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Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Jakarta's traffic is legendary and locals have now become experts at finding ways to get around the jams, with some even making money out of them.

 

The population of Indonesia is heavily concentrated on the island of Java, and the capital city of Jakarta faces a tremendous strain on it's transportation network.  This video show that resourceful people will find inventive ways to make an unworkable situation manageable. 


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Jakarta is faced with overpopulation and traffic problems. The government passed a law, which requires a vehicle to have passengers aboard, in the hopes of speeding up the traffic entering the city. However, some drivers are paying people to take a ride with them into the city to avoid the fines. In most areas throughout the world, passengers would be paying the driver for a ride, but in this city, it is different. The government should find another solution to fix the traffic issues. 

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 1:12 PM

As urban population growth rises, transportation systems will be put under greater strain. Jakarta's transportation crisis is one of the worst in the world, and people sit in traffic for hours traveling to work or to do errands. Due to incompetencies in the system, people are finding different ways to make travel easier. Motorbike cabs as well as people standing on street corners offering to be passengers in order for cars to travel in the car-pool lanes are two ways people are getting around. These underground transportation services are illegal, but their extent cannot be contained by law enforcement. 

 

Jakarta, as well as many other cities, are continuing to grow due to the global trend of people moving into urban areas. With more people than ever choosing to reside in cities instead of rural areas, new transportation systems will need to be developed in order to accommodate for growth.  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:35 PM

The amount of traffic in Jakarta is staggering and the traffic itself has built up a business of making commuting to work easier. What is troubling is that the government hasn't made enough of an effort to fix the problem of traffic in its largest and most economically viable city. If Jakarta wants to keep growing the government has to step in and find a way to make getting to work realistic for Indonesians.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 9:38 PM

The traffic in Jakarta is insane, to be in a constant standstill on your way to work is unreal. The reporter in the video says that if the city of Jakarta continues on its current path, it could be "in a state of Paralysis" which for an entire city is not good. The traffic has, for some, become a way to make money, illegally but money nonetheless.

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Uluru - News & Media - Tourism Australia

Uluru - News & Media - Tourism Australia | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Uluru is one of Australia's most recognisable natural icons. The world-renowned sandstone formation stands 348 metres high with most of its bulk below the ground, and measures 9.4 kilometres in circumference.
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Uluru is a unique, natural icon in Australia. This monolith is the largest in the world at 2848 feet, and attracts many tourists every year. It is located in the middle of Australia, where less than 2% of the county's population lives. It is truly a great natural wonder of the world. 

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Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger

Ramen To The Rescue: How Instant Noodles Fight Global Hunger | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
The supercheap and palatable noodles help low-wage workers around the world get by, anthropologists argue in a new book. And rather than lament the ascendance of this highly processed food, they argue we should try to make it more nutritious.

Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

I am sure almost every person in this country has eaten instant noodles at one point in their life. Due to the fact they are very cheap and enjoyable. Today, many impoverished people all over the world eat these instant noodles, as they are economical. Although they are not a nutritious, they can temporarily relieve people’s hunger.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:06 AM

Ramen became an essential food to help the people who were starving all over the world. This food is cheap to buy and easy to make so it is a perfect food to feed millions of people who are starving everyday. The only bad thing about it is that it is not very healthy to be eating constantly. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:10 PM

Its pretty crazy to think something as simple as ramen noodles can help feed billions of people. in the western world iramen is the butt currently for running jokes about poor college kids, i never thought it would have this impact. I can now say that ramen is a nessicty in some areas. Who cares about the slight health affects because if some of this people didnt have ramen they would already be dead from starvation. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:32 PM

I think everyone has had ramen noodles at some point in there life. I do enjoy ramen noodles here and there but couldn't eat it daily. I have found in some of my cookbooks they use ramen noodles in their recipes. It is mostly the quick and easy recipes.  if we are the 6th highest country that purchases ramen noodles I am convinced everyone eats it. 

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Kiribati and Climate Change

Kiribati and Climate Change | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Fearing that climate change could wipe out their Pacific archipelago, the leaders of Kiribati are considering an unusual backup plan: moving the population to Fiji.

 

How urgent is the issue of climate change?  That question is not only geographic in content, but the response might also be somewhat contingent on geography as well.  If your country literally has no higher ground to retreat to, the thought of even minimal sea level change would be totally devastating. 


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

The leaders from Kiribati are considering moving some of their population to Fiji. They fear climate change could destroy their islands and force their population to leave. They want to purchase 6,000 acres from Fiji, which should be enough land for Kiribati's 103,000 people. The people hope they will not have to move to Fiji, but buying this land is a good backup plan incase their islands are a victim to climate change.   

