Resources addressing HSIE SSS1.8.11: Family, school and community rules and their purposes
57 views | +0 today
Follow
Resources addressing HSIE SSS1.8.11: Family, school and community rules and their purposes
Curating HSIE web resources for SSS1.8.11, annotated with resource evaluations and suggestions for implementation and lesson ideas.
Curated by Alicia Rankine
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Alicia Rankine
Scoop.it!

David Goes to School

There is another audio book from Ihsan Dogramaci Bilkent Erbil College. We hope you enjoy listening.
Alicia Rankine's insight:

This online reading of David Shannon’s “David Goes to School” provides an accessible and engaging piece of literature that can act as a catalyst for questions such as ‘why do we have school rules?’ It could also providing a starting point for considering the roles and responsibilities of both the student and the teacher. Scholastic provides a rich array of supplementary resources and teaching ideas (http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/book/david-goes-school), but the most relevant way to use this resource when teaching SS1.8.11 would be a deconstruction of what is implied in the text.

The story depicts David’s perspective of the school rules, wherein he is constantly in trouble without justification, and as the book progresses, he feels he is constantly facing the word “no”, until he is given a seemingly random piece of praise on the last double page spread. One lesson idea for this would be to have students discover which rule he was breaking on each page, requiring them to engage their visual literacy skills, as this is often only implied. For example, one double page spread reads “Again?” and is illustrated by an image of David raising his hand and looking uncomfortable, implying he needs to use the bathroom but has already gone, breaking the rule of going to the toilet during class time. In small groups, students could use these discoveries to construct a list of school rules for David’s school. They could then create suggestions for behaviours David could have performed to avoid getting into trouble, or they could compare David’s school’s rules to their own school’s rules.

Further, students could engage critical literacy skills to consider what the text is trying to make them think about rules – does the text see rules and useful or restrictive? Using rich literature in the HSIE classroom heightens students’ engagement, especially in Stage 1, and using this text allows for students to work towards HSIE and literacy outcomes simultaneously. They are understanding the role of the student, the purpose of rules, and how students and teachers interact. They are also developing their literacy skills, taking on multiple ‘roles of the reader’ to fulfil this activity – acting as a text participant when they are working together to make meaning from the text, working as a text user when they use the text to extrapolate information about school rules generally, and working as a text analyst when they consider how the text positions them to think about rules (Winch 2011, pp 26-27). Though these activities could be performed using a hard copy of the text, projecting this reading onto a big screen with loud volume makes it more accessible to students with sensory impairments.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alicia Rankine
Scoop.it!

Yiwarra Kuju video clips

Yiwarra Kuju video clips | Resources addressing HSIE SSS1.8.11: Family, school and community rules and their purposes | Scoop.it
Alicia Rankine's insight:

Featured on the website of the National Museum of Australia, in this video  Martu elder Friday Jones introduces members of the Canning Stock Route project team and Birriliburu artists to Jilakurra Country. This video is part of a large project exploring “2 sides of history” by investigating Aboriginal perspectives of the Canning Stock Route. It is useful to this HSIE subject matter as the video reveals to students rules this particular Aboriginal group, the Martu people, use when travelling into new country.

This subject matter is particularly difficult to find appropriate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander resources for according to the Selection Criteria provided by the Government of SA (2013). Resources which cover rules in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families, schools and communities largely focus on pre-colonial community structures, leading to the perpetuation of the idea that Aboriginal culture is a ‘lost culture’, limited to the past. Further, it seems that most resources which aim to enlighten students on Aboriginal family structures presume that no Aboriginal students are present in the classroom, tend to create an ‘us’ and ‘them’ dichotomy instead of fostering an understanding of commonality and differences in all families and communities.

Though this resource is quite short, it stands out from other more detailed resources attempting to cover this subject matter by providing a perspective created by and in consultation with Aboriginal community members, which is also contemporary. The resource formerly acknowledges Aboriginal contribution here: http://www.canningstockrouteproject.com/collaborations/consultants-and-contributors/.

Teachers using this short clip as a resource should be advised to actively prevent overgeneralising by acknowledging these rules are those of a particular group, the Martu people, and are not necessarily practiced by all Aboriginal people.

To create a lesson that helps students learn about rules in the family, school and community using this resource, the author suggests using this clip in conjunction with information on particular rules and customs upheld by a variety of cultural groups. Other resources collected on this Scoopit focus on general community rules, whereas this lesson could focus on rules particular to different cultural and/or religious groups, which don’t apply to all community members and are constructed based on beliefs and history instead of community safety or function. After noting what particular rules are displayed in the video, the teacher could lead a discussion on the nature of these rules compared to previous rules like dog regulations (i.e. who the rules are created by, who should follow them, why they were created). Other resources, such as clips of appropriate behaviour in churches, temples or mosques, or cultural practices such as taking shoes off before entering homes in Hindu cultures, should then be treated with similar discussions. Ultimately, students could learn about how rules are created for many different purposes, and that different groups of people adhere to different sets of rules, fostering intercultural understanding within students.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alicia Rankine
Scoop.it!

What Kids Can Do

Alicia Rankine's insight:

The “What Kids Can Do” website’s investigation into students’ opinions on the rules around eating in the school provides an inspiration point for an inquiry learning approach to teaching about school rules. This an important website for teachers to visit, as its model of focusing on the voices of students and their unique perspectives is especially relevant in such a potentially teacher-centric subject area as SS1.8.11 In a field that could easily translate into teachers providing a downwards exposition on set rules, this page demonstrates how questioning students on their perceptions of school rules can open a meaningful discussion on how they interact with rules and whether the rules fulfil their purpose.

