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Catalonia asks Spain for 9 Billion Euros

Catalonia asks Spain for 9 Billion Euros | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
The independence-minded region of Catalonia asks the Spanish central government for an extra 9bn euros (£7.7bn) in bailout money.

Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

This is sad news for an area that is trying to persuede the world it deserves to be independent. Unfortunately,  they still have to rely on the Spanish government to help their economy, something that does not help their case.  While other countries do take money from other powers, one that is trying to establish itself might want to have a more optimistic outlook on it's economy before it tries to go off on it's own.

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Dean Haakenson's curator insight, February 4, 2013 2:31 PM

Another peg in the collective EU coffin...

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:28 AM

This area seems to want it both ways.  To be independent from Spain, but also dependent economically on Spain.  This region should sort out its priorities and decided if independents is worth it and if so then they should not be asking Spain for help.  It’s like a twenty-something person that moves out of their parents’ house and then comes back again and again with their hand out.  Catalonia seems to be facing this same issue.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 9:00 PM

Catalonia, an independent region wants Spain to give them 9 billion euros in order to help them stay out of debt, but also want to keep themselves independent of Spain. The most interesting aspect of this article is how the region of Catalonia wants to be independent, but still seek help from the very place it wants to be independent from.

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Video -- Dive into the Deep

March 26, 2012—In a state-of-the-art submersible, National Geographic explorer-in-residence and filmmaker James Cameron reached the deepest point of the Mariana Trench, breaking a world record for the deepest solo dive.

 

For those who haven't been following National Geographic news, James Cameron (director of "Titanic" and "The Abyss") entered a submarine named DEEPSEA CHALLENGER, and dove to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, the deepest point on Earth. Enjoy this video describing this "lunar-like" environment that is so deep it is lightless and near lifeless with extreme pressure. For more on the expedition, read: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/03/120326-james-cameron-mariana-trench-challenger-deepest-lunar-sub-science/


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

It is mind boggling how much of our oceans are still to be discovered. Cameron's journey here is one that needs to be taken all over the world. We have more ocean that is unexplored than explored.  We may also find some answers to fundamental questions to human existence if we are able to research the deep sea more effectively.  It is hard to believe we have been able to research 36,000 feet below and still have more questions than answers. 

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Michelle Carvajal's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:12 PM

This is amazing! I love the fact there isalways one person willing to rishk his own life just to gain more knowledge of the world we live in. The Mariana Trench is definteley a scary place and by it being the deepest trench in the world, I can see why not many would consider going down there. I am looking forward to the release of any videos that may come from this expedition he took. - M. Carvajal

Brett Sinica's curator insight, December 10, 2013 5:06 PM

When the show South Park has made an entire episode based around you, you've certainly done something extraordinary.  James Cameron not only risked his life,  but proved a point and set a new standard in underwater exploration.  In a way, he literally went to the bottom of the earth, something that has been a mystical feat until now.  With technology advancing so quickly and people constantly pushing limits and standards it makes us wonder what will be discovered next.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 4:44 PM

This is a really cool video, the pressure that exist at the bottom of the ocean has kept humans trapped above a certain depth. Today technology has let us explore areas that have been off limits in the past. Letting an influential filmmaker like Cameron do this is a way to raise awareness about these expeditions to the pop culture obsessed audiences around the world.

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LEAKED NORTH KOREAN DOCUMENTARY ‘EXPOSES WESTERN PROPAGANDA' (AND IT'S SCARY HOW TRUE IT IS)

LEAKED NORTH KOREAN DOCUMENTARY ‘EXPOSES WESTERN PROPAGANDA' (AND IT'S SCARY HOW TRUE IT IS) | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
An anti-western documentary, allegedly leaked to a South Korean tourist by agents of the North posing as defectors has emerged and been translated to English. And god is it scary just how right they have all of it, down to the letter.
Ryan Amado's insight:

I stumbled upon this last year, it is a North Korean documentary that highlights how our socities in the west use propganda to control it's citizens.  While the documentary itself is propaganda used to control the North Korean citizens, and is very exaggerant, it raises some very true questions about our society. 

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What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline

What Pollution? Hong Kong Tourists Pose With Fake Skyline | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
Picture this: Tourists visiting one of your city's most prominent attractions are unable to see it because of smog, haze and a bevy of other airborne pollutants. What's the solution?

Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

The efforts of the Chinese government to cut corners and save money in every project they do has lead to the high amount of pollution in the countries urbanized cities. They surely do not have the enviornment in mind when drawing up  policies, instead only the best interests of their country.  Until China cleans up it's factories and uses safer appraoches to construction, this problem will continue.  The tourists will continue to take pictures in front of panoramas and will be unable to see the skyline of most of the cities they visit.

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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 13, 11:01 PM

This story is amazingly disheartening to me. It seems it is actually more important to some people to take a perfect vacation picture than address the real issue. I think this backdrop is very misleading to people who will view these pictures and should be a wake up call to those who pose in front of it. More should be done to decrease the pollution from fossil fuels etc.

 

As a country that obviously views a blue skyline and beautiful city view as a thing of value I would think it would be important to want to have that in real life. I can not imagine to many people wanting to go or come back to a place that is so polluted that you have to pose in front of a backdrop to get a descent picture.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 17, 8:50 PM

Seeing how Hong Kong is suffering from a pollution problem as severe as they are is interesting, but realizing that they need to disguise their problem with a backdrop of what the city skyline should look like for tourists. Hong Kong's geography and location was a contributing factor because of the surrounding bodies of water, the pollution was a result of tropical storm Trami and also made the haze worse in Hong Kong.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 11:10 PM

This is beyond absurd.  Put up a picture of what the landscape should look like so people can take pictures instead of dealing with the real problem at hand.  There seems to be a problem with that idea right there.  I understand that a tourist wants to take pictures and document their trip and in some cases may not be able to take a picture of the landscape because it is so covered in pollution to see, but that is a reason to fix the pollution problem not set up a fake picture.  The pollution in China is doing more harm than making it difficult for a tourist to take pictures but it is harming the people that live there.  The amount of very dangerous days that they have that toxic chemicals and the like are in the air is ridiculous.  This is the air that people are breathing in.  It should be more of a concern to leaders that the people that live in China are potentially facing very serious health problems because of the pollution than it seems to be.  Constructing a wall with a fake skyline does not fix any actual problem.  Yes now they can get a decent picture of their trip, but everyone is still suffering the consequences from real problem.

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

Malala surely deserves every accolade she has received from her efforts to improve the education of women in Pakistan.  Not only did she stand up to the powers that kept her down, but she continued to do so even after those powers put a bullet in her head. She's an inspiration for all girls not only in Pakistan, but in every place where this is still an issue. 

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:09 PM

I really love this article because the young girl being interviewed is angry and has had enough of the sexism in Pakistan. Malala Yousafzai has definitely become a role model for girls in her homeland and she has advanced girl's education by a large margin during her fight. The school systems in Pakistan are lacking because of the environments and the materials teachers focus on and Pakistani boys get a very different education in their religious schools but the girls have begun to work harder to equal up to them and make it to universities.  There are still many restrictions on the jobs women can take but girls are beginning to fight that too.  Pakistan has now had female political officials which has shown the generations of schoolgirls that they can truly do anything they set their minds too and Malala has helped prove that the movement can't be stopped by surviving her assassination attempt and continuing to campaign. 

Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”

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Mali in Crisis

Mali in Crisis | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
France is ready to stop Islamist militants who control northern Mali, the French president says, following a plea for help by his Malian counterpart.

Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

What also was very dangerous about this was that Mali became a safe haven for terrorist groups such as Al-Qaeda,  because of their Islamic ties to the rebels.  If we allow them to control this region, who knows what they could plan.  We spent all this time making them run, giving them a new base would undo a lot of work that has been done in the past 12 years. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 11, 2013 9:57 AM

In April 2012, Islamist rebels seized power in Northern Mali and have declared independence, proclaiming this region The Islamic State of Azawad.  Recently they have begun to amass armies on the southern limits of their territory and presumably are seeking to topple all of Mali.  The former colonizer, France is being called upon to assist as is the United Nations.  This area is part of a region known as the Sahel, the transition from a dry North Africa to tropical Sub-Saharan Africa, from a Muslim/Arab north to a Christian/Animist/Black region of Africa.  The human and physical geographic divisions in this region plays a major role in this conflict.  


Tags: Mali, Africa, political, conflict, war.

