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Breast cancer may be treatable with inexpensive drugs

Breast cancer may be treatable with inexpensive drugs | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it

Inexpensive drugs could treat breast cancer, a new Scripps Research study finds.


Via Susan Zager
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Inexpensive drugs could treat breast cancer, a new Scripps Research study finds.

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healincomfort's curator insight, February 16, 2013 10:31 AM

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Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners
Need assistance finding resources pertinent to your cancer diagnosis, or care? Find helpful information here!
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Rescooped by Heather Swift from Breast Cancer News
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Angelina Jolie Pitt: Diary of a Surgery

Angelina Jolie Pitt: Diary of a Surgery | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it

"LOS ANGELES — TWO years ago I wrote about my choice to have a preventive double mastectomy. A simple blood test had revealed that I carried a mutation in the BRCA1 gene. It gave me an estimated 87 percent risk of breast cancer and a 50 percent risk of ovarian cancer. I lost my mother, grandmother and aunt to cancer.

I wanted other women at risk to know about the options. I promised to follow up with any information that could be useful, including about my next preventive surgery, the removal of my ovaries and fallopian tubes.

I had been planning this for some time. It is a less complex surgery than the mastectomy, but its effects are more severe. It puts a woman into forced menopause. So I was readying myself physically and emotionally, discussing options with doctors, researching alternative medicine, and mapping my hormones for estrogen or progesterone replacement. But I felt I still had months to make the date."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 25, 12:37 PM

This is really well written and empowering. Angelina Jolie opens up with such candor. It's very impressive. 

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Price of cancer drugs varies widely based on who's paying

Price of cancer drugs varies widely based on who's paying | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
Pharmacy - Article: Price of cancer drugs varies widely based on who's paying
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HBO documentary offers hope of curing cancer in the future

HBO documentary offers hope of curing cancer in the future | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it

"The phrase “a cure for cancer” is one we’ve all heard countless times — but likely never taken literally.

After all, there are more than 200 forms of cancer that can develop in any of the body’s 60-plus organs. There’s no way that a singular “cure” could be developed for all of them, right?In 2010, Dr. John Bell of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute became the first researcher to show how an injectable form of the smallpox virus could be manipulated into killing cancer cells without harming healthy tissue.

Well, maybe not just one cure — but rather multiple options for cure.

At least that’s what anyone who’s seen HBO’s remarkable documentary — VICE Special Report: Killing Cancer — can be forgiven for thinking.

The hour-long program, which debuted last week, chronicles the potentially game-changing methods being implemented in clinical trials in the U.S. and Canada.

As Shane Smith, the man behind HBO’s Emmy-winning VICE series, and the documentary’s narrator, explained, “Today in real time there is a revolution happening in the treatment of cancer and the story is almost too incredible to believe. That: (A) The diseases that used to kill us en masse like smallpox, measles, and even HIV actually hold the key to stopping this disease in its tracks; and that: (B) For the first time in medical history we just might be on the verge of curing cancer.”


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 20, 2:11 PM

To watch the episode on VICE  using viruses to kill cancer go to: http://www.vice.com/read/watch-vice-on-hbos-special-report-on-killing-cancer-217


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HBO documentary offers hope of curing cancer in the future

HBO documentary offers hope of curing cancer in the future | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it

"The phrase “a cure for cancer” is one we’ve all heard countless times — but likely never taken literally.

After all, there are more than 200 forms of cancer that can develop in any of the body’s 60-plus organs. There’s no way that a singular “cure” could be developed for all of them, right?In 2010, Dr. John Bell of the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute became the first researcher to show how an injectable form of the smallpox virus could be manipulated into killing cancer cells without harming healthy tissue.

Well, maybe not just one cure — but rather multiple options for cure.

At least that’s what anyone who’s seen HBO’s remarkable documentary — VICE Special Report: Killing Cancer — can be forgiven for thinking.

The hour-long program, which debuted last week, chronicles the potentially game-changing methods being implemented in clinical trials in the U.S. and Canada.

