Resourcing the Curriculum K-6
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Summer Book Selections For Your 5th-12th Grader

Summer Book Selections For Your 5th-12th Grader | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Great book selections from Beaverton School District Book
Expert/Connoisseur, Jen Blair.

Summer slide is a concern for all parents. It's that time when schedules
are off and students can fall in to bad habits. I am living proof of that.
I stayed up until 3AM watching tape delayed summer league basketball while
snacking on Flamin' Hot Cheetos. The one thing I have been doing this
summer is reading....and before you ask, yes, reading books. I read the
"interwebs" all the time, but I have fi

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Map creator online to make a map with multiple locations and regions

Map creator online to make a map with multiple locations and regions | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Create a map from location list, crowd source, spreadsheets, etc. Publish, share interactive maps. Mapping of radius, administrative, and other regions. Map images.

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QR Codes in the Classroom

QR Codes in the Classroom | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Quick response (QR) codes are easy to create and have many uses in the classroom. With the posting of a QR code, you can lead students to information by just using their computer's or mobile device's...

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, May 7, 2015 10:46 PM

There are many affordances for QR codes in history. Pose an historical inquiry question and get students to gather clues (evidence) using primary sources embedded with a QR code at a museum, local community, school etc. Or, get primary students to create their own QR codes for artefacts. This could engage students in historical inquiry and the analysis and use of primary and secondary sources.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:09 PM

There are many affordances for QR codes in history. Pose an historical inquiry question and get students to gather clues (evidence) using primary sources embedded with a QR code at a museum, local community, school etc. Or, get primary students to create their own QR codes for artefacts. This could engage students in historical inquiry and the analysis and use of primary and secondary sources.

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Songlines

Colin Jones, lecturer in Aboriginal History, talks about his culture, his history and his art.

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Cristalina Rinaldi's curator insight, April 11, 2015 11:10 PM

This resource is a YouTube clip explaining the notion of Indigenous Australian navigation, known as songlines. Colin Jones, a lecturer in Aboriginal history, explores how songlines are a complex network of tracks in the land derived from the route taken by ‘creator-beings’ from the dreaming. As Aboriginal people move along these songlines, they sing. In this sense, songlines can be understood as oral mapping of the land. Songlines therefore represent navigation and cardinal direction from an Indigenous perspective. A primary outcome communicated through the HSIE syllabus is to teach students to empathise with others in order to better understand the society to which they belong (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 7). This involves embedding the perspective of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples into all aspects of studies.

 

This video is an insightful teaching resource as it presents a concise yet well-informed understanding of the significance of oral navigation in the everyday lives of Aboriginal people. It links to outcome ENS2.5 in HSIE syllabus, and would therefore provide the basis of a relevant and engaging lesson for stage 2 students. Teachers can teach about songlines in the context of the dreamtime story “The Rainbow Serpent”. This story would be an appropriate and accessible vehicle through which to explain how the path taken by the Rainbow Serpent represents a songline. Teachers could also invite an Aboriginal elder from the local community into the classroom to discuss and share examples of songlines with the students. This ensures authenticity and accuracy is maintained.

 

As a resource, this clip meets the criteria put forward by the Indigenous Perspective Guidelines (2007). The fact that Colin Jones is of Aboriginal descent increases the legitimacy of this resource. He is sharing his knowledge and experiences of his culture and it is therefore expected that the information is authentic, balanced and accurate. When used as a teaching resource, teachers can be assured that this video is both sensitive and adequate in its treatment of Indigenous perspectives.

 

Board of Studies (2006). Human Society and its Environment K-6 Syllabus NSW: Board of Studies.

 

Queensland Studies Authority (2007). Selecting and evaluating resources. Retrieved from https://www.qsa.qld.edu.au/.../indigenous_g008_0712.pdf

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Teacher Resource: My Place


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Samantha Doherty's curator insight, April 12, 2015 11:39 AM

My Place (1988), available from  http://www.walkerbooks.com.au/Books/Walker-Classics-My-Place-9781921150654 , is a picture book written by Nadia Wheatley and illustrated by Donna Rawlins. The story focuses on one area in Australia and travels back in time 200 years from 1988 to 1788, with many different children describing their lives and their surrounding community over time. With each child's story, only some aspects oe the area such as the fig tree remain the same, while everything else seems to change around them.

 

Description of Site:

This teacher resource is fantastic for teaching Stage 2 HSIE in relation to cause and effect of community change. Classroom ideas are divided according to educational themes, and I feel the ‘Connecting with the Land, Environment and History’ section would be most valuable to approaching my topic area in the classroom.

