Revitalize Your Mind & Life
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Revitalize Your Mind & Life
Self-improvement  and Relationship Advice based on neuroscience and research
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Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
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How Many Friends Can Your Brain Handle?

How Many Friends Can Your Brain Handle? | Revitalize Your Mind & Life | Scoop.it
A new study shows that having lots of friends is linked with greater connectivity between certain brain areas.

 

Being a social butterfly just might change your brain: In people with a large network of friends and excellent social skills, certain brain regions are bigger and better connected than in people with fewer friends, a new study finds.

 

Scientists still don't understand how the brain manages human behavior in increasingly complex social situations, or what parts of the brain are linked to deviant social behavior associated with conditions like autism and schizophrenia.

 

In the study, some brain areas were enlarged and better connected in people with larger social networks. In humans, these areas were the temporal parietal junction, the anterior cingulate cortex and the rostral prefrontal cortex, which are part of a network involved in "mentalization" — the ability to attribute mental states, thoughts and beliefs to another.


Via Pamir Kiciman
Melanie Greenberg's insight:

Secure attachment experoences lead to connected brains and perhaps larger social networks.

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Annie 's curator insight, November 20, 2013 2:58 PM

Friends and collegues alike, it helps to get you and your brand out and about. Networking can only strengthen your company exposure and also allow to build friendships along the way. So go out and mix and mingle this holiday season. Cheers!

Rescooped by Melanie Greenberg from Meditation Compassion Mindfulness
Scoop.it!

Life's Messy; Train Your Brain to Adapt

Life's Messy; Train Your Brain to Adapt | Revitalize Your Mind & Life | Scoop.it
Margaret Moore, co-founder and co-director of the Institute of Coaching at McLean Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, answers all our burning questions about how to sift through the chaos of the digital age and organize our lives and minds.

 

Organization, she says, is not just about a cluttered desk. It’s about self-regulation, a skill that is developed by the pre-frontal cortex--the seat of executive function in the brain. The left pre-frontal cortex regulates your attention: it evaluates, judges, makes decisions. Modern life, with its barrage of incoming emails and phone calls and texts, taxes the pre-frontal cortex, inhibiting the brain’s ability to focus. Those who have naturally strong self-regulation can handle the overload—and those who don’t are left feeling guilty and out of control.

But the plasticity of the brain means we can all learn to be better focused and more organized.


Via Pamir Kiciman
Melanie Greenberg's insight:

We need to learn and practice self-control and Mindfulness to overcome the barrage of distractions.

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