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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 1:23 PM

This is more than immigration, this plan is moving an entire country within another! Climate change doesn't effect the world equally in the same way that different countries are nowhere near equal. In a place as small as Kiribati, the entire place could be wiped out. The population of the nation is around 100,000 for reference.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 4:31 PM

This shows one of the worst consequences of climate change, large scale migration. If sea levels continue to rise, millions of people will be displaced and other countries will have to take in these environmental refugees. Climate change will directly and indirectly impact the geography of the world. Population geography will be drastically altered when areas like Kiribati are wiped off the map. 

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This week, Samoa will skip Friday

This week, Samoa will skip Friday | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it

"Just this once, Samoa is making Dec. 30 disappear."

 

I hope you enjoy your Friday, because they won't in Samoa.  It didn't even happen, since they've canceled Friday Dec. 30th and just skipped straight to Dec 31st.  This would make no sense without an understanding of the International Date Line and the regional economic networks of Oceania.  Since Samoa's economy in tightly connected to New Zealand and Australia (on the 'other' side of the IDL) it's financially beneficial to have their work weeks line up to faciliate same day communications and business interactions.   For more see: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-12-29/samoa-time-zone-jump/3751254 and http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/30/world/asia/samoa-to-skip-friday-and-switch-time-zones.html?ref=sethmydans


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

I agree with the decision Samoa made to switch to the West side of the International Date Line. By doing this, the country completely skipped a day. Also, years ago Samoa switched from driving on the right side of the road (American style) to the left side (British style). They made these changes because their economy is connected to countries on the other side of the IDL, such as Australia and New Zealand.  

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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 1:16 PM

Thank God It's... Saturday? December 30th was cancelled in Samoa due to the country being right on the border of the international date line. It's important for them to stay in step with New Zealand and Australia where many of their business connections lie. It's important to remember that calenders are a man made invention too, as odd as this whole situation sounds.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 11:10 AM

Samoa and its neighbor Tokelau decided to undergo a time change that would align them with their Asian trading partners. With this new time zone, Samoa will be three hours ahead of eastern Australia as opposed to being 21 hours behind and 22 hours ahead of California, rather than the previous 2 hours it was behind it. In the Pacific, this tactic of shifting time is not unusual as many island nations have, at one point or another, shifted time zones, date lines, and daylight savings times. This move will make it much easier for Samoa to do business with Australia and New Zealand, which is important because their economies are linked closely to the rest of Asia, especially China. Samoa's prime minister explicitly stated that these economic factors were the driving forces behind this time change decision and the decision had nothing to do with trying to be the first country to enter the new year. I was surprised that a country could just decide this type of change at any point, but there seems to be no legal reason why a country could not do that. Whatever time zone a country feels it should enter it can, but telling the citizens about such a change seems like it would be hard to do. When everyone is accustomed to a certain time zone, I feel like making this change can have an effect on people especially those who travel. Getting used to a new time zone seems like it would take time to adjust to, but I guess for island nations in the Pacific, this is no new phenomenon as others have already engaged in these moves.

 

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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...

Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

I never knew pink lakes existed in the world. The dark green colors around this lake make the landscape appear very beautiful. The other lakes around the world, which are similar to this one, appear pink in color due to the high salinity makeup. The reasoning behind this lake’s color is still under investigation. 

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Jennifer Brown's curator insight, December 10, 6:37 PM

Lake Hillier seems like one of those bucket list must see types of places. I would however not swim in it since no one know what the cause is. Its a horror movie waiting to happen!

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 11:44 PM

The pink lake, Lake Hillier,  located in Western Australia is stunning. The aerial view of the lake makes the lake seem unreal that is was is fascinating. What gives the lake its pink color is a mystery, but it may be from bacteria, but it shows how some places in the world are affected differently than others and it produces remarkable results.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 1:48 AM

Now this is bizarre.  A pink lake and no one is really sure as to why it is pink.  It is not on the top of my list of places to go swimming, that is for sure.  Although scientists don't seem too concerned about the safety of the lake for people but are curious as to what is causing the lake to be pink.  Thoughts on algea and bacteria levels or the amount of salt are included in the potential reasoning for the pink color.  Even on google earth you can see that the lake is in fact pink.  Even when scientists come to a conclusion as to what is causing the pink colored lake, as far as it isn't causing any environmental issues, I think that the lake should be left pink as a type of wonder of the world attraction for people to see.