As Shane Smith, the man behind HBO’s Emmy-winning VICE series, and the documentary’s narrator, explained, “Today in real time there is a revolution happening in the treatment of cancer and the story is almost too incredible to believe. That: (A) The diseases that used to kill us en masse like smallpox, measles, and even HIV actually hold the key to stopping this disease in its tracks; and that: (B) For the first time in medical history we just might be on the verge of curing cancer.”


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 20, 2:11 PM

To watch the episode on VICE  using viruses to kill cancer go to: http://www.vice.com/read/watch-vice-on-hbos-special-report-on-killing-cancer-217


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Lost in Transition After Cancer

Lost in Transition After Cancer | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it

“You are being deported,” a surgeon announced to me last fall. That’s a scary thing for a child of two immigrants to hear. But he was referring to the removal of my port, a medical device implanted just beneath my right collarbone — a gateway for the dozens of rounds of chemotherapy, antibiotics and blood transfusions that have entered my body since I received a leukemia diagnosis at age 22.

I love a good pun, but I wasn’t in the mood for laughter or lightness that day. After three and a half years of cancer treatment, I no longer needed the port. My doctors had finally pronounced me in remission. I had thought I’d want to celebrate or dance a jig in my hospital gown or throw a rager when I got there. But it didn’t feel anything like the endgame I had imagined.

It took me a long time to be able to say I was a cancer patient. Then, for a long time, I was only that: A cancer patient. Now that I’m done with my treatment, I’m struggling to figure out who I am. On paper, I am better: I no longer have cancer, and with every passing day I’m getting stronger. The constant flood of doctor’s appointments, blood tests and phone calls from concerned family and friends have trickled to a slow drip. But off paper, I feel far from being a healthy 26-year-old woman."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 19, 5:17 PM

Suleika Jaouad writes, "My disease has left countless invisible imprints in its wake: infertility, premature menopause, a thyroid condition, chronic fatigue and a weakened immune system that sends me to the emergency room on a regular basis. And that’s just the short list. Then there are the demons of depression and the fears of relapse that sneak into my head just when I think I’ve gotten a grip."

View the “Life, Interrupted” video series and read previous “Life, Interrupted” columns, to learn more about Ms. Jaouad’s journey with cancer. 

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New study reveals effective treatment program for breast cancer survivors with post treatment memory loss or 'chemo brain'

New study reveals effective treatment program for breast cancer survivors with post treatment memory loss or 'chemo brain' | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
In a new study that could help improve the day-to-day quality-of-life for women with breast cancer, UCLA researchers have developed a cognitive rehabilitation program to address post-cancer...
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Take an up-close look at what patient choice really looks like

Take an up-close look at what patient choice really looks like | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
SAN FRANCISCO — Rose Gutierrez has a big decision to make. Gutierrez, who was diagnosed with breast cancer last spring, had surgery and 10 weeks of chemotherapy. But the cancer...
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Looking for that fruit or vegetable that might prevent cancer?

Looking for that fruit or vegetable that might prevent cancer? | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
The better strategy is an all-around good diet along with enough exercise to maintain a healthful weight.

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Disparities in breast cancer care linked to net worth

Disparities in breast cancer care linked to net worth | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
Household net worth is a major and overlooked factor in adherence to hormonal therapy among breast cancer patients and partially explains racial disparities in quality of care. Several studies have shown that disparities in income contribute to disparities in health care between racial and ethnic groups, but no one had specifically analyzed the effect of household net worth on quality of care in breast cancer patients until now.

Via Giuseppe Fattori
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Rescooped by Heather Swift from Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
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Virtual Community, Real Support for Breast Cancer | ASCO Connection

Virtual Community, Real Support for Breast Cancer | ASCO Connection | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it

#bcsm is not a typical cancer support group. It has no physical office, no dedicated funding, and no full-time staff. However, it does have regular meetings; every Monday at 9:00 PM EST, hundreds of people affected by breast cancer share their stories, ask questions, and discuss the disease with experts, and it all happens on Twitter. #bcsm stands for "breast cancer social media," and from this pithy hashtag has grown an enormous online community devoted to evidence-based medicine, open discourse, and compassionate support for everyone touched by breast cancer.