Josephine Castro's curator insight, September 12, 2013 2:35 AM

Islamist militants control Northern Mali

 

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Russians illegally climb Egyptian pyramids and take photos from the top - Lost At E Minor: For creative people

Russians illegally climb Egyptian pyramids and take photos from the top - Lost At E Minor: For creative people | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
Apparently, a group of very determined Russians made it to the top of the pyramids in Cairo, Egypt, and crowned their achievement by taking these amazing p
Ryan Amado's insight:

This here is a test of one's bravery.  These men who illegally climbed the pyramids in Cairo were able to take some breathtaking pictures of one of the worlds most ancient historical landmarks.  You can see just how isolated the Egytpian govenment has kept them, as the city lines are far enough away not to engulf the area of the pyramids. 

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Using Humor to Learn

Iranian-American comedian Maz Jobrani takes to the TEDxSummit stage in Doha, Qatar to take on serious issues in the Middle East -- like how many kisses to give when saying “Hi,” and what not to say on an American airplane.

Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

This comedian sure does his best job at showing that the Middle East is not the chaotic war zone we see on American television every day, and what a better place to do it in than Qatar, a place where he would have a very diverse audience.  He made light of each race in the audience, drawing laughs instead of slander. He made jokes about Lebanese, Qataris, Saudis, and Iranians, amongst others.  This really broke many of the stereotypes that exist about people of Middle Eastern descent in our society. Instead of seeing them protesting or fighting amongst themselves, we see them enjoying each other’s company just as every race in America does every day.  

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 30, 10:25 PM

This man is brilliant in getting some pretty serious points across.  Talking about a very serious issue with people can be really difficult to do, but Jobrani uses humor to get his point across.  He talks about the differences in greeting people in countries, and about how even in Qatar he couldn't find any Qataris that worked there.  Everyone seemed to be from another country that he encountered.  He also discussed the fear that Americans had for 'brown' people, not just Muslim's but just people who may appear to maybe look like a Muslim.  That's hard to hear, for anybody but with the use of his humor and talking about how you should throw random fun English words into your Arabic conversations and you'll be all set, it makes the whole situation a little bit easier to handle.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 1:45 PM

Maz Jobrani uses population geography, political geography and cultural geography in his comedy. In Doha, Qatar there are massive influxes of workers leads to many of the workers in Qatar not being Qatari, he jokes about many different ethnicities greeting him when he got into Doha all of which are not Doha. This reflects real population geography changes taking place in Doha, because of its growing economy more people are going to Doha to work. He touches upon cultural differences in regards to the number of kisses each country in the Middle East is customary. As Westerners we tend to generalize the Middle East, Maz Jobrani challenges those stereotypes in his stand up and shed light on the predujices that Americans have with regards to people from the Middle East. His Hi-jack joke highlights just that.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 9, 9:27 PM

This video is interesting, in that, this comedian is tackling the subject of multiple cultures in the Middle East. Maz Jobrani illustrates the cultural differences between countries and how the Middle East is portrayed in the Western media, as a very serious society who never has any fun, but it shows the entire crowd (which was diverse) laughing and not fitting into that media stereotype.

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NBC Will Turn A Spotlight On Russia’s Antigay Abuses During Winter Olympics

NBC Will Turn A Spotlight On Russia’s Antigay Abuses During Winter Olympics | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
It is seldom that we have good news to report about Russia, so we're pleased to note that NBC is starting to pay more attention to the country's antigay abuse.

Via Pete
Ryan Amado's insight:

It is time Moscow recognized that the world does not approve of this kind of abuse.  Not giving homosexuals rights is one thing, brutalizing them is another, and to possibly ruin the sanctity of an event such as the Olympics because of an intolerant regime is beyond asanine. NBC's decision to expose this is bold, but necessary. 

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50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster

50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
50 Pictures Of Chernobyl 25 Years After The Nuclear Disaster: Today marks the 25th anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. ...

 

A haunting gallery that displays the effects of environmental and political mismanagement. 


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

These photo's are rather gripping.  Many of the images seen here are of objects that have not moved or been touched in 25 years.  The entire population of Pripyat had to pack their bags and leave all in an instant. The chaos that must have ensued after the nuclear meltdown must have been haunting. Pripyat will remain like this for years to come, and one can imagine what it will look like in 25 more years.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:55 PM

I was 15 when this happened.  The scare of fallout was huge as this was a total meltdown.  I also remember Three Mile Island, PA in 1979 where the scare was not as big as it was only a partial meltdown.  Today though it is the newly independant countires of the Ukraine and Belarus, former Soviet republics, that have to deal with the long term issues.  The pictures here are just errie, like this place just stopped in time and since in can't be inhabited for 10,000 years, it will always look like 1986!

