Resources for Social & Emotional Learning
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Resources for Social & Emotional Learning
This collection includes updates, research, and resources to create healthy learning environments and to support Social and Emotional core competencies. For a related page on Safe Schools & Communities, visit http://bit.ly/safe_schools_resources.
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Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning // casel.org

Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning // casel.org | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

"Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL) is the nation’s leading organization advancing the development of academic, social and emotional competence for all students. Our mission is to help make evidence-based social and emotional learning an integral part of education from preschool through high school. Through research, practice and policy, CASEL collaborates to ensure all students become knowledgeable, responsible, caring and contributing members of society."

 

http://www.casel.org

 

For the SEL Wheel of the 5 Core Competencies, please visit: http://www.casel.org/social-and-emotional-learning/core-competencies/

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These are goals parents, communities and educators at all levels should strive to acheive. 

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Resources for Nurturing Resilience // Edutopia

Resources for Nurturing Resilience // Edutopia | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

"The ability to bounce back from adversity is associated with a variety of skills. Learn more about the resilience research and supports and strategies to address resilience in young people." 


http://www.edutopia.org/article/resilience-resources 

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Safe Schools & Communities Resources

Safe Schools & Communities Resources | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

http://www.scoop.it/t/safe-schools-communities

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Several Ways To Apply Social-Emotional Learning Strategies In The Classroom

Several Ways To Apply Social-Emotional Learning Strategies In The Classroom | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

(Teacher) Glenda Robertson asked: "What are some highly-effective must-do social-emotional learning strategies that we can immediately incorporate into our classroom culture?"

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What is Meditation / Mindfulness Good for? // Information is Beautiful

What is Meditation / Mindfulness Good for? // Information is Beautiful | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

http://www.informationisbeautiful.net/visualizations/what-is-meditation-mindfulness-good-for/ 

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Meditation Curbs Violence at San Francisco Schools // NBC News

Meditation Curbs Violence at San Francisco Schools // NBC News | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

http://www.nbcnews.com/watch/nightly-news/meditation-curbs-violence-at-san-francisco-schools-378464323951 

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Mindful Schools: Online Mindfulness Training for Educators // MindfulSchools.org

Mindful Schools: Online Mindfulness Training for Educators // MindfulSchools.org | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

"Mindful Schools was founded in 2007 as a program of a single school in Oakland CA. Today, it is a not-for-profit training organization with online and in-person courses, content, and a network of mindful educators spanning all 50 U.S. states and 100+ countries."...


For more, visit: http://www.mindfulschools.org/ 

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Teaching Peace in Elementary School // NY Times

Teaching Peace in Elementary School // NY Times | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

[Image credit: Sophie Lécuyer] 

By Julie Scelfo

For years, there has been a steady stream of headlines about the soaring mental health needs of college students and their struggles with anxiety and lack of resilience.  
Now, a growing number of educators are trying to bolster emotional competency not on college campuses, but where they believe it will have the greatest impact: in elementary schools.


In many communities, elementary teachers, guidance counselors and administrators are embracing what is known as social and emotional learning, or S.E.L., a process through which people become more aware of their feelings and learn to relate more peacefully to others.


Feeling left out? Angry at your mom? Embarrassed to speak out loud during class? Proponents of S.E.L. say these feelings aren’t insignificant issues to be ignored in favor of the three R’s. Unless emotions are properly dealt with, they believe, children won’t be able to reach their full academic potential.


“It’s not just about how you feel, but how are you going to solve a problem, whether it’s an academic problem or a peer problem or a relationship problem with a parent,” said Mark T. Greenberg, a professor of human development and psychology at Pennsylvania State University.


Echoing the concept of “emotional intelligence,” popularized in the 1990s by Daniel Goleman’s best-selling book of the same name, he added, “The ability to get along with others is really the glue of healthy human development.”