 


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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Tamer Yacoub's curator insight, March 2, 3:22 PM

This is a great example of Peer to peer support..

 

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Black women less likely to take breast cancer hormone therapy

Black women less likely to take breast cancer hormone therapy | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
(Reuters Health) – Among early-stage breast cancer patients in the U.S., black women are less likely than white women to take their prescribed hormone medications, according to a new study that partly - but not entirely - blames economic disparities between races.

Via Susan Zager
Heather Swift's insight:

To see the study in the Journal of Oncology go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2015/02/17/JCO.2014.58.3062

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Susan Zager's curator insight, February 20, 2:52 PM

To see the study in the Journal of Oncology go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2015/02/17/JCO.2014.58.3062


Green Hill Tea's comment, February 27, 5:09 AM
Very Nice Article
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Social media use among patients and caregivers: a scoping review - BMJ Open

Conclusions There is an extensive body of literature examining the use of social media in patient and caregiver populations. Much of this work is descriptive; however, with such widespread use, evaluations of effectiveness are required. In studies that have examined effectiveness, positive conclusions are often reported, despite non-significant findings.


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Social Media toolkit for patient association


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Cancer series can direct focus to what's important

Cancer series can direct focus to what's important | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
By Catherine L. Ormerod
When PBS's three-part documentary based on Siddhartha Mukherjee's The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer debuts tonight, the public will get to know cancer as a shadowy and deviously brilliant historical figure that has been killing and maiming men, women, and children since the beginning of recorded history. Understanding and finding cures for cancer has obsessed generations of healers, scientists, fund-raisers, politicians, and entrepreneurs.

Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 30, 3:22 PM

This looks like a great series to watch and really explains well about issues with cancer specifically breast cancer. The article also talks about Lisa Boncheck Adams. 

Wy Woods Harris's curator insight, March 31, 10:08 AM

This is such an important piece pf wisdom to be shared.#WysWaysofWellness

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Pharmacology News & Resources

Pharmacology News & Resources | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
What's new in pharmacology? Daily news updates, research, resources and study aids in...
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BMJ Blogs: The BMJ » Blog Archive » Zackary Berger and Dave deBronkart: “Precision medicine” needs patient partnership

BMJ Blogs: The BMJ » Blog Archive » Zackary Berger and Dave deBronkart: “Precision medicine” needs patient partnership | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
US President Obama recently presented the outlines of a
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Oncologists Reveal Reasons for High Cost of Cancer Drugs, Recommend Solutions

Oncologists Reveal Reasons for High Cost of Cancer Drugs, Recommend Solutions | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
Imperial Valley News Pressing all envelopes
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Metastatic Breast Cancer Series: Guide for the Newly Diagnosed

Metastatic Breast Cancer Series: Guide for the Newly Diagnosed | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
Living Beyond Breast Cancer -- LBBC connects people with trusted breast cancer information and a community of support.
Heather Swift's insight:

Metastatic Breast Cancer Series: Guide for the Newly Diagnosed
Learn the basics of metastatic breast cancer, how a metastatic breast cancer diagnosis impacts your daily life, and where to find the information and support you need to make informed decisions about your treatment and daily wellbeing. Created in partnership with Metastatic Breast Cancer Network.

