HSIE CCS2.1: Resisting Colonisation- The Struggle of Indigenous Australians
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'The Rabbits'- Picture Book

'The Rabbits'- Picture Book | HSIE CCS2.1: Resisting Colonisation- The Struggle of Indigenous Australians | Scoop.it

"The Rabbits is partly allegorical fable about colonisation, told from the viewpoint of the colonised."

Brigitte McFadden's insight:

‘The Rabbits’ is a picture book written by John Marsden and Illustrated by Shaun Tan. It follows the story of rabbits who arrive onto land, which is at first in a friendly encounter for the native animals, but soon becomes a story of colonisation and environmental destruction, brought on by the rabbits.

Exploring the themes of colonisation and the anxiety that surrounds such an act can be a difficult one to convey to children, and this book is by no means a happy story. But pictorial illustrations are an effective way of teaching young students complex concepts (Carney & Levin, 2002), and can be used to get children thinking about issues surrounding colonisation, before they even study a real world example.  I would suggest using ‘The Rabbits’ as an opening to a discussion about British colonisation, as the imaginary, fable like story, may be easier for them to process at first.

An accompanying exercise to reading the book together, might be a worksheet or all-in discussion about how each of the creatures felt about what was happening, and how they may have felt in the same position. Getting the students to process the emotions felt by the text’s characters may help them to place the emotions felt by Indigenous peoples, when later on, introducing them to real-life examples of colonisation.

References:

Carney, R. N., & Levin, J. R. (2002). Pictorial Illustrations Still Improve Students' Learning From Text. Educational Psychology Review, 5-26.

 


 

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A shared history - Change and continuity - Stage 2 - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6

A shared history - Change and continuity - Stage 2 - Aboriginal perspectives in HSIE K-6 | HSIE CCS2.1: Resisting Colonisation- The Struggle of Indigenous Australians | Scoop.it

"It is important for teachers to understand the connections between the Land and Aboriginality. With understanding of the connections of peoples and Land comes a realisation that in our shared history, changes were forced on Aboriginal people. These changes shattered the structures of each society and ignored the sovereignty of all Aboriginal nations."

Brigitte McFadden's insight:

This is a fantastic curriculum support for Indigenous studies provided by the NSW Government. It lists the entire HSIE curriculum and has outlines and ideas for lessons for each outcome and content point. One idea that it lists is for the students to research “one significant Aboriginal person, organisation or massacre site” ( State of New South Wales through the Department of Education and Training, 2008). The way the students could conduct this research could be done through a variety of texts, including books, second hand recount after a visit of an Indigenous person to give a talk, or via supervised online research in a computer lab. They could then present their findings in poster form, including images, maps and timelines in their presentation of the poster to the class. A list of topics/people would be provided and they could choose one they liked. This could also be a group work exercise. Not only would this exercise get them researching a significant moment or person in Aboriginal history, but it will also get them working with others and public speaking.

Additionally, it’s important to note that this would not be enough of an exercise to properly study this dot point. It would be necessary to also have other activities planned; particularly ones that get the students to put themselves in the position of Aboriginal people, and explore the emotions attached to an activity such as colonisation.

References:
State of New South Wales through the Department of Education and Training. (2008). A Shared History. Retrieved April 12, 2014, from Change and Continuity: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/shared/stwochange.htm

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National Museum of Australia - Resistance

National Museum of Australia - Resistance | HSIE CCS2.1: Resisting Colonisation- The Struggle of Indigenous Australians | Scoop.it

"The lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples were profoundly changed by the arrival of British colonists in 1788. Lives were lost and land taken as the colonisers attempted to impose new social, economic and religious orders. New animals, plants and diseases were introduced.

Indigenous people responded in a variety of ways. Some fought back with weapons. Others developed different strategies to survive this new and hostile presence. Here we present four of these stories."