Today’s schoolchildren confront not only the inherent difficulty of growing up, but also an increasingly fraught testing environment, a lower tolerance for physical acting out and the pervasive threat of violence. (President Obama last year characterized school shootings as “becoming the norm.”) Poverty and income inequality, too, create onerous emotional conditions for many children.
 

“The neural pathways in the brain that deal with stress are the same ones that are used for learning,” said Marc Brackett, director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, a research and teaching center. “Schools are realizing that they have to help kids understand their feelings and manage them effectively.” He added, “We, as a country, want our kids to achieve more academically, but we can’t do this if our kids aren’t emotionally healthy.”...


For full post, click on title above or here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/15/sunday-review/teaching-peace-in-elementary-school.html 

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Socio-Emotional and Psychological Issues and Needs of Gifted African-American Students: Culture Matters

To download, click on title above or here; 

http://forestoftheraineducation.weebly.com/uploads/3/5/8/2/3582998/socio-emotional-and-psychological-issues-and-needs-of-gifted-african-american-students-culture-matters.pdf 

Please also see main website at: 

http://forestoftheraineducation.weebly.com/8203-socio-emotional--psychological-issues-and-needs-of-gifted-african-american-students-culture-matters8203.html 

 

Dr. Michelle Frazier Trotman Scott 
Title: Associate Professor of Special Education

Research Interest: Achievement Gap, Special Education Over-Representation, Gifted Education, Under-Representation, Twice Exceptional, Creating Culturally Responsive Classrooms, and Increasing Family Involvement. 
BIO: Dr. Michelle Frazier Trotman Scott is an Assistant Professor of Special Education in the College of Education. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in special education and undergraduate courses in diversity. Her research foci are over-representation minorities in special education, under-representation of minorities in gifted education, the achievement gap, and parenting and she has published in all areas. Prior to her appointment at UWG, Dr. Trotman Scott was a middle school teacher, a middle and high school coach, a principal of a large elementary school and a superintendent of a charter school in Ohio, and then an adjunct professor at The Ohio State University.

 

http://forestoftheraineducation.weebly.com/8203-socio-emotional--psychological-issues-and-needs-of-gifted-african-american-students-culture-matters8203.html 

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As Graduation Rates Rise, a Call to Focus on Nurturing Students // Living in Dialogue

As Graduation Rates Rise, a Call to Focus on Nurturing Students // Living in Dialogue | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

By John Thompson
"The good news is that graduation rates are improving across the nation (see this announcement from a few days ago.) The best news is that social science points the way to even greater progress. Ironically, corporate school reformers, who have focused obsessively on improving student “achievement” as measured by test scores, are now shifting attention to graduation rates and away from their failure to improve teaching and learning. Although this pivot is public relations-driven, designed to distract from the lack of gains produced by their competition-driven mandates, educators should welcome it and offer to work collaboratively with anyone who will help improve children’s life prospects.


We must also remind the non-education press that the fundamental reason for test-driven reform, supposedly, was that accountability hawks demanded “output-driven” mandates to replace “input-driven” school improvement. The effort to raise graduation rates is a classic input-driven reform, and it still works.  As Jack Jennings reminds us, the old-fashioned input-driven policies that preceded standards and testing were not perfect. The old progressive efforts to build student supports became underfunded, but they produced positive results that are greater than the expensive accountability-driven pedagogies that were supposedly more tough-minded. Now, as University of Chicago researchers are once again showing, those classic methods of investing in mentors and counselors still work, and the path to school improvement requires trusting, loving relationship-building, not winners and losers.


To further prepare students for a meaningful and healthy life, we must heed the findings of Don’t Quit on Me, by The Center for Promise at America’s Promise Alliance.  It begins with the seemingly unchallengeable scientific evidence that, “Social relationships are a fundamental need for all humans, built into our biological, neurological and psychological architecture.”  The study explains why schools must ramp up the battle against the legacies of “adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), toxic stress, structural barriers such as poverty and institutionalized bias.”