 

Teaching Ideas:

This resource provides multiple opportunities for students to develop their skills working with maps and timelines, which would allow a visual representation of community change throughout the book. I would suggest first mapping changes in the community within My Place, before then considering the students’ own community. Students could use Google Maps to examine different areas of their local or school community, and either visit their local library or look up map archives to view geographical change over time. Beyond this, students could begin to consider the effects of such changes, and what that might mean for the local community in the future.

This resource also has potential links to Aboriginal history, as students could be asked to research and map their local Indigenous history on a timeline.

 

Differentiation Activity:

When working with multiple ability levels, an extension for this timeline activity could be to view an episode of the 26-part ABC series based on this book and complete a worksheet.

For example,

http://www.myplace.edu.au/themes/culture.html has a number of clips students can view regarding local culture and change, before completing a resource sheet to challenge their thinking.

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School Field Trips Go Virtual

School Field Trips Go Virtual | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
The field trip, a classic school ritual, is getting a makeover, with more schools videoconferencing their students all over the globe in lieu of packing them up and busing them to cultural events.

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Javier Castro's curator insight, June 21, 2015 3:47 PM

añada su visión ...

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Visible Thinking

Visible Thinking | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 13, 2015 12:08 AM

Here is a treasure trove of research-based strategies, protocols and routines to foster thinking and understanding.

Ness Crouch's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:44 PM

Here is a treasure trove of research-based strategies, protocols and routines to foster thinking and understanding.

Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, August 4, 2015 7:23 AM

Here is a treasure trove of research-based strategies, protocols and routines to foster thinking and understanding.

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Upcycling Kids

Upcycling Kids | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
By now we all know the kind of stuff that can be recycled like glass, cans, cardboard and cartons. But what about all of the other stuff that we throw out? Isn't there something that can be done with all that stuff? Well there is. Here's Carl to show you.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 18, 2015 1:52 AM

Upcycling is the process of converting waste materials or useless products into new materials or products of better quality or for better environmental value.


In HSIE K-6, students learn about their relationships with places and environmental sustainabilty through an Inquiry Process. Pose an inquiry question and scaffold learning so that students have the opportunity to acquire information, develop inquiry skills (e.g. identifying, gathering, communicating) and participate in social and civic life.


Although this topic strongly aligns with the Environments strand (ENS.6) in the NSW HSIE K-6 syllabus there is scope for integration with other curriculum areas. Adopt an integrated approach and align with Creative Arts or Mathematics (e.g. data collection, graphing, statistics) or Science and Technology (e.g. design and make)


For further inspiration and nifty ideas, check out http://www.upcyclethat.com/


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ABC Splash Early Primary History - splash.abc.net.au

ABC Splash Early Primary History - splash.abc.net.au | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
History video, audio clips and games for Early Primary - Foundation (the first year of schooling) to Year 3

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, October 8, 2013 1:00 AM

Short clips and teacher notes for K-3 Australian history topics as well as content in the NSW HSIE K-6 syllabus.

Jemma Tanner's curator insight, October 29, 2013 5:47 AM

I love this website! It features short clips and teacher notes for prep to threes on Australian history topics - upper primary can be found on the tab at the top of the webpage. I think that this is a great resource because it covers issues from sustainability to multiculturalism while still keeping it at the level of the students. I'd use it in the classroom just as I'd use My Place; by showing the video/s and creating activities around the themes presented in them.

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A significant local site | AC History Units

A significant local site | AC History Units | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, September 12, 2014 3:32 AM

In this Unit of Work, developed by the History Teachers' Association of Australia, Year 2 students explore how their school has changed over time.

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1788: Was life the same for everyone? Year 4 Unit of Work

1788: Was life the same for everyone? Year 4 Unit of Work | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, February 8, 2015 8:28 PM

In this Unit of Work, Year 4 students adopt an historical inquiry approach to learn about what life was like in 1788 through a range of different texts. Assessment tasks include creating an informative text and an historical narrative excerpt.

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Year 5 History: Chinese Migration and the Gold Rush

Year 5 History: Chinese Migration and the Gold Rush | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
The reasons people migrated to Australia from Europe and Asia, and the experiences and contributions of a particular migrant group within a colony. (ACHHK096)

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Lives and stories of colonial women

Lives and stories of colonial women | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
These are the stories of five different Colonial women, Trukanini, Theresa Sutcliffe Mort, Mary Windeyer, Caroline...