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In Pictures: Thailand's Songkran festival

In Pictures: Thailand's Songkran festival | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Political divisions are forgotten as New Year is celebrated with a wet and wild water nationwide fight.
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Despite the political protests that are going on in Bangkok, the people came together to celebrate Songkran. Most people are putting their political differences aside and celebrating their new year together. Celebrations such as this are great for a city, as they bring the people together for a short time. It appears once the people are done celebrating, they will continue protesting.  

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.

Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

By viewing the before and after images, one can see how destructive this typhoon was. Almost every building was absolutely destroyed and the damage looks overwhelming. Disaster's such as this can really set a country back, as the damage appears to be costly. Although sad to look at, these images were informational. 

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megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:35 PM
Looking upfront at the before and after the typhoon hit the Philipines right on the coast line. The coast was completly wiped out and destructed it looked as though nothing was ever there. Not only were homes and businesses destructed but over 2500 people were killed in this natural disaster.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 8, 1:16 PM

We know that natural disasters cause a lot of damage and personal loss but we don't really ever know how much damage is caused until we see it.  Even when we do see it if we don't know what it looked like before it really doesn't mean anything to us.  Using these before and after maps you can really understand how much destruction happened when the typhoon hit the Philippines.  You can see the loss of property, infrastructure and natural resources that were once there.  The loss of not only peoples homes, but entire neighborhoods wiped right off the map.  The remnants of roads can be seen but that is all they are, remnants.  The ability to see the before as well as the after really strikes a toll and makes people realize that this is serious and not just another storm for the people that live here.

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Laos May Bear Cost of Planned Chinese Railroad

Laos May Bear Cost of Planned Chinese Railroad | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
China wants a railroad linking it to Thailand and on to the Bay of Bengal in Myanmar, but some international groups warn that it may put a big burden on Laos.

Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

The Chinese-financed railroad is being built to pass thru Laos into the mega-city of Bangkok. China wants this railroad built to further expand its trading with Southeast Asia. Laos, a very poor and rural country may see small profits from this project. The most powerful country in this area, China, should have no problem building this railroad in its weak and poor neighboring country, Laos.  

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 4:53 PM

This article depicts the major problem between trade route going through Laos. Laos is upset because they have no input in anything even though the railways will intersect through their country by the Chinese and their railways for imports and exports. "China wants a railroad linking it to Thailand and on to the Bay of Bengal in Myanmar, but some international groups warn that it may put a big burden on Laos". China wants to link to  Bangkok and then on to the Bay of Bengal in Maymar expanding China’s  enormous trade with Southeast Asia. Creating no way for Laos to get out of this deal though there has been some hesitation there will not be any stopping the maintenance of the soon to be power railways suffocating Laos. 

 
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:18 PM

The article discusses how China’s wish to build a rail road through southeast Asia will most likely incur a high cost from the country of Laos that the rail road will go through.  China is anxious to regain its power in the area and its terms for the rail road will leave Laos severely indebted to China to such an extent that many see it as China trying to make Laos a vessel state.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 12, 2:18 AM

This is interesting, Laos pays for a railroad that they can't afford because China wants it? Now how does that make sense.  These people that barely make enough money to live as it is can no where near afford to have a railroad put through their country especially when they won't be able to reap many of the benefits.  Even with China's letting the country borrow the money to fund the project not only do they have to pay back the money but also give China minerals throughout the duration of the loan.  The people of Laos need to really think about the consequences to this railroad could be, both good and bad, for the country before any agreements are made to construct the railroad.

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Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

The first part of the video you see a train passing by. The next part of the video you see the areas around the train tracks transform into a thriving marketplace. In a mega-city such as Bangkok, one should take advantage of any available space. Most people would not use this area as a marketplace, but these people are not wasting space, as it helps them generate money from their businesses. This area along the train tracks now serves two purposes, one being the transportation from the train and the other a marketplace. 

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David Week's curator insight, August 12, 6:04 PM

I love this video. Never think that the "third world" is not more dynamic and innovative than the first!

Jeffrey Ing's curator insight, August 13, 5:12 AM

people are not giving up with inflated price of urban land. They adapt and live with it :)

 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 10:42 PM

Seeing the vendors prepared for the arrival of the train is impressive. They have grown accustomed to knowing how to avoid the train and then set up shop once again, as if the train never crossed their path. It shows how the residents use their countries entire space, it is using the land to your advantage and may even speak on crowded the city is.

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Water and Development

Australia's engagement with Asia: Water - a case study on Flores

Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

The children of this village were once sick and could not regularly wash their hands due to the fact water was hard to find, and if it was found the quality was poor. World Vision helped by building a pipeline, which brings clean drinking water to this village. They can now bathe regularly and drink clean water.