The next era of school improvement must heed a first rule of classroom teachers, listen to the kids and they will teach us how to teach them. The Center for Promise’s Don’t Quit on Me features interviews with students who tell the same stories that I heard throughout my career in the inner city. It is consistent with the way my students would be on track in their early years until they lost the parent who raised them or attended too many family funerals. During their mourning, children would fall off the academic conveyor belt. There was no institutionalized method for helping them get back on track."...


For full post, click on title above or here:

http://www.livingindialogue.com/as-graduation-rates-rise-a-call-to-focus-on-nurturing-students/ 

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CCARE Science of Compassion 2014: Introduction to the Science of Empathy, Altruism, and Compassion

Introduction to the Science of Empathy, Altruism, and Compassion


Moderator: Paul Ekman, PhD
Paul Gilbert, BA, MSc, PhD, FBPsS, OBE, Components of Compassion
Felix Warneken, PhD, The Developmental Origins of Human Altruism 
Daniel Batson, PhD, The Empathy-Altruism Hypothesis: What and So What?
Daryl Cameron, PhD, Motivation, Capacity, and the Limits of Compassion 


The Science of Compassion conference is a two-day event held by Stanford's Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education to share and explore the latest research and application of compassion from experts in the field of psychology, neuroscience and compassion education.


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Hip Hop, Grit, & Academic Success: Dr. Bettina Love at TEDxUGA

"This impassioned talk explains how students who identify with Hip Hop culture have been ignored or deemed deficient in schools because of mainstream misconceptions associated with Hip Hop culture. Through Hip Hop, these students embody the characteristics of grit, social and emotional intelligence, and the act improvisation- all of which are proven to be predictors for academic success. So where is the break down between formalized education and the potential for success for these students? Dr. Love argues that ignoring students' culture in the classroom is all but an oversight; it's discrimination and injustice that plays out in our culture in very dangerous ways."...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=226&v=tkZqPMzgvzg  

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EMF, Wireless Radiation, & Screen Time Research // http://bit.ly/wifi_research

EMF, Wireless Radiation, & Screen Time Research // http://bit.ly/wifi_research | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

"This collection includes research, updates, and resources related to EMF/RF Radiation and screen time.  For two excellent websites with extensive documents for safe technology advocacy, please visit the National Association for Children and Safe Technology at http://nacst.org and Parents for Safe Technology at http://www.parentsforsafetechnology.org/school.html. For additional resources and updates in Education, please visit http://eduresearcher.com."  

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This Is My Place: Middle Schoolers on Social and Emotional Learning // What Kids Can Do WKCD

What most helps young people thrive in a challenging academic environment? Answers from students bear out what research has found: social and emotional factors constitute a crucial underpinning for learning.
 

In recent WKCD interviews at School of the Future in New York City, middle schoolers gave their own examples of how everyday interactions between students, peers, and adults affected how they learned in the classroom.

Their descriptions reflected some key unspoken questions that adolescents bring with them into a school environment:

  • Will I able to do the work here? Will I be smart enough?
  • Will I be safe here? Will I be teased or made to feel bad somehow?
  • Will I get to help decide what happens to me here?

 

NOTE: For years WKCD has gathered, most of all, the voices and vision of high-school-age youth—although we did publish the popular Fires in the Middle School Bathroom: Advice for Teachers from Middle Schoolerby Kathleen Cushman and Laura Rogers (The New Press, 2008). In the months ahead, we aim to include more voices and perspectives from the middle grades.


For main page, please click on title above or here: http://www.whatkidscando.org/featurestories/2012/12_this_is_my_place/ 

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LISTEN Preview Screenings Response // Director & Producer Erahm Christopher

"This video is a compilation of audience response from the August 2015 preview screenings of "Listen", written and directed by Erahm Christopher. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F1f8u83Evo&feature=youtu.be 

 

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For the official trailer, please see: https://youtu.be/rD18ZHBGW04 

"Everyday someone is waiting for another person to notice they are broken or alone. How many times do we really pay attention? This film is about the moments in life that we miss when we do not listen.

