wear the same color and weave of cloth, eat standard sandwiches, or live in standard rooms with standard furnishings," he seems to exclude the possibility that standardization could be abused. 


Rather than presenting standardization as a universal good, I think we should restrict its scope to domains where it is useful. Weights and measures is an obvious one, and there are even cases where making people "wear the same color and weave of cloth" makes sense, for example, if crews on airliners didn't wear uniforms, passengers couldn't tell them apart from other passengers. 


On the other hand, the Hollywood formula for romantic comedies is a standard we don't need. We don't need the obligatory chase at the end when one of the heroes has to find a way to prevent the other one leaving forever. 


Even in manufacturing, standards are not always helpful. You don't need a standard for the size of end-balls on motorcycle brake handles. In the 1980s, international committees hammered out comprehensive 7-layered standards on the way computers should communicate, that were set aside by the Internet. (See http://michelbaudin.com/2012/07/09/what-are-standards-for/)


The lack of an obviously useful standard also sometimes has unexpected consequences. In Japan, for example, half the country gets 50Hz power and the other half 60Hz, as a result of which, its electronics industry developed products you can plug into power sources from 97 to 240V and 50 to 60Hz. 


So, let's use standards where they help, but let's not become standardization zealots!



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90% of Your Work is Waste – Become LEAN in the Office

90% of Your Work is Waste – Become LEAN in the Office | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
90% of Your Work is #Waste _ Become #LEAN in the Office http://t.co/R3khxSnZpS #infographic #hcldr #work @kaizenfactory

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Not Exactly Poka-Yoke and Chaku-Chaku

"Japanese automobile manufacturing methods are adopted by American competitors. Watch the concept of poka-yoke, meaning "correct" and chaku-chaku, meaning "one worker, several tasks" in the manufacture of rear view mirrors."


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Michel Baudin's curator insight, January 14, 2015 8:12 PM

An interesting video, but "Poka-Yoke" and "Chaku-Chaku" don't mean what the narration says they do. And they are not "Japanese" methods but methods invented by specific individuals in specific companies that happened to be in Japan. Likewise, the assembly line is not an "American" method but a method invented by P.E. Martin, Charles Sorensen and others at Ford. 

 

"Poka-Yoke" doesn't just mean "correct." More specifically, a Poka-Yoke is a device integrated in the production process to prevent human error or detect it immediately without adding any labor. Checking bar codes on parts, as shown in a video, doesn't qualify as a Poka-Yoke because it adds labor, and error prevention devices that add labor are ineffective because they are by-passed under pressure. 

 

The video shows an operator attending to a sequence of tasks and calls it "Chaku-Chaku." There is, however, ,more to Chaku-Chaku than this, such as automatic processing at each station, with automatic unloading and chutes between stations, so that the work of the operator is focused on checking the part after an operation and loading it into the next. 

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How to Do a Gemba Walk

A 'how to' outline for executives trying to do an effective Gemba Walk

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Michel Baudin's curator insight, February 10, 2015 12:21 PM

No disagreement with what Michael Bremer is saying, but I would emphasize observation skills more.

 

One exercise Kei Abe came up with is the bug hunt. You take a team of managers to the floor and give each one 20 red tags. They they have 20 minutes to attach the tags to such "bugs" as frayed cables, devices held with duct tape, puddles of lubricant, misplaced items, etc. They usually have no trouble using all 20 tags.

 

I also ask people to be like the Count in Sesame Street and count people walking, machines not working, etc. These activities have a data collection and validation value in their own right, but they also focus the eyes of participants and make them notice details they would otherwise miss.

Carolina Rojo's curator insight, April 29, 2015 12:59 PM

GEMBA

Philippe Doyon's curator insight, July 20, 2015 12:18 PM

Voici une excellente présentation sur comment BIEN faire une des activités essentielles de tous gestionnaires: la "Gemba Walk"!

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3rd Annual Survey of US-Based Manufacturing Executives | BCG

"BCG's latest manufacturing survey finds decision makers at large manufacturers expect the U.S. share of their production to rise an average of 7 percent in five years; half expect to boost U.S. factory jobs by 5 percent or more."


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Michel Baudin's curator insight, February 24, 2015 8:01 PM

As you can see from the survey methodology on slide 11, the findings are based on responses from 252 manufacturing companies with revenues <$1B, in which one individual took the trouble to answer.

According to Industry Week's 2014 rankings, however, the top 500 manufacturing companies in the US all have more than $1B in sales, meaning that barely 50% of the companies spared a manager's time to respond. 

How exactly do answers from such a self-selected sample enable anyone to make general statements about the intentions of all manufacturers?