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:51 PM

Absolutely frightening to see a city so empty.  To only imgine what could have been in Chernobyl today if this nuclear disaster didn't happen.

Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 20, 2013 3:03 PM

The pictures are breathtaking.  What was once a modern and prosperous area is now completely devestated and basically irreparable for hundreds of years to come.  In some of the pictures it is possible to see the haste and desertion of buildings and rooms which gives a sense of fear and panic that the people experienced.  There is surely still so much that can be explored, but the radiation limits people and the danger of the area is hard for civilians to be within the boundaries of Chernobyl.  Places like this show how drastic the rise and fall of the Soviet Union really was.  Similar to mono-towns in Siberia, these areas were set up for people to flourish and become successful, but as history went on and disasters ensued, the great empire came crashing down.

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Leaked EU Docs & Draconian Regulations. Is This the End of the E-Cig in Europe?

Leaked EU Docs & Draconian Regulations. Is This the End of the E-Cig in Europe? | RIC Geography | Scoop.it

The twists and turns of the EU are starting to leave our European vaping cousins not only enraged, but also stupefied and incredulous at what is being proposed.

 

It appears that the Commission – one of the legislative arms of the EU, not only want to ban electronic cigarettes, they also want to make sure nobody can talk about them either.

 

There are basically three legislative arms to the EU Parliament –1) The Commission; they oversee law. 2) The elected Members of Parliament (MEPs), and 3) The Council, that is made up from Ministers from the 28 EU countries.  Countries take turns in presiding over the EU, rotating every 6 months.


Via GolfKahn
Ryan Amado's insight:

Legislation on E-cigs has come later than it should have.  Many people are being misinformed about these products.  They are sold as safe replacements for normal cigerettes.  However, if one smokes them as often as they smoke in a day (say, the amount of hits a pack of cigarettes takes), they are inhaling dangerous amounts of nicotine.  Something needs to be done about this dire health risk. 

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Catalonia asks Spain for 9 Billion Euros

Catalonia asks Spain for 9 Billion Euros | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
The independence-minded region of Catalonia asks the Spanish central government for an extra 9bn euros (£7.7bn) in bailout money.

Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

This is sad news for an area that is trying to persuede the world it deserves to be independent. Unfortunately,  they still have to rely on the Spanish government to help their economy, something that does not help their case.  While other countries do take money from other powers, one that is trying to establish itself might want to have a more optimistic outlook on it's economy before it tries to go off on it's own.

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Dean Haakenson's curator insight, February 4, 2013 2:31 PM

Another peg in the collective EU coffin...

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:28 AM

This area seems to want it both ways.  To be independent from Spain, but also dependent economically on Spain.  This region should sort out its priorities and decided if independents is worth it and if so then they should not be asking Spain for help.  It’s like a twenty-something person that moves out of their parents’ house and then comes back again and again with their hand out.  Catalonia seems to be facing this same issue.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 30, 9:00 PM

Catalonia, an independent region wants Spain to give them 9 billion euros in order to help them stay out of debt, but also want to keep themselves independent of Spain. The most interesting aspect of this article is how the region of Catalonia wants to be independent, but still seek help from the very place it wants to be independent from.

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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | RIC Geography | Scoop.it

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."


Via Neal G. Lineback, Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

Here we can see that the continental boundary between Russia and the rest of Europe has historically been solely based on national borders. However, a large majority of Russia's population and major cities are in the western part of the country, which is closer to Europe than most Asian countries.  Because of this, Europe and Asia gained an imaginary cultural border. It only makes sense that part of Russia began to be considered a European region even though it physically is a part of Asia.  It is better to talk about the entire land mass of Eurasia rather than two split continents when talking about Russia's borders.

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 14, 2013 1:29 PM
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shawn Giblin's curator insight, July 15, 2013 9:42 AM

very interesting to think that Turkey is a transcontinental country, as well to find out that asia and europe are actually connected.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 11:06 AM

I find this discussion very interesting.  How we define the boarders of the continents may not seem important but they do hold much in the way of historical and cultural meanings.  Is Europe separate from Asia or is it one super-continent?  The answer to that has many implications politically and culturally as well as historically.