Follow on Instagram and Twitter: @listenthemovie 
Subscribe on the website: www.listenthemovie.com 

Written, Directed and Produced by Erahm Christopher
Produced by Brooke Dooley

Inspired by real stories
Filmed in Manteca & Linden CA"

 

 

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The Power of Belief -- Mindset and Success // Eduardo Briceno // TEDxManhattanBeach

"The way we understand our intelligence and abilities deeply impacts our success. Based on social science research and real life examples, Eduardo Briceño articulates how mindset, or the understanding of intelligence and abilities, is key. When students or adults see their abilities as fixed, whether they think they're naturals or just not built for a certain domain, they avoid challenge and lose interest when things get hard. Conversely, when they understand that abilities are developed, they more readily adopt learning-oriented behaviors such as deliberate practice and grit that enable them to achieve their goals. But this belief is itself malleable, and there are clear actions we can all take to establish a growth mindset and enable success for our children, our peers and ourselves.

Eduardo Briceño is the Co-Founder and CEO of Mindset Works (http://www.mindsetworks.com), an organization that helps schools and other organizations cultivate a growth mindset culture. The growth mindset was discovered by Stanford professor and Mindset Works co-founder Carol Dweck, Ph.D., and is described in her book Mindset: The New Psychology of Success (http://www.mindsetonline.com). Mindset Works offers Brainology, an innovative blended learning program to teach a growth mindset to students, teachers and schools, as well as teacher professional development and tools (http://www.mindsetworks.com/brainology/)."

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pN34FNbOKXc 

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What Defines a Good School? // EdWeek Commentary 

What Defines a Good School? // EdWeek Commentary  | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

By David Gamberg  [Photo credit: Marty Barrick for Education Week]

"Words matter. They matter in all aspects of life, especially when we are talking about how to define a school. Of course, brick and mortar are only a small part of the story. The academic and emotional climate, both inside and outside the physical space, gets us closer to an understanding of what forms the basis of any school. Throughout our country, we have many opinions, positions, and reform efforts competing to control the narrative not only of what defines a school, but also, more significantly, of what it means to be educated in 2016 and beyond.

 

My daily travels in the schoolhouse as a superintendent give me an inside look at what constitutes a school. I am fortunate that my professional work over the last 30 years has put me inside dozens of schools and in contact with hundreds of educators, scholars, and support staff. I have also had the good fortune to be in the company of thousands of children and their families. No, I do not consider myself an expert on all things that define a school. I do, however, have a vested interest in seeing that the schools of today and those that are created in the future are shaped with the care and respect they so richly deserve.

 

The call to have children as young as 8 or 9 years old "college- and career-ready" does not create the same narrative as building a sound foundation in childhood filled with play and creativity. Among the many other more important ways to engage the hearts and minds of our youngest students, we must promote the childhood experience in all its wonder.

Schools have always existed as an expression of how a given community values its children, and how a society looks at the future—a covenant handed down from one generation to the next. The problems that beset our social, political, and economic well-being as a nation are, in fact, not born at the doorsteps of our schools. They are certainly not derived exclusively from the province of our public schools. The crumbling roads, bridges, and tunnels of the infrastructure that is the lifeblood of a thriving economy demand our attention, as does the scourge of substance abuse wreaking havoc on families of every demographic group.

Local neighborhood and even family issues that confront all generations, from toddlers to senior citizens, are ever-present in our daily lives. If schools do play a part in shaping our future—and I believe they do—how we articulate the issues matters as much as how we marshal the will and resources to meet these challenges.

 

The calls to shutter schools, to replace and dismantle them, are being offered by those with a variety of other interests. These are not the solutions we should accept. They create a hostile dialogue that reflects the worst in our democratic discourse. In the last 10 years, we have witnessed a rapid decline in civility, an unfettered belligerent approach to the questions central to the teaching and learning process. 