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Continuous Safety: The Toyota Way

Continuous Safety: The Toyota Way | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it

The Toyota Industrial Equipment Manufacturing, Inc. plant in Columbus, Ind., is a busy, bustling place.

At full capacity, 1,300 workers are crowded into the million square-foot facility, navigating tight rows and busy cells, pumping out a new, custom-built Toyota lift truck every 3:40 on its main assembly line alone.

It's a safe plant, as you'd expect from anything in the Toyota family. But that's no easy task to achieve.


Via dumontis
Karl Rickman's insight:

I am surprised at the high number of temporary workers. The strength of the systems put in place and "Safety 1st" daily focus is what is always been Toyota's cornerstone. I was taught at Toyota that they are a "System" based company not a "Results" based company. This means "Results" are just the report card of good repeatable systems. By usual theme I teach where ever I consult is "Systems drive Behaviors and Behaviors drive the Culture". 

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Public & Private Leaders were Inspired at CA Continuous Improvement Forum ... - PR Web (press release)

Public & Private Leaders were Inspired at CA Continuous Improvement Forum ... - PR Web (press release) | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
Rocklin, CA (PRWEB) October 16, 2014 -- Leaders from business and state government at the “California Continuous Improvement Forum” on Oct.
Karl Rickman's insight:

Lean in government? Yes it can!

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Kaizen Coaching: Don’t Give People Answers, Let Them Learn

Kaizen Coaching: Don’t Give People Answers, Let Them Learn | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
Blog post at Lean Blog : Last week, I taught a pilot session of a new class on Kaizen and continuous improvement that I taught for visitors to the ThedaCare Center f[..]
Karl Rickman's insight:

Mark is right on with his perceptions as always. I call it "Respect the person". That means that people can figure it out for them selves with the correct guidance. Then they own the outcome! It comes back to "Do you teach them to fish for themselves or just always give them the fish?" You will be amazed on how people will come up with different ways to fish and as the instructor you will learn new thinking from the students.

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Techniques to Improve Manufacturing Productivity

Techniques to Improve Manufacturing Productivity | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it

From two-slice toasters to Boeing jets, tools and dies are omnipresent staples of manufacturing. And where there are tools and dies, there are idle employees and lost production.


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The Goals That Matter: SQDCM | Mark Graban

The Goals That Matter: SQDCM | Mark Graban | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it

Blog post at Lean Blog : "Today is the start of the 2014 World Cup, which means much of the world will be talking about goals.I’m not really a soccer, I mean football, fan but I’m all for goals. In the Lean management system, we generally have five high-level goals. These were the goals taught to us in the auto industry, where I started my career, and they apply in healthcare."


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Michel Baudin's curator insight, June 15, 2014 10:00 AM

As I learned it, it was "Quality, Cost, Delivery, Safety, and Morale" -(QCDSM) rather than SQDCM. I am not sure the order matters that much. The rationale for grouping Quality, Cost, and Delivery is that they matter to customers, while Safety and Morale are internal issues of your organization, visible to customers only to the extent that they affect the other three. 

 

They are actually dimensions of performance rather than goals. "Safety," by itself, is not a goal; operating the safest plants in your industry is a goal. In management as taught in school, if you set this goal, you have to be able to assess how far you are from it and to tell when you have reached it. It means translating this goal into objectives that are quantified in metrics. 

 

In this spirit, you decide to track, say, the number of consecutive days without lost time accidents, and the game begins. First, minor cuts and bruises, or repetitive stress, don't count because they don't result in the victims taking time off. Then, when a sleeve snagged by a machine pulls an operator's hand into molten aluminum, the victim is blamed for hurting the plant's performance. 


Similar stories can be told about Quality, Cost, Delivery and Morale, and the recent scandal in the US Veterans' Administration hospitals shows how far managers will go to fix their metrics. 


To avoid this, you need to reduce metrics to their proper role of providing information an possibly generating alarms. In health care, you may measure patients' temperature to detect an outbreak of fever, but you don't measure doctors by their ability to keep the temperature of their patients under 102°F, with sanctions if they fail.

 

Likewise, on a production shop floor, the occurrence of incidents is a signal that you need to act. Then you improve safety by eliminating risks like oil on the floor, frayed cables, sharp corners on machines, unmarked transportation aisles, or inappropriate motions in operator jobs. You don't make the workplace safer not by just rating managers based on metrics. 


In summary, I don't see anything wrong with SQDCM as a list. It covers all the dimensions of performance that you need to worry about in manufacturing operations, as well as many service operations. Mark uses it in health care, but it appears equally relevant in, say, car rental or restaurants. I don't see it as universal, in that I don't think it is sufficient in, for example, research and development. 