Having this clean water also benefits the community from an economic standpoint. The abundance of clean water now attracts educators to their village and it also helps with creation of bricks. These bricks can be sold and can be used for their home improvement projects. 

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Jye Watson's curator insight, June 23, 2013 10:29 PM

year 7 water

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:23 PM

In Indonesia, many areas lack clean water. This makes it hard to keep residents healthy. World Vision Australia works with Indonesian towns to set up pipelines to the clean water sources to transport it to the areas of dirty water. This helps the villages work together and benefit off having clean water to drink and uncontaminated food. This improves life in Indonesia and they are very thankful for it.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:29 PM

This video shows a positive side to globalization.  The Australian organization that worked with the people in these rural villages to get them access to clean water.  The quality of life when up hugely when the people could access water in their homes.  The hours needed to trek to the wells was eliminated and the water have created jobs and better quality of life for the villages.

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Photos of Southeast Asia

Photos of Southeast Asia | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it

This is an incredibly photo gallery of Vietnam (pictured) and Cambodia.  The photographer, Michael Poliza, has many other place and nature-based galleries at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/poliza/sets/ ;


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

By viewing these pictures of areas throughout Cambodia and Vietnam, one can grasp aspects of their culture. From the Buddha statues, historic sites and beautiful natural landscapes. This photographer does a great job of capturing important areas within Southeast Asia. These great pictures encourage people to visit these overlooked areas of the world. 

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Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 12:47 PM

Another day, another photo gallery. This time we have a stunning array of pictures from Southeast Asia, mainly from Vietnam and Cambodia. Many of these pictures showcase the importance of the sea to life in those regions, as well as the history, which is deeply involved with Buddhism, that is often glossed over in western history books.

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:35 PM

Absolutely breath taking! From the pictures from the skyline, it is hard to tell that it is inhabited due to its high elevations, but closer pictures of the land and buildings compare to other places in the world, but hold their own importance. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:59 PM

If I had a helicopter I would certainly be taking it out to see stuff like this. Vietnam is very natural looking. Its lands are filled with awesome demography and topography. What a beautiful sight to see.

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A taste of whale

A taste of whale | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Supporters of Japan's whaling program eat whale meat dishes during the 26th whale meat tasting event in Tokyo on Tuesday.…
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Japan is one of the few countries today that still hunts and eats whale. Although many frown upon whaling, it is a Japanese tradition. It appears many Japanese still want whale as part of their diet and some plan to continue hunting in 2015. Eating whale does not seem enjoyable to me, but apparently the people of Japan enjoy eating whale, along with many other seafood’s.  

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In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms

In the East China Sea, a Far Bigger Test of Power Looms | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
In an era when the United States has been focused on new forms of conflict, the dangerous contest suddenly erupting in the East China Sea seems almost like a throwback to the Cold War.

Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

This article explains the conflicts occurring in the East China Sea between China, Japan and other countries. China may want these small islands to expand its territory in the sea. They may want them in the hopes of finding natural gas near these areas. Also, claiming these islands would allow China to control more of the East China Sea which surrounds these islands and therefore expanding its military presence. 

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:29 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:38 PM

There will always be problems with every country. China needs to focus on their new issues and deal with them properly.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 5:35 PM

As China grows more aggressive in its territorial claims, Japan and South Korea are both adjusting their militaries to fit the situation. Both countries are expanding their military presence throughout the disputed region as they worry about China's expansion. The article states that China may be attempting to push American presence further away from their shores, and explains the increasing tensions between the two.

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Fiji Water Backtracks, Will Remain In Fiji

Fiji Water Backtracks, Will Remain In Fiji | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
SUVA, Fiji — Fiji Water reopened its operations in the South Pacific nation of Fiji on Wednesday – just two days after closing its bottling plant and laying off 400 workers in a row over a major government tax increase. The U.S.-owned company said after meeting with Fiji's leaders it has agreed to "comply" with the hefty tax hike imposed on it by Fiji's military-led regime.
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Due to a tax increase, Fiji Water has fired 400 workers. Fiji's government announced it was commanding a new tax rate of 15 cents per liter on companies extracting more than 3.5 million liters of water per month. The water comes from Fiji's mainland and Fiji Water is very popular in the United States. 

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Mixing Past And Present In Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea, once home to cannibals, still has an exotic aura. The local tourist economy caters to those notions, and visitors may see a hybrid of the traditional and the modern.