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Uruguay’s government, new pot dealer on the block

Uruguay’s government, new pot dealer on the block | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
Amsterdam, eat your heart out. This South American country has big plans for marijuana fans.

 

The distribution of narcotics impacts virtually every country in the world; there are incredibly divergent strategies on how to mitigate these problems that are a result of sophisticated distribution networks.  What is the best way to stop the flow of dangerous drugs and the illegal activities that accompany the drug trade?  If you were in charge, what strategies would you recommend? 


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

Uruguay is definitely taking steps in the right direction here.  Instead of leaving drugs in the hands of street dealers and cartels, they are putting them in regulated establishments.  One could argue this is only going to promote drug use, but it will do the exact opposite.  Marijuana is proven to be safer than alcohol, and is wildly popular.  Uruaguay will soon see a decline, in crime, hard drug use, and an increase in social capital and most likey appetite.  

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Nick Flanagan's curator insight, December 12, 2012 9:44 PM

I like how they feel that the prohibition on marijuana just made the use of it worse.  I feel like that is a problem in many countries, people only want to do it because it's illegal and it makes them look like a rebel.  Also it's only marijuana I mean thats barely a drug anyway, it's not like they legalized cocaine or heroin something that can cause harmful damage to a person's body.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 17, 10:36 AM

This article is interesting in it is a different view of how a government should combat drug related violence.  The idea that to legalize lesser drugs will bring down the demand for harder illegal drugs is an interesting stance.  The hope is this will cut the feet out from under the dangerous and violent drug cartels and bring down the crime rate in Uruguay.  It will be interesting to see what comes of this move.

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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

This line clearly needs to be redrawn.  It just does not make sense that it could be monday in one area and tuesday 50 miles directly south of it.  While the new dateline does not necessarily have to be perfectly straight, it should at least not go directly horizontal as it does now.  Whoever lies on the line must deal with whatever place they have been placed in, and not complain.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 4:42 PM

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:05 AM

My class examined this and we agree that it makes sense that American Samoa would want to be those they do business with like Asia, Australia and New Zealand.  ALthough American Samoa is a US territory, it definately does more business with the countries who are nearby and therefore they should be pushed to the other side of the dateline.

James Hobson's curator insight, December 8, 9:43 AM

(Oceania topic 4)

A convenience for some is a headache for others. Ironically, a region known for its early historical maritime travelers has been divided to accord with the desires of a power half a world away, and whose maritime exploration becomes prevalent over a thousand years later.

In defense of the International Date Line, however, I can relate to how, in today's globalized world, the choosing of the Pacific is perhaps the 'lesser of the evils'. The only other place where relatively few land features exist in a north-south line would be the middle of the Atlantic.

   On the bright side, however, I applaud the decision to not make the I.D.L. and longitude 180` one in the same. At least by making small variations, a somewhat-existent sense of regional-relations geography can still exist more clearly.

   P.S. The Samoans weren't the only people to lose their birthdays. My grandfather has make frequent mentions of how he is one year younger than we think he is, since he crossed the I.D.L. on his way to an American military base in Japan.

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North Korea threatens to strike without warning

North Korea threatens to strike without warning | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
North Korea turned up the temperature yet another degree on its neighbors Monday, warning that it would not give any advance notice before attacking South Korea.

Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

Kim Jung-Un's reckless actions and threats that were the highlights of the beginning of his regime was nothing more than a frivoulous attempt at displaying his power.  He wanted the world to see his legitimacy as a leader, whether or not it was known he is the leader of a cult of personality. He wanted us to take him seriously, and in a way we did, as these threats were the talk among the nation for a bit.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 16, 2013 12:49 PM

This CNN video briefly highlights why many pundits think "this time is different" --the rhetoric and threatens have gone far beyond what North Korea has done in the past.  You might also enjoy the Plaid Avenger's always irreverant analysis in this 'plaidcast.' 


TagsNorth Korea, war, conflict.

Bryan knesel's curator insight, April 16, 2013 7:44 PM

great article in my openion i think the we should just bomb them and end all of this. and i found it wired that they are breaking the armisist from south korea .

