Resources to aid teaching digital technologies in the Australian Curriculum
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Resources to aid teaching digital technologies in the Australian Curriculum
This website is a curated collection of resources to aid teaching the Digital Technologies sub-strand of the drafted Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. It has been aimed at Primary school teachers. The resources will include links to, examples of and articles about programs, apps and websites that can be used to support teaching Digital Technologies. The aim is to look beyond common programs such as PowerPoint or Word to discover the wide range of resources available.
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Edmodo | Where Learning Happens | Sign up, Sign In

Edmodo provides a safe and easy way for your class to connect and collaborate, share content, and access homework, grades and school notices.
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

Edmodo is a social media website for education. Students can have their own accounts where they are limited to only interacting with their peers and teachers. Teachers can post alerts, polls, quizes and assignments for their students. All interaction can be monitered by teachers. It is a great way to teach students how to behave responsibly online without the additional online dangers that come from websites like Facebook. Edmodo could be used to assist students with homework and allow students to collaborate together. Teachers can use Edmodo to provide reminders, assignments and homework that both parents and students can access at home.

 

Edmono could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strand, 'Creating and interacting online'.

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Top uses of Skype in the Classroom

Over 13,500 teachers are using Skype in the Classroom to find other teachers and classroom to partner with. We are pleased to have helped create a global community of like-minded teachers who are using technology to help their students learn...
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

This blog post is about the top ten ways educators are using Skype within their classroom. The uses range from calling a classroom in another country during language studies to having discussions with experts in a topic the class is studying.

 

Skype could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. It could be applied to the sub-strands, 'Creating and interacting online' and, ‘Using digital systems’.

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Kodu Game Lab - Microsoft Research FUSE Labs

Kodu Game Lab - Microsoft Research FUSE Labs | Resources to aid teaching digital technologies in the Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
We are very pleased to announce the release of Kodu v1.2! In this release, we have added new storytelling features as well as a new web-based Community
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

Kodu is a Microsoft project, a very simplistic game design program. Kodu has been designed for children and has been created for both the PC and XBox. Kodu is free to download for computers and costs $5 for the XBox.

 

Kodu is similar to Scratch in some ways but slightly different in others. The programming for Kodu is very linear. Each step is numbered and very simple. The blocks used for coding include one or a few words accompanied by a large picture. This would allow students who cannot read well to use them program easier than they would be able to use Scratch which is primarily word based. Once one option is selected the program will only display the relevant options that would come next. For example when selecting the score the next blocks to pop up will be the number blocks. Kodu is also very visually appealing as it has vibrant graphics.

 

Microsoft suggests that children from ages 8 and up have the most success with Kodu, however I believe younger students would be able to create games with Kodu given the right support. This program could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strand, 'Specification, algorithms and implementation'.

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Create iOS, Android and Flash Games with Stencyl

Create iOS, Android and Flash Games with Stencyl | Resources to aid teaching digital technologies in the Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
Stencyl helps you create iOS and Flash games in a flash with or without coding.
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

Stencyl is an amazing piece of softwear that allows users to create iOS, Flash and Andriod games without coding. It is free to design and test on Flash and iOS however it does cost money to publish these games. This program would be a highly motivating program for students as most children have played app games before and many older students would know that there is a lot of money to be made in the world of apps.

 

Stencyl also has its own online community where users can play games made by others and participate in forum discussions. There is also a Blog where the creators of the program are sharing all things Stencyl related and a wiki called Stencylpedia which provides assistance, tutorials and additional information about the program.

 

Stencyl uses a click and drag 'coding' system very similar to Scratch. However, Stencyl more advanced compared to Scratch as it has many different sections that all require programming. To make this program easier to use it is best to always use a kit that includes pre-coded behaviours, "actors" (characters) and tiles (tiles are used to create scenes). Kits and individual behaviours, music, actors and tiles can be downloaded for free within the program through their store.

 

I would recommend this program to dedicated upper primary teachers who are willing to dedicate at least a semester to letting students have at least one lesson a week to fully immerse students in this program. Stencyl could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strands, 'Specification, algorithms and implementation' and ‘Managing and analysing data’. 