 

Words matter in how we discuss our schools and the issues that confront all communities. How this conversation occurs has changed in recent decades across the entire country, from small rural towns to large suburban and urban communities. Technology affords us wonderful ways to gather data points that could promote change, but it may still fail to foster a deliberative and thoughtful dialogue regarding the seeds of our problems. The most basic elements of our humanity must not get lost in the pursuit of a faster, data-driven decisionmaking process. Such is a key element of our current fascination with a punitive, high-stakes testing environment designed to sort and select students and teachers.

So, what truly defines a school? For me, the exchange between child and adult is at the heart of it. That exchange may be subtle or vigorous—not rigorous. Rigor, which shares roots with the Latin rigor mortis, implies severity, rigidity, and stiffness—all connotations that restrict the learner and the learning process—while vigor implies energy and dynamism.

 

Yes, words matter. The best learning occurs when both teacher and student are in pursuit of a deeper understanding. It is a quest that is based on love, one that is filled with authentic, joyful, challenging, and impactful experiences. A school is a place of respect and wonder.

The search to create, discover, reveal, and share is an unending journey that occurs in the best of our schools: the child immersed in beautiful poetry, the student acquiring the skill of using a watercolor-paint brush, the rendering of a museum-quality display of artifacts. Scientific experiments, research papers, debates, and discussions centered on classic literature are the means through which students explore and discover ideas. Unpacking the essential elements of contemporary issues and having students learn to take responsibility for their actions coalesce to teach valuable lessons that extend beyond the school walls. Students who present their learning before a panel of adjudicators and get so immersed that they lose track of time are then at their optimal disposition to learn. No reward or punishment necessary.

 

All members of a community, from custodians to teachers and principals to kindergartners, are the learners of a true school. A climate of fear and hostility, or a tone of acrimony and mistrust, will yield neither a school that serves the needs of children nor the globally competitive country that some imagine will arrive when we replace the old with the new. Schools of the future—no matter their size, technological sophistication, or cost-effectiveness—should always begin with the best qualities of our humanity.

 

We must choose our words carefully in this fight. We must strive to retain the core values that define a school as a place that upholds the tenets of our democracy and cares about people, rather than a place that efficiently manages the system or pits stakeholders against one another. "Education," in the words of John Dewey, "is a process of living and not a preparation for future living."

 

For original post, please click on title or see here: 
http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2016/03/30/what-defines-a-good-school.html 

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The Heart-Brain Connection: The Neuroscience of Social, Emotional, and Academic Learning // Dr. Richard Davidson

Neuroscientist Richard Davidson presents his research on how social and emotional learning can affect the brain. Read more about the topic, including how to use social and emotional learning to stop bullying, on the Edutopia website: http://www.edutopia.org/social-emotional-learning 


For a direct link to the YouTube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9fVvsR-CqM 

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New Resources On Refugees // Larry Ferlazzo

New Resources On Refugees // Larry Ferlazzo | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

By Larry Ferlazzo 


"I’ve previously posted about the hysteria gripping many in the U.S. around the tragedy of Syrian refugees (see Statistic Of The Day: “rejecting Syrian refugees won’t make America safer”). I added that post to The Best Sites For Learning About World Refugee Day, and here are a few more additions to that list.


Refugees: That Time Everyone Said ‘No’ And Bolivia Said ‘Yes’ is from NPR.


Welcomed to Europe is a photo gallery from The Atlantic.


The Refugees Who Come Alone is from The Atlantic.


A perilous journey: Khalid’s flight to Europe from Syria – an illustrated account is a “comic book” from The Guardian.

Uncertain Journeys
 is an interactive from The NY Times.


Thousands of Migrants Are Crossing the Balkans on Foot is a photo gallery from The Atlantic."...