Dakota Swank's comment, April 18, 2013 11:03 AM
yea knesel. Weird huh? Well the armisist treaty involves the US so, lets be honest, nothing is going to happen there because all this is is little Kim Jong Un in his big boy britches, they're just empty threats. So why waste the nuke? it will just be devistating and tragic for the whole world, you can't just wipe out an entire population like that. It's not human.
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McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the forces that lead towards an accelaration of human connectivity around the globe?  What are the postive impacts of this increased connectivity?  What are some negative impacts?  Are these impacts the same in all places?  Explain. 

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

This is only one change McDonalds has had to make in order to have a sustainable market in India.  They obviously have not sold beef or pork pattied burgers at a high rate.  If they want to keep business booming in India than they need to keep showing the Indian people that they can innovate and provide the best service they can while also respecting the customs of their society.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 29, 6:20 PM

I am impressed that McDonald's knows their clientele so well! This is a company that will last since it is very globally conscious and therefore can open a restaurant in any country.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 5:07 PM

McDonald's adjustment to producing a mostly vegetarian menu for locations in India is a smart business move on their part, and once again displays the positive affects of globalization on a company, but may hurt any of the smaller businesses in the area.

 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 8:03 PM

This article was really interesting to read especially because I have been working at a McDonalds for almost three years now. McDonalds is huge franchise that is known all over the world. Of course my McDonald's does not serve anything for vegetarians. India has various reasons for going meatless. One is that cows are sacred to Hindus. Also, Muslims who live in the country do not eat pork. As opposed to my location who has a top seller of a Big Mac, India's top seller is a McAloo Tikki burger. This burger is made out of a potato based patty as opposed to ground beef. The company is also planning to open another vegetarian location.

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The Central African Republic on the brink of a Humanitarian catastrophe

The Central African Republic on the brink of a Humanitarian catastrophe

Via Ramy Jabbar رامي
Ryan Amado's insight:

This is a crisis that needs more attention paid to it.  The CAR has been a highly unstable country for the marjority of the past two years and is now on the brink of genocide.  Many of it's citizens have been displaced, and human rights violations increase as the days go by. This conflict needs a resolution before it goes too far.

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South Sudan’s President relieves VP and dissolves government

South Sudan’s President relieves VP and dissolves government | RIC Geography | Scoop.it

July 23, 2013 (JUBA) – South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir Mayardit, has issued a presidential decree removing the vice-president, Riek Machar Teny, and dissolved the whole government.


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

Unfortunately, these actions seem to be the one of a man who is trying desperately to hold on to his power. It is known that there was a power struggle between him and members of his government. It is the last thing this young country needs when it is trying to establish itself.  Hopefully this move does not lead to the very thing South Sudanians were trying to get away from.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 24, 2013 4:46 PM

Here is a living example of how hard it is to start a new country.  Imagine what our founding fathers int he US was doing back in 1783 when they were trying something new, with not much to look to in the past as an example.  Even with all the history since then, and all the examples of how to for a working governemt, startnig a new country in the area of the world that was once controlled by imperialists and warlords is not going to be an easy task by no stretch of the imagination.  We can only hope for the best for these people.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 24, 9:59 PM

It is very difficult for a country this young to be politically and economically stable. The president must have a difficult time earning the peoples respect when the country is struggling.  Removing the vice president only upset some locals as they felt he showed signs of a dictator.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:56 PM

He wants to get rid of the entire political cabinet. Who does he think he is, Superman? There is no way this president can take on a whole nation by himself. He needs to reconsider his actions and think about South Sudan and its needs.

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Ten Years After the Invasion of Iraq: The Human Cost


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

The death of 190,000 people due to war is always a tragedy.  There is a positive side to this number, however.  The Iraq war cost 190,00 lives in ten years, an average of 19,000 deaths a year. In World War II, the Russians alone lost 9,000,000 people, in a much shorter amount of time.  We are no longer losing large chunks of our population in wars, due to new technology and combat strategies. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 15, 2013 1:03 PM

The effects of war can be staggering and far-reaching.  Often the costs are much higher than anticipated at the beginning.  Read this press release for more details on the recent findings regarding the actual costs of the Iraq War, which are estimated to have cost over 190,000 lives and $2.2 trillion. 


Tags: Iraq, conflict, K12, political, MiddleEast, war.

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NYTimes video: "Skateistan"

NYTimes video: "Skateistan" | RIC Geography | Scoop.it

"Afghan youth have very limited options for sports and recreation. An Australian man is trying to change that."  Issues of ethnicity, class and gender are right on the surface.  Globalization, cultural values and shifting norms make this a good discussion piece.  


