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JVA's Rabot Tourist Cabin: A Neutral Volume in the Landscape

JVA's Rabot Tourist Cabin: A Neutral Volume in the Landscape | retail and design | Scoop.it

The Rabot Tourist Cabin is one of many DNT (Norwegian Trekking Association) lodging facilities throughout Norway. At 1200 meters above sea level, close to the glacier at Okstindan in northern Norway, the site is spectacular. The weather can be extremely harsh and the structure is constructed for heavy winds and storm.

A secondary rescue hut is placed 50 meters away from the main cabin as a safe shelter in case of destruction of the main cabin. The site inaccessible by road and is only reachable on foot or on skis. The cabin is named after the French glaciologist and geographer Charles Rabot who thoroughly explored the mountain areas in the province of Nordland. It is planned and built with local materials and with great local commitment...


Via Lauren Moss
Lola Ripollés's insight:

Cabina turística en Noruega. Con una unidad de rescate/refugio a 50 metros de la principal y con acceso sólo a pie. 

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Rescooped by Lola Ripollés from sustainable architecture
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Australia's Angophora House by Richard Cole Architecture

Australia's Angophora House by Richard Cole Architecture | retail and design | Scoop.it

Angophora House was designed by Richard Cole Architecture, and it is located in Waverton, a suburb on the lower North Shore of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

“Built over an escarpment in a densely urbanised heritage conservation area in Waverton, the form of this house responds to the difficult site using the elements of cave, platform and canopy. On entering the house from the upper road, one passes through a curvaceous enclosing concrete wall with rooftop garden over.

Two platforms launch into the space of the valley, extending out from the anchoring escarpment. Insulated timber moveable walls transform the space from warm and enclosing to open and unimpeded. A sheltering timber lined roof opens to the north, falls in response to the slope of the land and captures framed views of adjacent Angophora trees.

The escarpment is retained, raw and open to the rooms of the lower ground floor. A dramatic lift takes the owners to the garage on the street below.”


Via Lauren Moss
Lola Ripollés's insight:

Preciosa casa en Sydney, con un uso magistral de la madera y el hormigón y una increíble fluidez entre el exterior y el interior.

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Quince's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:11 PM

"Utilizing the elements of Cave , Platform, and Canopy"  I haven't heard that one before, but I like it! Very nice open design

Rescooped by Lola Ripollés from sustainable architecture
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The Tsunami House by Designs Northwest Architects

The Tsunami House by Designs Northwest Architects | retail and design | Scoop.it

Designs Northwest Architects have recently completed the Tsunami House, located on Camano Island in Washington State, a waterfront home located on a 3,140 square foot site in a high velocity flood zone.

The 887 square foot main living level is be located 5′ above grade and the foundations are designed on pilings to withstand high velocity tsunami wave action. The lower 748 square foot space is designed with walls able to break away in the event of a storm surge.

The exterior materials of the house are durable and low maintenance; architectural concrete columns are left exposed and the exterior siding is a mixture of composite and galvanized standing seam panels and aluminum windows. The lower level floor is polished concrete with radiant in floor heat and the ceilings are covered with western red cedar to add warmth to the otherwise industrial feeling of the lower level...

 



Via Lauren Moss
Lola Ripollés's insight:

Tsunami House, located on Camano Island in Washington State, a waterfront home located on a 3,140 square foot site in a high velocity flood zone.

The 887 square foot main living level is be located 5′ above grade and the foundations are designed on pilings to withstand high velocity tsunami wave action. The lower 748 square foot space is designed with walls able to break away in the event of a storm surge.

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16s3d's curator insight, January 4, 2014 6:30 AM

Je reste dubitatif face à la prétention humaine de maîtriser la forece des événements naturels...

Betty Fitzgerald's curator insight, January 9, 2014 6:06 PM

I'm helping friends on a beach cottage remodel. I counted, it's 132 steps from the beach. I dearly love Oregon's beach cottages. And I equally fear the Cascadia Subduction Zone! This looks awesome and er, expensive. :/