 

This story is an intriguing blend--we see traditional cultures engaging in the global economy. They have created two villages: a traditional one designed for tourism filled with emblems of their folk cultures, and another one where people work, live eat and play with various markers of outside cultural and technological influence.

 

"Tourists are taking pictures. They don't want to take pictures of those who are in Western clothes.  People who are in Western clothes are not allowed to get close to people who are dressed up in the local dressings."

 

Questions to Ponder: Which village do you see as the more "authentic" one? How can culture also be a commodity?

 

Tags: folk culture, tourism, indigenous, culture, economic, rural, historical, unit 3 culture, Oceania.


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

The tourists visiting Papua New Guinea enjoy visiting the villages where people are supposedly living in the past. I am sure some visitors still believe these villagers are still cannibals. People years ago once came here and told the ancient villagers to abandon their culture and leave their religion behind. Today, tourists are visiting and paying to see these villagers living in the past.   

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, December 16, 7:30 PM

The different villages that represent different times in which Papua New Guinea lived in is great for tourism. The one town is like the developed and tourist town where people stay. The other town right next door to the tourist town represents the present day traditional town that tourists expect what Papua New Guinea is like. It’s almost like it is a planned out set up attract tourists to that town to get the full cultural Papua New Guinea experience. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 1:27 AM

Having two villages in one in Papua New Guinea is an interesting concept.  One village has people living in the present and the other has people living in the past, the village that tourists want to see.  They come to this village and see half naked natives carving canoes, cooking over open fires, and other things that happened in the past.  This is beneficial because they are able to keep the culture alive, the language is able to still be used and traditions are kept from disappearing.  Unfortunately for these people they have seen western more modern life and don't like living in this past for the pleasure of tourists.  First we come in and take away their traditions, clothes and languages and now we come back begging for them to not leave any of it behind, well except the cannibalism. 

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 7:54 PM

It frustrates me sometimes when Europeans, and Westerners travel to an uncommon land and expect the inhabitant of the land to act in barbaric ways. With the tourist who visit the land of Papua New Guinea, they are often times expecting the natives to act in an uncivilized manner, such as being cannibalistic. Yet, the natives have made great stride to keep up with the ever changing world in which they are a part of. One of the concerns that the elders have with the upcoming generation is how long will it be before their native language vanishes completely. One thing I can appreciate about the native people of this land is their capability to cast tourist from entering or engaging with the natives while they are in their native clothing. 

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New Zealand oil spill

New Zealand oil spill | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
View New Zealand oil spill pictures on Yahoo! News. See New Zealand oil spill photos and find more pictures in our photo galleries.

 

There are many geographic applications in this…Environment, globalization, economies of scale, etc.


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

These images of the New Zealand oil spill are sad to see. It seems oil spills are occurring more and more throughout the world. Large ships holding oil should be inspected closely before going out to sea to prevent accidents such as this one from occurring. 

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Louis Culotta's comment, January 25, 2013 1:20 PM
I was reading that in the last few weeks they have had all time record high temps either side of 100 over the last few weeks when a hot day would normally be in the low 80's due to the very cold oceans that surround the two main islands.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 23, 6:40 PM

This gallery of photos show the cargo tumbling into the waters of New Zealand causing the oil spill. It is crazy to see each cargo container tip and a ship of such great mass go down. 

Market Talk's comment, September 16, 1:47 AM
15/09/2014
Kea Petroleum PLC(kea) MEO Australia expected to spud and re-enter Puka-3 in late September
MEO Australia Limited has executed a contract with Drill Force New Zealand Ltd for the re-drilling of Puka-3.
Drilling of Puka-3 has been followed by a significant amount of analysis by both Kea and MEO of the logging information gained from the well. The drilling of the well has validated the geological model for predicting the location of thicker sands.
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Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years

Six-Legged Giant Finds Secret Hideaway, Hides For 80 Years | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
The insect is so large — as big as a human hand — it's been dubbed a "tree lobster." It was thought to be extinct, but some enterprising entomologists scoured a barren hunk of rock in the middle of the ocean and found surviving Lord Howe Island...

 

"Island Biogeography is endlessly fascinating and provides some of the most striking species we have on Earth.  The physical habitat is fragmented and the genetic diversity is limited.  Within this context, species evolve to fill ecological niches within their particular locale.  This NPR article demonstrates the story of but one of these incredible species that never could have evolved on the continents.  In modern society, more extinctions are happening on islands than anywhere else as 'specialist' species are in greater competition with 'generalists.' "

 

perharps by a simple twist of fate these long six legged giant bugs have survived in the most unlikliest of places. A former volcano with a handful of shurbs that could support these insects all these years has kept them going until our intervention. this is a great story and hofully it will have a goo ending.