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

In an unstable region such as this one, it is very encouraging to see the young people of Afghanistan particpating in an actvity thats radical in it's own way.  Not only does skateboarding add to the short list of recreational activities for these kids, but one with just the right amount of skill could possibly do something substantial with their skills.  It creates an opportunity for them in a way. Hopefully the "Skateistan" movement continues to spread across the country.

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Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 22, 1:25 PM

This is an inspirational video it is very powerful to see someone trying to make life better. The young Australian man that has created this program should be applauded. Watching this video you can tell that this simple gesture brings so much joy to these children. One feeling that comes to mind is yes countries can seem different but they can also seem familiar. These children are just like any others they want to play and have fun. I think this is a wonderful program for them to help them forget about the dangerous world they live in.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 3, 2:03 PM

This is a good example of the use of soft power in areas where American culture is not popular. Instead of using military force to exert western Ideals on the people of Afghanistan. This Australian may have found a way to close the gap towards bringing our cultures  closer together.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 14, 8:01 PM

In a society that is seen by most of the world as strict and rigid, it was interesting to see these children having fun and breaking the mold of traditional afghan kids. What makes this even more fascinating is that female children are doing some of the skating. With gender issues a hot topic in some Middle Eastern countries, letting kids have fun before being made to conform to tradition is a nice experience for them. While they still respect the culture to they belong to, it is a break from that and a breathe of fresh air for them. These youth are not seen primarily as men and woman, but as children.

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In Russia, a lack of men forces women to settle for less

In Russia, a lack of men forces women to settle for less | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
When Russia and China vote together on UN Resolutions (such as their recent veto of the UN Resolution on Syria), I always think to myself that in the two countries’ collective unconscious they realize that they are going to have...

 

Demographic facts: 1) China has more men than women. 2) Russian has more women than men. While these two facts are rather straightforward, their impact on society, gender roles, politics, economics and culture are quite complicated. This article chronicles how this 'shortage' of men in Russia has led to an imbalance of power in heterosexual relationships, altering cultural gender norms.


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

This could be a reason that Russia has been pushing an anti-Homosexual agenda.  It certainly is not right, and has been enforced too extremely, but perhaps they feel that there are not enough heterosexual relationships  due to the uneven ratio of men and women, and that an increase in the amount of homosexual couples will add to the issue.  

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, October 18, 10:02 PM

When hearing of Russia's imbalance of men vs. women I did not think further into how much this fact could affect not only hetero relationships, but the relationships amongst the sexes themselves as well.  Morality is altered in this society where men are so scarce and are "shared" by the women.  It is known that Putin, a married man is married and has had a long term affair, and child with another  women.  The article states "no one really cares."  With our fair share of presidential affairs both in the far past and fairly recent, we see how unacceptable society finds such behavior.  But would the game change if all of sudden men were so scarce?  It is also disheartening that the female population is not united due to the lack of men.  

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 17, 11:21 AM

Talk about two different worlds! This kind or reminds me of the times when other countries would marry off their sons or daughters for a show of good faith and a means of connecting the two countries together. Except this wouldn't be for power it would be for survival. Would the "stronger" Russian woman be able to adapt to a Chinese way of living? They have the "obedienence" behind their husbands already, but the language and culture change might be a harsh reality for both the men of China and the women and Russia. Maybe Russia should adapt a Polyamorous way of life rather than these two countries coming together?

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 12:14 PM

This is a great example of population geography shifting cultural geography. The altering of gender norms in Russia due to the shortage of men shows how all types of geography are intertwined and cultural and population are related deeply. This is a contemporary example of that.

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Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map

Stalin’s Ethnic Deportations—and the Gerrymandered Ethnic Map | RIC Geography | Scoop.it

"An earlier GeoCurrents post on Chechnya mentioned that the Chechens were deported from their homeland in the North Caucasus to Central Asia in February 1944.  However, the Chechen nation was not the only one to suffer such a fate under Stalin’s regime."