 

I have previously used Stencyl and I have blogged about my experience and reflections in the following posts http://digitaltechblog.weebly.com/5/post/2013/05/scratch-alternatives.html

http://digitaltechblog.weebly.com/5/post/2013/06/independent-stencyl-project.html

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100 Inspiring Ways to Use Social Media In the Classroom | Online Universities

100 Inspiring Ways to Use Social Media In the Classroom | Online Universities | Resources to aid teaching digital technologies in the Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
Social media may have started out as a fun way to connect with friends, but it has evolved to become a powerful tool for education and business.

Via JackieGerstein Ed.D.
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

This article lists several different Social Media resources and suggestions regarding how they can be used in the classroom. These resources could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. There resources can be applied to the sub-strands, 'Creating and interacting online' and, 'Managing and analysing data". Different resources are suited to different year levels. 

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Scratch | Home | imagine, program, share

Scratch | Home | imagine, program, share | Resources to aid teaching digital technologies in the Australian Curriculum | Scoop.it
Scratch: a programming language for everyone. Create interactive stories, games, music and art - and share them online.

Via Peter Albion
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

Scratch is a great program that could be introduced at any grade. It allows children to program. This programming ranges from very basic to very complex. The website provides galleries that feature users' creations, suggestions of things to program, support and a forum. This program could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strand, 'Specification, algorithms and implementation' for every year level.

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Emma Pails's curator insight, March 6, 2014 8:36 PM

This interactive resource has been scooped by Peter Albion’s page, as it triggered my thinking about how programing stories, games, animations and newly made creations could be done in the classroom.

 

Multiple educators have been supporting the Scratch creators since 2007, in both formal and informal learning environments throughout all primary year levels.

 

When first looking at this resource I instantly thought how it could be used and implemented within classrooms, allowing 21st century learners to develop the skills required to become active and engaged citizens of society (MCEETYA, 2008). Some of the skills this resource allows the primary year students to develop is to think creatively, reason systematically, and work collaboratively.

 

In regards to the Australian Curriculum (2013), there are clear links evident between the Scratch resource and The Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (2013) strand. In particular Design and Technologies, as it allows students to use design thinking to generate design ideas, to in turn communicate them to a variety of audiences (ACARA – Technology, 2013).

 

Content descriptors that could be aligned with a lesson sequence that incorporate the use of the Scratch resource include: Design and Technologies Processes 4.6, 4.8 and 4.9.

Jacynta Baker's curator insight, March 13, 2014 5:36 AM

 Scratch is an online source that is a highly effective and creative choice of technology. This seven year old creation can be implemented into a primary classroom allowing students and educators to develop games, stories and endless individualized creations. By employing this fantastic online source into a learning environment educators are assisting students in developing lifelong skills such as working collaboratively and thinking creatively. This can be linked to many key learning areas from the Australian Curriculum (2013), in particular Technology.

Pearta Nolan's curator insight, June 5, 2014 9:41 PM

Scratch (2014) is an online program that can assist students to complete and share interactive media.  There is also the added benefit of students being able to collaborate and share with people from all over the world.  Some of the benefits of scratch include; stories, games and animation.  Direct alignment between Scratch (2014) and the Australian Curriculum Technologies (ACARA, 2014) are evident within multiple content descriptors in the Digital Technologies process and production skills allotment.  Students are scaffolded to implement digital solutions as visual programs with algorithms involving decisions, repition and input, furthermore students are to design, modify and follow simple algorithms including a sequence of steps, decisions and input (ACARA, 2014).

 

Whilst completing the Scratch activities I found that it was best to follow the instructions to get a general understanding of the program.  Once this was achieved, I found that I was more confident in trailing new steps; I created a scratch that involved a helicopter swooping down to collect the cat and taking it into the sky.  Throughout this activity I learnt to have a go and trial new things and remember that there is always a help section.  Overall I believe that this was very exciting activity and I can the application to school as smooth transition.  

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How to Use Google Documents : How to Make a Chart in Google Documents

Making a chart in Google documents is easy with these tips, get expert advice on business software and the internet in this free video. Expert: Drew Noah Bio...
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

This video tutorial explains how Google Documents can be used to create a graph/chart. An alternative set of instructions to assist in creating a graph can be found at http://support.google.com/drive/bin/answer.py?hl=en&answer=63728 . Google Documents can be used to make digital, professional graphs/charts. This could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strand, 'Managing and analysing data'. The way in which data is managed and analysed aligns with the curriculum from year 3 upwards, although I would probably not use this until about year 5. Students in year 7 would be more suited to independently use these tools with scaffolding and modelling provided when necessary. For younger years this could easily be created as a whole class with the teacher managing and supporting the use of the tool.