And, in practice, focusing on SQDCM  easily degenerates into a metrics game. 

 

 

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A Company Without Job Titles Will Still Have Hierarchies | Harrison Monarth | HBR Blog

A Company Without Job Titles Will Still Have Hierarchies | Harrison Monarth | HBR Blog | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it

"Radically flat. That’s the management goal that Tony Hseih, founder of e-commerce giant Zappos, aims to achieve by the end of 2014. To get there, Hsieh plans to toss out the traditional corporate hierarchy by eliminating titles among his 1,500 employees that can lead to bottlenecks in decision-making. The end result: a holacracy centered around self-organizing teams who actively push the entire business forward."


Via Michel Baudin
Karl Rickman's insight:

I agree with Michael's comments. Every one needs leadership and direction. If you observe a classical orchestra with each seat warming up their particular role in the arrangement it is utterly painful noise even though each are professional musicians. When the Band Director steps in front, taps the podium and leads the professionals to become beautiful music. The keys is minimizing the natural gap between the leader and the team not eliminating it.

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Michel Baudin's curator insight, April 25, 2014 9:46 AM

In this strange article, organization, hierarchy, and status is treated exclusively as a psychological issue. There is not a word about the need to get the organization's work done, and its implications in terms of responsibility and authority. 

For example, you need a process to resolve differences of opinion on what needs to be done. Particularly when the choice is not obvious, you need one person mandated to make a decision and take responsibility for the consequences. It's called a manager. 

As an employee, at any level, you need someone who speaks for the company and can tell you its expectations. It's called a boss. 

It may be psychological uncomfortable to follow procedures and report to another human being, but it is generally recognized as a price you have to pay to get 10 people -- or 300,000  -- to work effectively towards a common goal. 

Remove all these structures and procedures, and what do you get? Self-organized teams doing great work? Or indecision, frustration, bullying, and chaos? 

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One-On-One: Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky President Wil James

One-On-One: Toyota Motor Manufacturing Kentucky President Wil James | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
Since beginning his career with Toyota in 1987, Wil James has served in multiple leadership roles within Toyota’s network of U.S. manufacturing operations.

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dumontis's curator insight, March 16, 2014 6:14 AM

Just some notes from the article:

- sales determines speed

- build products where you sell them

- wholly owned

- platform thinking

- strong production system culture

- cross train

- "we teach all of that" (re auto industry experience)

- invest in skilled workers (even for others)

- skilled staff is a multi-skilled worker

- the Toyota system requires discipline

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The Toyota Effect - The Morning News

The Toyota Effect - The Morning News | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
At the Harbor-UCLA Medical Center eye clinic, patients were going blind waiting for treatment. “Sometimes when you work in chaos, you don’t know how to get out of it,” says…

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Akio Toyoda's aggressive reboot | Automotive News

Akio Toyoda's aggressive reboot | Automotive News | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
Akio Toyoda is rolling out an aggressive overhaul of Toyota Motor Corp. that aims to improve everything from manufacturing and product planning to design and human resources.

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Mr Ritsuo Shingo - What is Toyota Production System? - Lean Manufacturing - YouTube

Paul asked Mr. Ritsuo Shango what is the Toyota Production System (TPS)? How would he describe it to me if I knew nothing about lean manufacturing and I met ...

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Lean six sigma the oxymoron | Troy Taylor | LinkedIn

Lean six sigma the oxymoron | Troy Taylor | LinkedIn | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it

"In the beginning Toyota created TPS, then came Motorola in 1986 with their six sigma process. In 1988 John Krafcik coined the term Lean in his paper entitled“Triumph of the Lean production system” which was quickly popularised by Womack, Roos and Jones in 1991 with the publication of their book “The machine that changed the world”. Then in 2002 Michael George and Robert Lawrence junior published their book entitled “Lean Six Sigma: Combining Six Sigma with Lean Speed”.

Ever since this point organisations have been attempting to mesh the 2 methodologies into one business improvement technique and failing."


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Michel Baudin's curator insight, January 30, 2015 12:14 PM

Troy speaks from experience. Mine is similar, but I am not as negative on Six Sigma as he is. I think of Six Sigma as an approach that is useful within a range of applicability and is limited in scope.  

dumontis's curator insight, February 1, 2015 1:27 PM

I've "lived" in both systems and know firsthand the benefits but also shortcomings of both. I do see value in both, but feel Six Sigma is limited in scope. Not by principles, but by approach which is more like a Six Sigma "add-on" instead of Lean "inside". That said, I' ve also seen Lean "add-on" like approaches that are just as limited as Six Sigma as an "add-on".