Joshua Choiniere


Via Seth Dixon, Joshua Choiniere
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

On Ball's Pyramid the stick insect is different than any other insect I have seen. The size of it is terrifying, as it as big as a human hand. There are many different kinds of animals or insects someone can find on remote islands, islands such as Madagascar, Australia and even on this small island, which is located off of Australia's coast in the Pacific.    

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:56 PM

When reading I found out that they call it "Ball's Pyramid"because that is what is left from the last volcano that emerged from the sea about 7 million years ago."British naval officer named Ball was the first European to see it in 1788. It sits off Australia, in the South Pacific. It is extremely narrow, 1,844 feet high, and it sits alone.

What's more, for years this place had a secret. At 225 feet above sea level, hanging on the rock surface, there is a small, spindly little bush, and under that bush, a few years ago, two climbers, working in the dark, found something totally improbable hiding in the soil below. How it got there, we still don't know."

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 8:33 PM

This article freeked me out at first.  The idea of hand sized bugs is just…yuck!  But after reading the article I found it very interesting.  That these bugs managed to survive on a single bush on an island isolated from the world.  The description of them as acting un-buglike by peering off into couples that sleep cuddling with each other is just kind of cool.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 4:40 PM

Isolation can lead to some remarkable examples of evolution. This "tree lobster" is an example of that. On an island cut off from many predators and hold little resources, the tree lobster has found a way to survive.

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Few people populate most of Australia’s land, which appears yellow on this map. The 2% who live in this large area must be self-sufficient, as I am sure there are not many stores one can buy goods from. Most of the yellow area is dry land and receives small amounts rainfall. Many dangerous snakes and spiders live in the yellow area, as well. By looking at the rainfall map, one can understand why many people live on the outer edges of Australia. 

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Jennifer Brown's curator insight, December 10, 6:28 PM

An entire continent and only 2% of the population is living in the yellow? That's insane! If needed would the population be able to survive in yellow if they accommodated the people with shelter, water, and a means of survival? I think I personally would want maybe a "summer" house in the yellow to get away from everyone and everything once in awhile. It would be like going to the countryside!

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 11:20 AM

While Australia may large in area, little of that land can actually be inhabited. Since populations are often tied to precipitation and therefore agricultural potential, the "Outback" of Australia is not suitable for large populations. Unforgiving desert climates mixed with rough terrain cannot provide appropriate food growth, therefore limiting population growth. On the other hand, much of the coast contains ample enough rainfall as well as soil quality in order to produce food. Also, the allocation of major cities near the coasts have allowed for increased development due to trade, transportation, and tourism.  

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 16, 9:52 PM

This image shows that geography can greatly affect where a population settles and is concentrated.  Living along the coast provides many benefits and resources for those who live there.  Heavy rainfall and other dangerous biogeographic factors keep people from settling in the yellow area of the continent. 

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Turmoil in Thailand

Joseph Thacker 's insight:

It appears some people of Thailand are protesting against the government in Bangkok. These people are trying to shut the city down in effort to force the Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra to step aside. The people want to clean up the corruption before the elections take place. These protests could hurt the country's tourism industry, as people may not want to visit under these conditions. 

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The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Due to the fact the Philippines is made up of over 7,000 islands, it makes aid response very difficult. When natural disasters such as typhoons occur in the Philippines it can negatively affect hundreds of islands, making it difficult to help the people on every island. It can takes days for supplies to arrive on some of the islands, and sometimes people do not even receive necessary supplies such as food and water. Countries, which are composed of numerous islands, face many challenges.  

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:26 PM

Access to this area is inhibited due to massive devastation, and there was a LOT of damage done.  These people have needs, and it seems that due to the large geographic spread, it would be near impossible to get these people what they need.  I think if our world revolved less around mandated activity- school, work (specifically the low level jobs that we don't NEED in our society), etc.- that more people could be freed up to help proactively come up with solutions to potential devastation, and groups could be formed, equipped, and trained to deal with whatever Nature could throw at people.  If people didn't work at McDonalds, and they DID work at some sort of international rescue agency, doing all the research on all areas of the world ahead of time, the solutions to these problems (and even prevention) could be at hand within a month of a global task force's initiation into the activity.  I know some Americans think that they need workers at McDonalds, but really... They could be working for something larger than the government- the entire human race.  I'm sure people would be willing to fund such an agency (not just some limited range minimal UN task force, but rather a world-wide formally designated occupation), and I'm equally sure that people would rather work there than flipping burgers and changing french fry oil.  I don't think that the current relief programs are enough to help people in such situations of tragedy as those that were relied on to take care of the issue in the Phillipines, and I think a simple restructuring of society (our society) would yield a greater level of concern and involvement in the welfare of others, as well as greater aid to the species.  Who knows, perhaps one of the people that we could save in the Phillipines is a person who goes on to change the world- an inventor of something new, a holy or political leader, or the scientist that cures cancer?  All this could be made to matter to us more if society were tweaked, even slightly, just to allow people to want to help others.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:59 PM