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

Stalin probably did not have the outlook of his country's geography in mind when he deported all of these people.  It goes to show that ruthless dictatorships are never the way to go, as impulsive decisions and tyranny can have consequences for the long term.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 1:09 AM

This article details the ethnic deportation of peoples during the Soviet era. Many peoples were relocated under the guise of creating an ethnically unified Soviet Union but the truth was while some of the deportations were to simply move workers places of planned industry, many were to exile those deemed enemies of the state. The article estimates over 40% of those relocated died of diseases, malnutrition, or mistreatment. These forced migrations changed the demographics of Eastern Europe and Asia while causing major conflicts between various ethnic groups and Russia.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 9:22 AM

This article describes the practice of Lenin and Stalin of Russifacation.  This policy led to many ethnic minorities with in the Soviet Union being deported from their home soil to the interior of Russia.  The aim was to place ethnic Russian in boarder areas and to bring the ‘undesirable’ ethnicity into the interior to become Russian or sent to the gulags to die.  The effects of this mass relocation of ethnicity is still being felt today.  The rising conflict in Ukraine is a direct result from these policies as the country is split between ethnic Ukraine and the decedents of the ethnic Russians move there to secure the ports to the Black Sea.

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 12, 1:43 PM

The Soviet Union forced vast amounts of people and ethnic groups out of their historical homelands to settle new areas during the early and mid 20th century. Many of those forced into resettlement died, and today some consider it a genocide or crime against humanity. As ethnic groups were moved out, ethnic Russians were moved in to take their places, and explains why many places outside of Russia (Ukraine) have populations that still maintain strong Russian identities. It also explains why places like Chechnya have such a long history of insurgency and extremism against Russian authority and power.

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An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London

An Interactive Map of the Blitz: Where and When the Bombs Fell on London | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
The extent of the campaign is shocking.

Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

It was called the Blitz for a reason. For months, nobody in London was safe.  As seen on the map, nearly every inch of London was affected by Nazi bombs. Not only were there bombs falling, but also planes and other war machines involved.  The modern version of London is surely a rebuilt version of its 1940's counterpart.

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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:46 PM

This is one of my favorite maps that I have seen. How devastating it must have been to live in London at the time, never knowing where the next one would land to destroy the city.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 7:50 AM

This map shows the locations for the nearly 2000 bombs which were dropped on London during the Blitz in WWII. The bombs were dropped entirely inside the ring of M25 London Orbital Motorway which encircles London. The bombs are most concentrated in the center of the ring, likely to do the most damage, to either infrastructure or the people.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 8:30 PM

This map shows just how devastating the bombs were on London. At first glance, this does not look like a map of the bombs dropped. It would not be until it was labeled as such would it show the results of the war on London. Very few areas were unaffected and the majority of London was hit.

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Song: European Union

Song: European Union | RIC Geography | Scoop.it

"Germany and France spent decades at each others' throats. Now, bound by a common currency, they're working together to save the euro zone. It's a story that's begging for a musical number — which, as it happens, we have right here."


Via Seth Dixon
Ryan Amado's insight:

This song does every bit of telling the truth while still being humorous in nature.  It is only fitting that there is some comedy here, because there is some irony in what the EU was supposed to become and what it has turned into since it's installment. 

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 10, 5:59 PM

This song is very much funny to hear and it describes the E.U financial problems that they are facing. Althought most seem to be dramatic over what is really going on with the European Union. But a funny way to get the broad realization of what is going on!

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 11:21 AM

Yet, they are both singing in the English man language, like wanted to be heard by glorious England. The European Union is strong, but at the same time fragile. It feel it can break by any politic different.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 6:03 PM

Looking at European history as a whole this recent unity between nations, especially Germany and France is an incredibly new and unusual concept. For centuries European countries have been at one another's throats only in the late 20th century has this changed. While this idea of a musical is humors it shows that because of globalization and economics these nations have bounded together and now are heavily reliant upon one another.   

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Were People Killing Giant Sloths in South America 30,000 Years Ago?

Were People Killing Giant Sloths in South America 30,000 Years Ago? | RIC Geography | Scoop.it
Bones with possible human tool marks could point to an earlier human arrival in the Americas, a new study says.
    

Via Thomas Faltin
Ryan Amado's insight:

This certainly raises some new questions about exactly how long humanity has existed. This is not the only place where hunting materials this old are being discovered, however.  Here, were dealing with 30,000 year old objects.  Elsewhere, they are finding ancient spears that may be 280,000 years old.  Discoveries like these are vital, as they are helping us answer the fundamental questions about humanity we have been trying to answer for thousands of years.  

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