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Little Bird Tales - Home

Little Bird Tales: Capture the Voice of Childhood. We offer a fun,unique way to create,record and share stories online.
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

Little Bird Tales is a program where children can sequence pictures and add their own text and speech. This program could be used to support story telling and sequencing in English. Children could take their own photos, upload them with the assistance of their teacher and then narrate their own story. If this is how the program was used then students would learn how to use a digital camera, upload photos onto the computer, store and acess digital files, label digital images and select digital images. All of these processes are a part of digital technologies.

 

Little Bird Tales could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. It could be applied to the sub-strands, 'Managing and organising data' and, ‘Using digital systems’. It would be best suited to lower and middle primary classrooms.

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Mary McLaren's comment, June 9, 2013 2:11 AM
I love this idea of capturing your child's voice and imagination! I wish I'd done it when my kids were younger, but might still give it a go. I always see sites or programs recommending adults such as grandparents record stories for grandkids far away, but saving a bit of your child when they are little would be so precious. Would be great to use in the classroom as well.
Mary McLaren's comment, June 9, 2013 2:12 AM
Feel free to check out my curation on technology for ESL students. http://www.scoop.it/t/technology-education-for-eal-students.http://www.scoop.it/t/technology-education-for-eal-students
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The Padagogy Wheel V2.0

Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

This great graphic takes Bloom's Taxonomies and puts a 21 century spin on it by adding iPad apps that can be used to support each verb. A video of the creator, Allan Carrington, explaining his wheel can be accessed here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAYVQlUVpK4&feature=youtu.be

 

This wheel could be extremely valuable for teachers as not only does it reinforce higher order thinking but it also encourages the use of digital technologies. These apps could be used to support the Digital Technologies strands for the drafted Technologies subject in the Australian Curriculum. Different apps would be suitable for different sub-strands, band descriptors and year levels.

 

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Computer programming with Espresso Primary - the teachers' views.

Teachers from Merridale Primary and eLearning consultants of Wolverhampton City Council share their views on how the Espresso Computer programming module can...
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

This short video discusses the positivies of teaching young children about programming. In this primary classroom the students are using Scratch to create a game as a class. It is stated that teaching students how to create a game also inculdes elements of team work, mathematics and storytelling. The teacher offers advice about getting to know the program first and finding a game online that you feel would be suitable to recreate with your students.


In an Australian context, teaching children how to program could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strand, 'Specification, algorithms and implementation' for every year level. 

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Why Your School Needs A Scratch Club

This past year, fourth and fifth grade students at Independence Elementary School in Yukon, Oklahoma, have had the opportunity to participate in an after-sch...
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

I've already shared my insights about the amazing code free programming language for children, Scratch. As previously mentioned, Scratch could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strand, 'Specification, algorithms and implementation' for every year level.


In this video we hear why children love Scratch! These students attend their school's after school Scratch club. It is great to see authentic examples of programs primary school aged children have created using Scratch and hear how positive of an experience it has been for them. The teacher adds that Scratch is great for supporting STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) skills. On top of supporting STEM skills it is also apparent in this video that Scratch allows students to showcase their talent and creativity. 

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Digital Citizenship: Resource Roundup | Edutopia

Check out Edutopia's collection of articles, videos, and resources on cyberbullying, netiquette, and internet safety.

Via Judy O'Connell
Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

This is a great curated collection of resources about Digital Citizenship. These resources could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strand, 'Creating and interacting online'. Different resources are suited to different year levels. Digital Citizenship is an important part of Digital Technologies as students are required to use the correct social protocols ("netiquette") and stay safe when they are online. 

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Create A Graph

Ashleigh Rollings's insight:

This is an alternative website designed for the creating of graphs and charts. This website is designed for children, thus the layout is more user friendly. This could be used to support the Digital Technologies processes and production skills strand of the proposed Technologies learning area of the Australian Curriculum. In particular, it relates to the sub-strand, 'Managing and analysing data'. This way data is gathered and presented analysed aligns with the curriculum. The main difference between this website and the Google Documents tool for creating graphs is the input of data. This website uses a simple version of a spreadsheet that would be more age appropriate for year 3 and 4 students compared to Google Documents' tool.

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