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 7:09 PM

Fortunately, the Philippines has a relatively stable infrastructure so even though lots of areas were hit, the human fatalities and issues are not as bad as they could have been. Unfortunately, these are many islands and getting from one to the next is very difficult when all communications and landing areas are compromised.

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Thailand flood reaches Bangkok

Thailand flood reaches Bangkok | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Flood waters inundating Thailand north of Bangkok since July have made the journey south and reached the capital. The disaster is responsible for 400 deaths in Thailand and neighboring Cambodia and Vietnam.

 

Too much of a good thing (water) can literally be disastrous. 


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:
This flood started in northern Thailand and made its way south and affected the country’s capitol, Bangkok. When a large flood hits a country’s mega-city, it causes serious economic impacts. Also, Thailand is the world's biggest rice exporter, but the floods have destroyed over a quarter of the country's crops. Damages from this flood caused billions of dollars worth of damage.
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Catherine Shabo's curator insight, May 3, 2013 12:47 PM

This goes to show how this problem happens to many regions across Earth. What Thailand is experiencing in these photos is something that is happening in many places. Flooding and rising of water leves is increasingly becoming a problem and it becomes even more of a problem when it is ruining their rice crops that take a long time to mend and take care of.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 5:01 PM

This flood being record breaking it was a flood that reached from Thailand to Bangkok. Seen from the images it was long lasting and took a toll of 400 deaths from this horrible disaster.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 20, 9:15 PM

The flooding that has been going on since July, has now reached Bangkok. It is the cause to over about 400 deaths. The flooding has flooded over a quarter of Thailand's rice crops, and rice is their biggest exporter. The government has given the people a 5 day period to evacuate the area. These damages are sought to cost about 6 billion dollars. I looked at all of the pictures presented in the article and a couple of them really stood out to me. One thing that caught my eye was the animals. Along with the flood and the destruction, also comes the animals that live in the water. there are pictures of snakes and crocodiles or alligators that the people in Thailand have caught. Another picture that caught my eye was the pictures of the streets and roads. I looks like Venice out there! The streets are completely flooded and all the people have their own little rafts that they now have to call home now since their homes are destroyed from the flooding. the last photo i liked was the kid (assuming from arm size that it's a kid) carrying money in one hand while his head was fully submerged in the water. This shows to me how flooded some places were that people couldn't even touch the ground to walk, but he had to swim under water to keep the money dry for whatever he was going to purchase. Its terrible what these people are going through over in Thailand.

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Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic

Unusual ways to avoid Jakarta's traffic | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Jakarta's traffic is legendary and locals have now become experts at finding ways to get around the jams, with some even making money out of them.

 

The population of Indonesia is heavily concentrated on the island of Java, and the capital city of Jakarta faces a tremendous strain on it's transportation network.  This video show that resourceful people will find inventive ways to make an unworkable situation manageable. 


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Jakarta is faced with overpopulation and traffic problems. The government passed a law, which requires a vehicle to have passengers aboard, in the hopes of speeding up the traffic entering the city. However, some drivers are paying people to take a ride with them into the city to avoid the fines. In most areas throughout the world, passengers would be paying the driver for a ride, but in this city, it is different. The government should find another solution to fix the traffic issues. 

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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 1:12 PM

As urban population growth rises, transportation systems will be put under greater strain. Jakarta's transportation crisis is one of the worst in the world, and people sit in traffic for hours traveling to work or to do errands. Due to incompetencies in the system, people are finding different ways to make travel easier. Motorbike cabs as well as people standing on street corners offering to be passengers in order for cars to travel in the car-pool lanes are two ways people are getting around. These underground transportation services are illegal, but their extent cannot be contained by law enforcement. 

 

Jakarta, as well as many other cities, are continuing to grow due to the global trend of people moving into urban areas. With more people than ever choosing to reside in cities instead of rural areas, new transportation systems will need to be developed in order to accommodate for growth.  