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, March 3, 2015 7:48 PM

Love the idea of using artworks to build a picture of life in early colonial times. The national Portrait Gallery is certainly doing a great job of connecting us through  artworks to our curriculum documents

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Magna Carta an introduction

Magna Carta an introduction | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
‘to no one will we sell, to no one deny or delay right or justice

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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, May 11, 2015 7:17 PM

AC History Year 6

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Aboriginal people and place - Barani

Aboriginal people and place - Barani | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Aboriginal people and place Sydney Barani history Gadigal

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Learn about the history of the clock at the Hyde Park Barracks - YouTube

Learn about Australia's longest continually operating public clock and the effect it had on the early colony. Music written and performed by Cameron Emerson-...

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WilderQuest Learning | NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service

WilderQuest Learning | NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
WilderQuest Learning is a free educational resource developed by NSW National Parks. It's designed for teachers to access teaching and learning activities for primary school students.

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Jennifer Lim's curator insight, April 12, 2015 10:37 AM

This website provides abundant resources and tools that enables students to understand and investigate the living world and its features. It runs many innovative curriculum based programs where students are given the opportunity to experience the natural world and learn about its significant uses. Through this opportunity students can also feel the need to care for our nature.  

 

There is a game available on the website http://wilderquest.nsw.gov.au/flash/#/map-index, that is made accessible to learn at any point in time, in and outside of the classroom. This game allows students to explore different natural features such as alpine, woodlands, rainforest, coast, desert etc and play game at the same time. This kind of digital learning resource can be a powerful tool that can support interactive and engaging learning. Classrooms can address even the most difficult content in a lighthearted, engaging way thus place a significant effect on student achievement, Marzano (2010). 


Marzano, R. (2010). The Art and Science of Teaching/Using Games to Enhance Student Achievement. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/feb10/vol67/num05/Using-Games-to-Enhance-Student-Achievement.aspx ;

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What [we] can learn from other food cultures

What [we] can learn from other food cultures | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Food feeds the soul. To the extent that we all eat food, and we all have souls, food is the single great unifier across cultures. But what feeds your soul?

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 11, 2015 10:25 PM

This TEDx talk lays out some useful concepts to organise learning about other food cultures. Some of the ideas can be adapted to develop  intercultural understanding in primary HSIE/SOSE.

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 19, 2015 3:19 PM

Unit 3: Cultural Practices and Processes 

 

This article is about food and its use in identity and culture. Food often represents where we came from and our experiences. Each culture has specific foods that have a great significance to us and no matter hwere we go, we tend to gravitate toward those foods. The article also talks about how food represents out status due to higher priced foods are usually bought by higher stature people. Food is also used for pleasure and celebration as well as to nourish our bodies. 

 

This relates to unit 3 because food is a big cultural trait. Different cultures eat different foods depending on their area and beliefs. Food has no many uses and can say a lot about the person. Food is used in celebrations as a way to express our cultures and show what it is important to us. Food brings us together as similar cultures share similar interests and beliefs. 

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Project-based learning: essential questions and authentic tasks

Project-based learning: essential questions and authentic tasks | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Essential questions and authentic tasks work together in a project-based learning environment

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 17, 2015 8:53 PM

Some nice ideas for a problem-based approach to learning about Migration. Drive the inquiry with an effective and essential question and design authentic tasks to deepen understanding.

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 17, 2015 8:57 PM

Drive historical inquiry with effective questions and design authentic assessment tasks when teaching history in the primary school.


Ness Crouch's curator insight, August 3, 2015 9:03 PM

Some nice ideas for a problem-based approach to learning about Migration. Drive the inquiry with an effective and essential question and design authentic tasks to deepen understanding.

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National Centre for History Education - Commonwealth History Project

National Centre for History Education - Commonwealth History Project | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
National Centre for History Education ? Hyperhistory - the website of resources for teachers and students of history in Australian primary and secondary schools.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, March 18, 2015 8:43 PM

Essential reading, accessible research, practical ideas for teaching  history in primary classrooms. Dip in to the The Teachers' Guide, 'Making History: a guide for the teaching and learning of history in Australian schools'.

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Differing perspectives: Australia Day / Invasion Day

Differing perspectives: Australia Day / Invasion Day | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Most Australians celebrate Australia Day as the day Australia was founded.

In contrast, Aboriginal people mourn their history and call it ‘Invasion Day’.

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Thanh Thuong Nguyen's curator insight, April 12, 2014 11:26 PM

Through the meaning implied in Aboriginal celebration of Survival Day, the page introduces Aboriginal perspective about the contemporary issue existing in Australia. When Australian people are celebrating Australian Day, many Aboriginal people found there is little to celebrate with the same meaning; rather, they celebrate Survival Day that implies their commemoration of a deep loss_ the loss of their rights to their land, loss of family, loss of the right to practice their culture. The source also includes Aboriginal participation by representing difference voices of Aboriginal people about the issue. The site also emphasises the account of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal history by introducing the emerging thinking in some Australians about the concept of “Arrival Day” celebration in which both Indigenous and Australian history are praised and promoted.