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Colorectal cancer screening legislation introduced in House and Senate

Colorectal cancer screening legislation introduced in House and Senate | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
The Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act (H.R. 1220 and S. 624) was introduced in the House and Senate this month, according to a press release. This legislation would revise current Medicare policy, which charges seniors for colonoscopies if polypectomy is performed despite the fact that cancer screening colonoscopies are promoted as a free service under Medicare, the release
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No more unnecessary biopsies? Provista gets $3.9M for proteomic breast cancer tests

No more unnecessary biopsies? Provista gets $3.9M for proteomic breast cancer tests | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
Without a biopsy, it’s difficult to determine whether a woman has breast cancer. But biopsies are costly and invasive – and often, in women with fibrous breast tissue and no cancer...
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20 years after initiating preventive tamoxifen, less breast cancer but no survival benefit

20 years after initiating preventive tamoxifen, less breast cancer but no survival benefit | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it

"Five years of tamoxifen provided 20 years of breast cancer prevention to some at-risk women who took it prophylactically.

However, their 20-year all-cause mortality was no different from those taking placebo (182 vs. 166 deaths), nor was their mortality from breast cancer (31 vs. 26, respectively), Jack Cuzick, Ph.D., said at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“While we saw clear, lasting benefits of tamoxifen in reducing breast cancer incidence, uncertainty with respect to mortality remains,” said Dr. Cuzick, the John Snow professor of epidemiology at Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine at Queen Mary University, London.

He suggested that, in light of the small number of deaths, the study was not sufficiently powered to detect any significant survival difference. But women in the IBIS-1 trial will continue to be observed, and future analyses could clarify the issue, he added.

“Although 20 years seems like a long follow-up time, it is actually too early to make any clear statement about mortality,” he said. “However, we are concerned about an excess emergence of ER-negative tumors, which we saw after 10 years.”

The study was simultaneously published on Dec. 13 in Lancet Oncology"


Via Susan Zager
Heather Swift's insight:

To see the published study on Dec 13 in Lancet Oncology, go to: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanonc/article/PIIS1470-2045%2814%2971171-4/fulltext

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Rescooped by Heather Swift from Health Care Social Media And Digital Health
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Social Media Is A Lifeline For Patients With Rare Diseases

Social Media Is A Lifeline For Patients With Rare Diseases | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
This weekend marked Rare Diseases Day 2015, a name that belies the pain and courage of patients who suffer from many of these illnesses. While each of these rare diseases is uncommon, occurring in less than 200,000 people in the U.S., together they affect about 1 in 10 people.⁠ Last year, [...]

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I will include my Twitter handle on residency applications. You should, too.

I will include my Twitter handle on residency applications. You should, too. | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
It is important for medical students to start developing their social media identity and I believe medical schools could be doing more to support them.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer published

20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer published | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it

Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer globally and the leading cause of cancer-related death in women. However, the incidence of breast cancer has somewhat stabilized over the past few decades, and breast cancer mortality appears to be declining, suggesting a benefit from the combination of early detection and more effective treatment

From a surgical standpoint, said Dr. Gradishar, axillary lymph node dissection was the standard of care in 1996. Today, the less invasive sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is the standard of care for patients with early-stage breast cancer to determine spread of the disease, which has removed the risk of unnecessary extensive lymph node removal, as well as decreased the risks of post-surgical complications.

"How we thought about adjuvant therapy has changed," said Dr. Gradishar. "Physicians used to look at the number of nodes as a determinant of whether a patient was a candidate for chemotherapy, as well as what kind of chemotherapy was appropriate. Now we use genomic profiling to influence our decision-making. Additionally, the chemotherapy regimens have changed and endocrine therapy options have expanded, as has the duration of therapy."

Indeed, genomic testing and targeted therapies have changed the course of breast cancer treatment. In particular, according to Dr. Gradishar, 20 years ago human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-positive disease was not listed in the guidelines, and today the NCCN Guidelines recommendations include a cadre of successful neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapies for people with HER2-positive disease.


Via Susan Zager
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To see these new guidelines go to: http://www.nccn.org/patients/guidelines/cancers.aspx#breast

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Social Media And Its Impact on Medical Research

Social Media And Its Impact on Medical Research | Resources For People Living With A Cancer Diagnosis & Their Families & Care-Partners | Scoop.it
A social media campaign may have little (if any) effect on article readership, a recent study reports.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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