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:35 PM

The amount of traffic in Jakarta is staggering and the traffic itself has built up a business of making commuting to work easier. What is troubling is that the government hasn't made enough of an effort to fix the problem of traffic in its largest and most economically viable city. If Jakarta wants to keep growing the government has to step in and find a way to make getting to work realistic for Indonesians.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 9:38 PM

The traffic in Jakarta is insane, to be in a constant standstill on your way to work is unreal. The reporter in the video says that if the city of Jakarta continues on its current path, it could be "in a state of Paralysis" which for an entire city is not good. The traffic has, for some, become a way to make money, illegally but money nonetheless.

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Urbanization and Megacities: Jakarta

"This case study examines the challenges of human well-being and urbanization, especially in the megacity of Jakarta."


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

Jakarta is the capitol of Indonesia and now has a population of over 28 million. Urbanization is bringing serious problems to Indonesia’s only mega city, such as poor access to clean water and housing, and overpopulation. Some people, including the young woman in this video are living with 16 or more people in one house. It seems the city is not providing enough affordable housing for its residents.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 26, 2013 10:40 AM

Just seems to be a pattern with any mega city.  People move to the city for a better life.  Even though there is overcrowding and lack of infrastructure in these growing cities they feel it is a better life than the rural areas.  They still need the infrastructure from the government but this group has been training the people there to go and make the changes for themselves oh what they can control.  They are giving them the skills they need to make changes.  They now need to use those skills to get the government to make the necessary infrastructure changes that the government knows are needed.  They know the people are flooding to the cities and they see the promblem, but nothing wil be done until the people demand the changes that are necessary.  It can happen, might take time but it can happen..just ask the Romanov family of Russia..oh wait..they are not there...

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 5:16 PM

In megacities, such as Jakarta, urbanization brings about many problems for local residents. The areas are crowded and residents get little to no income. An Australian organization works to help the people of Jakarta by giving them advice,food and helping where necessary. With this help, families are able to keep their spirits higher and hope that their children will live better lives than the ways that they were brought up.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:25 PM

It is nice to see an organization that is not just blindly giving resources to people in need but actually empowering them and training them to be able to get the things they need through work. The women in this story describe how they have learned to make and sell things in order to take care of their families and they describe how empowering that feels.

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Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

A former gang member from Long Beach, California, teaches break dancing to at-risk youth in Cambodia.

 

This video is a great example of cross-cultural interactions in the era of globalization.  Urban youth culture of the United States is spread to Cambodia through a former refugee (with a personally complex political geography).  What geographic themes are evident in this video? How is geography being reshaped and by what forces?


Via Seth Dixon
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

This man was originally from California, but was kicked out of America and now lives in Cambodia. “KK” introduces break dancing, rapping and even taught basic computer skills to the at risk children of Cambodia. The children are some of the best break-dancers I have ever seen. A man by the name of "KK" inspired and gave the youth of Cambodia hope. 

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James Hobson's curator insight, December 4, 8:34 PM

(Southeast Asia topic 7)

A gang member who gets deported and ends up being a positive role model for kids? I didn't see that coming!

This video is similar to the Scoop of the introduction of skateboarding to the Afghanistan. Both offer something foreign as a tool for both betterment and enjoyment, and this seems to be exactly what kids in these regions need. Though perhaps on a micro-scale, this can be argued as an example of globalization. And in this case, it seems pretty obvious that its impacts are for the better.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 4:10 PM

In Cambodia, this previous gang member has found a way of taking kids off the street and teaching them how to break dance. This is interesting because it is a cultural solution to crime. This man was deported to Cambodia and with him brought break dancing. In doing so this cultural mixing is used as a way to teach at risk youth a hobby that keeps them away from crime and drugs.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 4:40 PM

Very similar to the previous cricket article this video shows another way those in areas of poverty and crime are pulled together and united. In this case instead of a sport it is break dancing. This dancing amongst former gang members helps to relieve tension form the area and also hopefully lead them to achieve better and loftier things. By shifting the priorities of people away from harm to themselves and others and replacing it with an activity which focuses on self improvement and community.

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Photos From Space: At Night, North Korea Goes Black

Photos From Space: At Night, North Korea Goes Black | RIC World Regional Geography | Scoop.it
When the sun exits the sky over North Korea, the nation goes dark.
Joseph Thacker 's insight:

This is a sad reality. One can see by looking at these satellite images how underdeveloped North Korea appears. The differences between South Korea and North Korea are enormous. South Korea has thriving cities and a mega-city (Seoul). They have a decent economy and exports/imports many goods. North Korea on the other hand has a horrible economy, no thriving cities and the country cannot even supply their people with enough food.  

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