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Rescooped by Lola Ripollés from sustainable architecture
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Australia's Angophora House by Richard Cole Architecture

Australia's Angophora House by Richard Cole Architecture | retail and design | Scoop.it

Angophora House was designed by Richard Cole Architecture, and it is located in Waverton, a suburb on the lower North Shore of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

“Built over an escarpment in a densely urbanised heritage conservation area in Waverton, the form of this house responds to the difficult site using the elements of cave, platform and canopy. On entering the house from the upper road, one passes through a curvaceous enclosing concrete wall with rooftop garden over.

Two platforms launch into the space of the valley, extending out from the anchoring escarpment. Insulated timber moveable walls transform the space from warm and enclosing to open and unimpeded. A sheltering timber lined roof opens to the north, falls in response to the slope of the land and captures framed views of adjacent Angophora trees.

The escarpment is retained, raw and open to the rooms of the lower ground floor. A dramatic lift takes the owners to the garage on the street below.”


Via Lauren Moss
Lola Ripollés's insight:

Preciosa casa en Sydney, con un uso magistral de la madera y el hormigón y una increíble fluidez entre el exterior y el interior.

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Quince's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:11 PM

"Utilizing the elements of Cave , Platform, and Canopy"  I haven't heard that one before, but I like it! Very nice open design

Rescooped by Lola Ripollés from sustainable architecture
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Tyrolean Festival Hall Reflects the Dramatic Landscape of the Austrian Alps

Tyrolean Festival Hall Reflects the Dramatic Landscape of the Austrian Alps | retail and design | Scoop.it

A concert hall carves its own niche in the Austrian Alps while bowing to the neighboring midcentury playhouse and the breathtaking landscape.

In the picturesque Austrian village of Erl, where the rugged Alps descend to meet the undulating valley below, a striking, angular structure, the Tyrolean Festspielhaus, or Festival Hall, pierces the landscape that inspired it. “We conceived of the building as tectonic plates shifting over one another,” says Sebastian Brunke, a project architect from the Viennese firm Delugan Meissl Associated Architects. “The opening between the two plates forms the foyer, which glows at night and through which the Alpine landscape flows like a carpet.” Reflecting the mountains above, the upper volume's sharply pointed cantilever juts out almost 100 feet.


Via Lauren Moss
Lola Ripollés's insight:

Me gustaría asistir a algún concierto allí.

Como gesto arquitectónico, me parece de una fuerza increíble. Además encaja perfectamente posándose en el paisaje e integrándose en él. Arquitectura o escultura?

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