The source provides teachers with a different perspective from which they can design teaching activities that promote students developing different viewpoints. This is a useful resource for teachers not only in term of obtaining information to teach the concept and the origin of Australia Day, but also in term of teaching the story implied in the event viewed from an Aboriginal point of view. By applying the idea of this resource into teaching, teachers would be able to raise students’ awareness of the diversity that has been existed since the foundation of the country in which they are living, and advise them the existing discrimination that they should avoid. When carry on any teaching activities that requires students to collect data about the event from different perspective, it is crucial for teachers to provide enough guidance to students in order to avoid encountering sensitivity and offensiveness.

Bianca Levins's curator insight, March 29, 2015 7:40 AM

Through poetry, song and stories, this page offers Aboriginal perspectives on Australia day. After several lessons spent discussing what Australia Day means to different people, this resource asks students to think deeper about the day and its significance for Aboriginal people.

 

Many Aboriginal people call January 26 Invasion Day or Survival Day. Why is that? To clarify their thoughts, students could complete a fishbone diagram (Global Education, 2014). Global Education suggest labeling the scales with “how, why, when, where and what” (2014). For example, ‘HOW does this person feel? WHY do they feel this way? WHAT does this make me feel?’

 

Students could expand their individual ideas in an independent assessment task, looking at the Creative Spirits site. Students could choose to present their findings in a variety of ways, for example as a poem about how a particular story made them feel to be read at assembly (inspired by a project at Coffs Harbour Public School), a report for the class blog, or an educational poster to display in the school to raise awareness.  

 

REFERENCES:

Global Education. (2014). Retrieved 31 March, 2015 from http://globaleducation.edu.au/verve/_resources/fishbone.pdf

 

Coffs Harbour Public School (2015). Retrieved 31 March, 2015 from http://coffsharbourpublicschool.edublogs.org/2014/03/20/august-6th-1945-nagasaki-and-hiroshima-bombings-by-6h/#more-5160

 

Claire Reinthal's curator insight, April 20, 2015 6:00 AM

 

 

Description of what is on this site:

 

This resource explains the HSIE outcome at CCS2.2 in relation to what has become known as Australia Day but is mourned as Invasion Day by many Aboriginal people.

 

This is done by looking at Australia Day over time and from the perspective of different Aboriginal people and the impacts the arrival of the British had on their family members/ancestors and on them personally.

 

This is a good follow-on resource from First Australians, Episode 1, since it gives the perspectives of people of today on the events which happened in 1788 and their impacts now. 

 

 

A teaching idea and link to relevant pedagogical research:

 

Working in groups, students could be asked to look at the changes in the community and family life and impacts of these due to the arrival of the British, January 26, 1788 and to create a timeline of events which caused these changes or resulted from them, including quotes from different Aboriginal people.

 

The students could be told that this task would be assessed and students asked to help devise a rubric for assessing this outcome since "...learning is best achieved when students are actively involved in the teaching and learning process." (Bobis, Mulligan, & Lowrie, 2013, p. 291). This lessons learning would be assessed formatively.

  

 

A literacy strategy/link to English KLA:

 

Again, this task would also be fulfilling outcomes in the NSW English Syllabus for the Australian Curriculum such as:

EN2-6B 'distinguishes between different forms of English' and 'identifies organisational patterns and features' and 'listen to and contribute to conversations and discussions to share information and ideas'.

 

 

References:

 

Bobis, J.,Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2013). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically. Frenchs Forest: Pearson Australia.

 

Creative Spirits, Jens Korff (2014). Australia Day – Invasion Day. Retrieved April 20, 2015, from http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/history/australia-day-invasion-day#toc0

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Convict Lives

Convict Lives | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Stories of convict transportation to Australia, from the collections of the State Library of New South Wales.

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Catherine Smyth's curator insight, February 3, 2015 6:50 PM

Teaching about convicts? Check out the array of online digital resources on this State Library NSW Pinterest board.

Catherine Smyth's curator insight, February 3, 2015 6:53 PM

Teaching about convicts? Check out this wonderful range of online digital resources on the NSW State Library Pinterest board

Jennifer Ryan's curator insight, February 6, 2015 6:46 AM

Records of Australian convicts are becoming much more available ... This relates to. NSW

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Primary History - Australian Curriculum Topics

Primary History - Australian Curriculum Topics | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Complete units of work, programs and lesson ideas for P-6 AC History

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, July 29, 2014 9:41 PM

Fabulous things here Maree

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and culture

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and culture | Resourcing the Curriculum K-6 | Scoop.it
Teacher resources for Australian Curriculum

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