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Toyota Kentucky 2012 - YouTube

At Toyota Motor Manufacturing, Kentucky, Kentuckians combine the time-tested principles of one of the world’s leading automakers with hands-on dedication to ...


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NUMMI | This American Life - Radio Episode

NUMMI | This American Life - Radio Episode | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
A car plant in Fremont California that might have saved the U.S. car industry. In 1984, General Motors and Toyota opened NUMMI as a joint venture. Toyota showed GM the secrets of its production system: How it made cars of much higher quality and much lower cost than GM achieved.

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Why So Many Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma, And Other ...

Why So Many Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma, And Other ... | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
Why So Many Lean Manufacturing, Six Sigma, And Other Improvement Projects Fail. If you have been around a few years you will almost certainly have seen at least a few fads come and go about how you can improve your ...

Via David Job
Karl Rickman's insight:

Good insight but one caution is fast implementation. Improvements faster than the organization can handle and sustain autonomously will fail and hurt your efforts.

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Jerry Linnins's curator insight, April 6, 2014 1:46 PM

A recent HBR article clammed 8 in 10 fail or fail to sustain longer than 6. Months.

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Benjamin Franklin: The front-runner of Quality / Continuous Improvement

Benjamin Franklin: The front-runner of Quality / Continuous Improvement | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
“Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning. When you're finished changing, you're finished”Among the many things Benjamin Franklin is
Karl Rickman's insight:

Interesting perspective.

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SD manufacturers, educators learn strategies at Toyota - Sioux Falls Argus Leader

SD manufacturers, educators learn strategies at Toyota - Sioux Falls Argus Leader | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
Two groups of manufacturers and educators spent this week and last touring schools and companies in Kentucky, including Toyota Motor.
Karl Rickman's insight:

This is a ver interesting Benchmark tour that explains what is possible with the correct Plan, Do, & Check. It is only missing the action results by the group.

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Why Do Silos Form and How Can We Knock Them Down? | Change Management content from IndustryWeek

Why Do Silos Form and How Can We Knock Them Down? | Change Management content from IndustryWeek | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it

GratStrong leadership, a common strategic vision and a focus on meeting customers' needs are required to change the culture to one of teamwork and cooperation.

Karl Rickman's insight:

This is great example of the danger of silos within a organization.

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'Lean' lessons for Irish business from Toyota

'Lean' lessons for Irish business from Toyota | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
“ The key differentiator between ‘Lean’ processes in Japan and Europe is that in Japan there is less focus on hard automation and more on the development of people, according to Dr Richard Keegan, fellow of the Institute of Engineers and manager of the competitiveness department at Enterprise Ireland.”
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Toyota is becoming more efficient by replacing robots with humans

Toyota is becoming more efficient by replacing robots with humans | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it
Car makers have embraced automation and replaced humans with robots for years.
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Is OEE a Useful Key Performance Indicator? | Jeffrey Liker

Is OEE a Useful Key Performance Indicator? | Jeffrey Liker | Rickman Lean Solutions | Scoop.it

"For manufacturing that is equipment-intensive, how the equipment works is often the main factor in productivity. Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) has become a buzzword in lean and a generally accepted metric is Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE). This is measured as the product of three factors:

OEE = Availability x Performance x Quality

Availability = run time/total time

Performance = Total count of parts/target count (based on a standard)Quality = Good count/Total count

Ignacio S. Gatell,  questions whether companies using OEE really understand it, can explain it clearly to their customers, and understand what it means to compare OEE as a KPI across plants. He questions whether even plant managers understand how it is calculated and what it means.

The only good argument for OEE is that at a macro-level in a plant it provides a high level picture of how your equipment is functioning."


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Michel Baudin's curator insight, March 8, 2014 9:51 AM

About 15 years ago, a summer intern came to work at a client plant in aerospace machining. I thought a great project for him would have been to identify a common tooling package for machining centers that were grouped in a "Flexible Manufacturing System" (FMS). It was challenging, but it would have actually given the FMS the flexibility it was supposed to have. It was a real engineering project that would have improved performance.

 

Management, however, decided that a better use of his time was to collect data and calculate OEEs for another set of machines. It did keep the student busy all summer, but resulted in no change, and no improvement bragging rights for the student. 


I have had a problem with OEE ever since. It is an overly aggregated and commonly gamed metric that you can only use by breaking it down into its constituent factors; you might as well bypass this step and go straight to the factors. 


Among these factors, I find Availability to be most often confused with Uptime. The availability of a device is the probability that it works when you need it, and the total time in the denominator has to be the time you need it for. For example, if you work two shifts a day, the availability of a machine is not affected by your taking it down for maintenance on third shift. There have been cases of managers overproducing to increase run time and thereby boost the OEE of their machines...