Modelling this investigation as a lesson plan would involve selecting a certain set of school rules, which in this resource is the often hidden or taken for granted ‘eating’ rules, and asking students about what they believe their purpose is, whether they are effective, and where they could be improved. This engages multiple forms of knowledge according to Harbemas’ classification: technical, as they understand what the rules are and how they could be improved, interpretive, as they consider why the rules were formed and why they support or criticise them, and emancipatory, as they propose ways to alter the rules so they fulfil the needs of both teachers and students more effectively (cited in Hoepper, in Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.47).

So long as clear boundaries are set by the teacher in regards to the importance of maintaining particular school structures, modelling this discussion as a lesson plan could be empowering in a HSIE classroom by giving students the ability to critically reflect on their micro world, while assisting them to understand their and the teachers’ roles within the school environment. This child-centred approach to HSIE on ‘What Kids Can Do’ echoes the HSIE curriculum’s goal of creating students who understand and reflect on how they interact with their world in a student-centred learning environment (NSW BOS, 2006, pp.5-6).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alicia Rankine
Scoop.it!

The Families of the World | Learn about how people live around the world.

The Families of the World | Learn about how people live around the world. | Resources addressing HSIE SSS1.8.11: Family, school and community rules and their purposes | Scoop.it
Families of the World is a highly acclaimed award-winning educational video series documenting how children and their families live in 17 countries around the world
Alicia Rankine's insight:

The “Families of the World” website provides hundreds of age appropriate 1 minute vignettes on the daily lives of children in places all over the world. The clear language and visual support enables students to come to understand how others around the globe live, facilitating teachers to provide a global perspective on many subject areas for HSIE, including school, family and community rules.

Because of the diverse range of videos available on this site, teachers need to carefully select those appropriate for each lesson, but for learning about rules, the Families of Philippines (Urban), Families of Kenya (Urban), Familes of Afghanistan (Urban) and Families of Mexico (Urban) videos provide insights into rules in the home and at school that can be clearly compared to rules in students’ current Australian environments. Further teacher intervention will likely be needed to provide context for the videos, for example locating countries on a world map and providing some prior knowledge about the country, to ensure students take full advantage of the brief snapshots provided to them. The short length of the videos means they can easily be re-watched while engaging the students’ attention.

Dyer (in Gilbert and Hoepper, eds. 2011) explains that effective pedagogies for diversity education go beyond knowledge acquisition, by asking students to critically respond. To effectively use these films in a HSIE classroom learning about rules in the family, school and community, a T-Chart comparing Australian rules against another countries’ helps students understand commonalities and difference, while role play of rules in other countries helps students to deeply understand roles and responsibilities within global families, schools and communities. As an assessment, students could create a ‘Families of the World’ inspired video explaining the rules in their own environment that could be understood around the world, drawing on many cross-curriculum skills and asking students to critically reflect on the familiar by considering how it may be ‘foreign’ to others, helping them develop a global perspective. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Alicia Rankine
Scoop.it!

Behind the News - 06/09/2011: Dangerous Dogs

Behind the News - 06/09/2011: Dangerous Dogs | Resources addressing HSIE SSS1.8.11: Family, school and community rules and their purposes | Scoop.it
There have been a few stories in the news recently about kids being badly attacked by dangerous dogs Its led one state government to bring in new laws to try to crack down on certain breeds of dogs
Alicia Rankine's insight:

By exploring new developments in dog regulations and their purpose in Australian communities, this BTN video provides an opportunity for students to explore the creation, function and response to rules within the community. Using De Bono’s ‘Six Thinking Hats’ to consider these rules can foster a lesson that allows students to critically consider these particular rules, and how the correlate with roles and responsibilities of the government and citizens within society. A lesson sequence using this video should begin with a KWL chart to focus students’ learning on rules about dog ownership.

Using De Bono’s Six Thinking Hats, students could deconstruct the video to gain a deeper understanding of rules in the community. To begin the lesson, using the Red Hat’s knowledge, students could draw a pictorial response to the video, detailing how they feel about the rules for dangerous dogs; for example, fearful, sad, or glad. Using the White Hat, students could investigate what they learnt about the new rules, noting the reasons the government provided for implementing them, and any statistical information provided. After gathering factual information, students should compare their initial emotional response to the image the facts create. Using the Black Hats, the teacher should lead the students through a critical analysis of how the journalist engendered their emotional response, considering the use of music as well as the juxtaposition of angry barking dogs and happy puppies, heavily drawing on students’ critically literacy skills.

With the Yellow Hat, students could then collaboratively discuss the positive reasons for dog ownership, and think positively about how the rules they have established with their pets in their own homes have encouraged positive relationships with their dog, perhaps drawing inspiration from texts such as “The Trouble with Dogs” by Bob Graham. Drawing on their creativity,  students should be split into small groups and given the task of designing a list of rules for both dog owners and community members, detailing what behaviours they should implement to ensure interactions between people and dogs remain positive. The creation of a list of rules that are fair and which serve different stake holders can serve as an assessment task for this mini-unit, as it demonstrates to the teacher that students understand the function of rules, how rules affect behaviour, and who creates rules.

To finish the lesson sequence, students could use the Blue Thinking Hat to complete their KWL chart, which can then be displayed in the classroom.

more...
No comment yet.