For full post, click on title above or here: http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2015/11/23/new-resources-on-refugees/ 


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Paris Attacks: Social-Emotional Learning Helps Students Process Traumatic Events

Paris Attacks: Social-Emotional Learning Helps Students Process Traumatic Events | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

"As a child in Kansas schools following the 1995 bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City, I sat with classmates in an awkward circle as we discussed our feelings about the event. What did this mean for us? Were we safe? Should we feel bad for feeling curious about how the bombing happened?


I would imagine classes all over the U.S. will have similar conversations about the Paris attacks this week.

Teachers around the country say such conversations are often necessary after these sorts of events, be they local or international. It's difficult for students to learn when their minds are focused on the snippets of scary images they absorbed while their parents watched the nightly news the day before. Such conversations are easier and more natural when students are accustomed to discussing their thoughts and experiences with their peers and teachers in a thoughtful way, they say.


Schools with existing social-emotional learning programs—through which teachers help students learn to identify, process, and regulate emotions—will have a head start in responding to events like the Paris attacks, supporters of such programs say. That's because those  programs often include a familiar format for discussing emotions and a time for open discussion. In Cleveland schools, teachers told me their social-emotional learning programs helped them discuss the police killing of 12-year-old Tamir Rice with students. In a poor part of south Los Angeles, a teacher said her students' restorative circle helped them process gang violence in their neighborhoods.


The same can be true for international events, social-emotional learning advocates say. The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence, for example, posted today about how schools that use its RULER social-emotional learning program can use its color-coded emotions chart to discuss Paris with students.


"It is important to be authentic and clear about your own feelings," the post says. "You can share with the class how difficult a weekend it was for you and how you kept thinking of the people in Paris and what feelings that raised. Identify and label your own feelings of sadness and anxiety."

The Harvard Graduate School for Education also tweeted out its guide for parents and teachers to discuss difficult events with children Monday.


The authors of the Yale post advise teachers to reassure their students of the following points:

  • Events such as the terrorist attacks in Paris are very rare and unusual.
  • Students are loved and cherished by their families and teachers.
  • It is important to talk about what they are feeling if they are concerned.
  • Their feelings are natural and normal in such a situation.
  • In our country, we are trying to always be prepared for events like this by having drills and using technology to stay aware of what is happening.
  • Adults in the community are trained to keep them safe and will always do their best to ensure that happens.
  • Teachers and school leaders in their schools have a plan for any event that may happen and will keep them safe.
  • There are many more good people in the world than bad and those people are working to make sure events such as this do not happen again.


What is the role of schools at times such as this? If you are a teacher, will you discuss the Paris attacks in your classroom?


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For full post, click on title above or here: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/rulesforengagement/2015/11/paris_attacks_social-emotional_learning_helps_students_process_big_events.html?cmp=soc-edit-tw 



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Children's Books That Encourage Kindness Towards Others

Children's Books That Encourage Kindness Towards Others | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

Kindness is one of the most important character traits, but sometimes kids need an extra reminder about the best ways to be kind to others or why kindness matters. These books provide that reminder in creative and appealing ways. Happy reading!

 

For full post, click title above or here: http://www.buzzfeed.com/emeynardie/13-childrens-books-that-encourage-kindness-toward-26paw 

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Engaged Teaching and Learning // PassageWorks Institute

Engaged Teaching and Learning // PassageWorks Institute | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

"Engaged Teaching is a practical approach to teaching and learning that improves social, emotional and academic outcomes, develops inclusive and respectful learning communities, and fosters a sense of meaning, purpose, and motivation in the classroom.

 

The practices and principles are designed to be integrated into any classroom and to transform and improve how we teach and how we engage with our students and colleagues. Whether we are veteran teachers or have just entered the field, in Engaged Teaching, we simply start where we are.