Brigitte McFadden's insight:

The National Museum of Australia curates a number of difference exhibitions, both online at physical, including this one about resistance to British colonisation by Aboriginal people. On this webpage, it provides in depth knowledge of four case studies; “Yagan, Fanny Balbuk, Bilin Bilin and The Coniston Massacre’, all key people or events in the Aboriginal resistance. Along with the webpage, it provides a highly visually appealing worksheet*** with sections on each of the case studies. One activity includes “What do you do?”, a table to fill out about actions YOU may take in a similar situation, and the advantages and disadvantages of taking each action. It then goes on to explore each of the specific case studies.

I think this is an excellent resource for teachers to use as a lesson planning guide, but also a great resource for kids that might be doing online research on the topic of Indigenous resistance to colonisation. Some of the activities may be too mature for Stage 2 students, but none are frightening, merely too hard to understand, and therefore, better used with a teacher.

Ultimately, it is important that students explore case studies of specific events and people important to the struggle of Aboriginal peoples. By hearing these examples and the detail contained in them, they receive a more balanced picture of the effects of colonisation. 

References:

***National Museum of Australia and Ryebuck Media. (2008). How did Aboriginal Australians resist British colonisation? Retrieved April 12, 2014, from National Museum of Australia- Resistance: http://www.nma.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0007/18997/Aboriginal_resist_colonisation_colour_Oct2012.pdf

 

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Assimilating the Natives in the U.S. and Australia

Assimilating the Natives in the U.S. and Australia | HSIE CCS2.1: Resisting Colonisation- The Struggle of Indigenous Australians | Scoop.it

"The origins of the American and Australian colonies have a common European heritage of imperialism and racial ideologies."- Gary Foley

Brigitte McFadden's insight:

Written by Gary Foley, ‘Assimilating the Natives” is a discussion and comparison between colonisation of Aboriginal land in Australia, and Native American land in the United States. At the end of the essay, Foley concludes that despite the fact that the U.S. employed slavery as a widely used tactic to ‘keep Indigenes inline’; both countries Indigenous peoples have been treated in a similar way, in both the past and the present.

This essay is a fantastic resource for exploring the global links that exist between colonised populations and the common threads these Indigenous peoples have in their struggle for sovereignty and justice. This essay would be useful for teachers who are trying to bring a global perspective to their studies of Aboriginal resistance to colonisation. While not directly useful as a teaching resource, it is useful for introducing teachers to some of the common threads in colonisation and the system of colonisation that scars global history. A potential lesson idea is watching a short film on Australian Aborigines and colonisation (via http://www.sbs.com.au/firstaustralians/about) and then watching one about Native Americans and colonisation, and then discussing the experiences of both peoples, and maybe getting students to go away and write a letter to the Indigenous peoples of either country, outlining how they feel about what happened. Then they could present them to the class.

Overall, It’s important to teach a global perspective on colonisation, so that a children are able to crystallise and situate their knowledge for an Australian Aboriginal context. It also brings an element of world history and interconnection to the, not singular, phenomenon of colonisation in Australia and around the world.

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THE MYTH OF TERRA NULLIUS 1770–1825

Brigitte McFadden's insight:

This is a visual timeline map provided by the NSW Board of Studies. It outlines some important events between 1770-1825 from an Aboriginal perspective, including significant moments in Pemulwuy and Windradyne’s lives and their resistance against British colonisers. Because it is so visual, it would make a really great poster for the classroom. Accompanying any viewing of the poster, it would be  useful to do some activities that go into more detail about the life span of Australia and its First People’s. One such activity could include: drawing chalk line on the floor, explaining that it represented the 80,000 year history of Australia and Aboriginal people, and then marking the point at which British settlers arrived. The stark contrast in line size (it’s only been 200 years since British colonisation) will be a physical and hands on eye opener for children who struggle to conceptualise large timeframes. Additionally, it would also be useful to exhibit and hang an Aboriginal language map up in the classroom, and do some activities to discuss the local Aboriginal area. Getting an Aboriginal Elder to come to the class and give a talk about their language and history would also be a great way for kids to interact with Indigenous peoples and ask them questions.

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