 

Cultivating our own authentic teaching practice is about each of us discovering our own unique gifts, building on our strengths, learning from others, and engaging in lifelong learning. It is about building on our best qualities, fostering meaningful and effective relationships with students, and connecting or reconnecting with our passion for teaching."...

 

For more, please click on title above or here:  http://passageworks.org/engaged-teaching/overview/#sthash.uvdRoSxQ.dpuf

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Toddler Education: Children As Young As 3 Years Old Show Understanding Of Justice And Empathy

Toddler Education: Children As Young As 3 Years Old Show Understanding Of Justice And Empathy | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

While we may struggle with delivering and exacting justice here in the adult world, it seems that children as young as 3 have the concept down pat.


In a new study published in the journal Current Biology researchers from Germany are finding that toddlers are not only surprisingly empathetic, but that concepts like restorative justice may come intuitively to them.

When examining children between the ages of three and five, researchers found their subjects focused strongly on carrying out justice and punishment for those who “deserved” it. Not only did the children prefer to give missing items back to rightful owners, but if returning the item was not an option, the participants would protect the item, and ensure another party would not take what did not belong to them. Even more interesting was the fact children of this age were just as willing to respond to the needs of another individual — even if that individual was a puppet — as they were to their own. Researchers believe these findings may give us insight into the core of justice in relation to human nature.


Kristin Magaldi


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Four Core Reasons Why Empathy May Be Compromised

Four Core Reasons Why Empathy May Be Compromised | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

By Lisa Schlesinger
"You tear up when you see commercials for abused and neglected animals. You cry with a friend who shared her feelings about a recent breakup. You even feel "touched" when you meet a stranger who hints at being lonely. You are seemingly compassionate and moved when it relates to those outside your inner circle.
 

But then you get near those closest and things change. You are cold and intolerant. You listen to your partner or your children as if you were a robot. You find that you are withholding, judgmental and cut off. Frankly, you feel the opposite of compassionate: disconnected and bothered.


Your empathy tank is low for those closest to you. Suddenly you feel as much empathy for them as you would your common criminal. Your ability to understand and share their feelings seems gone. So why can you feel empathetic towards strangers, acquaintances,and animals, but not with your own inner circle? Obviously it is more complicated with those who are in your inner circle, but there are four core reasons why your empathy is lacking."....


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/lisa-t-schlesinger/why-empathy-dissolves_b_8369494.html 


Via Edwin Rutsch
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12 Fantastic Children's Books to Help Talk About Prejudice

12 Fantastic Children's Books to Help Talk About Prejudice | Resources for Social & Emotional Learning | Scoop.it

"It's been a big few weeks for America, hasn’t it? From the heartbreak of the Charleston shootings to the landmark #LoveWins Supreme Court decision to the Girl Scouts donor dust-up, people everywhere are talking about prejudice.


While I’ve seen such a beautiful swell of love, support and compassion for all kinds of people all over my social media this past month, I’ve also talked to lots of moms who are wondering how to talk to kids about prejudice and racism. Because even as my kids help me pick out wedding presents for all our friends, prejudice most definitely still exists whether it’s because of the color of your skin or the country your family came from.


One of my favorite go-to tools for starting hard conversations with my kids is by reading books together. Reading a great story is an easy way for me to get my kids talking about concepts like open-mindedness, embracing people who are different from them, and fighting for the rights of people who have been marginalized. Even if marginalization is still a word that’s a little over their heads.
 

As you browse your bookstore or local library, here are a few tips we’ve found to be helpful when we’re looking for new titles:
 

1. Above all, make sure the story is good. Because even if the lesson is well-intentioned, your kids won’t pay attention if the book is boring.


2. Choose books with characters that are different than the people in your family.
 We’ve recently learned that only 3% of children’s books feature characters of color. That’s pretty astounding."... 



For full post, click on title above or here: http://coolmompicks.com/blog/2015/07/07/12-childrens-book-help-talk-to-kids-about-prejudice/ 



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