Resistance:French Resistance
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The Museum of National Resistance, France

The Museum of National Resistance, France | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
A museum near Paris looks at France's stealth fighters.
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Steve Banas's comment, December 18, 2012 12:06 PM
This website is for the Museum of National Resistance in France. It has a brief history of the French Resistance and it talks about how the Resistance worked during World War 2. I like this source because it relates to my book in many ways. It shows the reality of the Resistance movement by showing artifacts and antiques from those days. They have lots of information on the times and exhibits that show first hand accounts of the occupation of France and how people in the resistance movement dealt with it.
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Rèsistance

Rèsistance | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
Steve Banas's insight:

Humbert, Agnes. Resistance. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print. In Resistance,

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Steve Banas's comment, December 17, 2012 8:59 AM
Agnes Humbert is a French librarian who writes various things on her typewriter. When the Nazis invaded France and took over Paris, Agnes and a group of her friends got together and decided to make a secret alliance of people who would oppose the Nazis behind their lines. They decided to have a newspaper to recruit more people and they recruited Agnes to type up the newspaper, which they named Resistance. This goes on for a few months until Agnes is caught and interrogated by a pair of Nazi officers. She is thrown into prison for not cooperating and denying knowing anything about the resistance movement. When her trial comes up, it is unfair and they sentence her to 5 years hard labor for being a collaborater with the resistance. She spends her years in multiple different prisons, some more harsh than others with the labor they have to do. In one prison the prisoners have to work with machines that run on a certain type of acid with bare hands and no eye protection. Many prisoners become blinded by it and their hands are basically gone because of the acid. After 3 years of captivity Agnes and the other prisoners are liberated by Americans coming through the town. She meets a good soldier that she names St George because he acts like a saint to her. She helps the Americans in Germany for a while before she gets on a jeep with her friends from her past that survived their prisons and goes back to Paris with them.
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French Resistance Movement

French Resistance Movement | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
Gale World History In Context
Steve Banas's insight:

Lerner, Adrienne Wilmoth. "French Underground during World War II, Communication
     and Codes.

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Steve Banas's comment, December 14, 2012 12:18 PM
This Article talks about how the resistance movement in France during World War 2 evolved to be a formidable force against the Nazi regime. It talks about the first kinds of resistance that took place in France. The article explains how the resistance command structure was organized during the war, in a pyramid form. It also talks about the underground railroad system they used during the war to supply them and also for transportation to other parts of the country. The French Resistance scored many key victories over the Germans during the war according the the article. Many Resistance members were arrested by the Gestapo, as many as 25,000 during the course of the war. These prisoners were sent to Nazi hard labor camps or even concentration camps for their participation in the Resistance movement.
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Secrets of War: The French Resistance (Documentary)

Nazi Germanys invasion of France inflicted humiliation on the French. Risking torture and death, brave individuals took it upon themselves to reclaim the honor of their country and carried on a secret, merciless guerrilla campaign.
Steve Banas's insight:

Test, dir. Secrets of the War, French Resistance. Hulu. N.p., n.d. Web. 7 Dec.
     2012.

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Steve Banas's comment, December 14, 2012 11:54 AM
This Documentary was about the French Resistance during World War 2. When Hitler and his armies invaded France and captured Paris less than a month later, French people were already uprising against his regime. Initially small groups of rebels got together and created small disturbances, but nothing of great significance to stopping the Nazi advance. After the groups started to get more organized, larger, more powerful groups emerged in and around Paris, and also in southern France. The groups were still vastly outgunned and couldnt do much to stop the Nazis from taking complete control of the country. When French resistance groups started publishing newspapers, many more people joined the cause. Initially only 1 in 10 men were ready to oppose the Nazis, but after a year, resistance members were coming from all corners of the country. They created larger disturbances in big cities, blowing up stores and things that were Nazi headquarters. The resistance played a major part in the success of the allied invasion of France on D Day. They sabotaged German rail lines and bridges, making it harder for them to get supplies to the front.
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Nazi Prison and Concentration Camps.

Nazi Prison and Concentration Camps. | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
Report from the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer: Full Extent of Nazi Prison Camp System Still Emerging : Scholars are still discovering the full scale of the Nazi prison camp system during WWII as President Obama visited remembrances and anniversary...
Steve Banas's insight:

"Social Customs in France." Just Landed. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2012.

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Steve Banas's comment, December 14, 2012 12:05 PM
The article called "The Full Extent of Nazi Prison Camp System Still Emerging" is about how there was a vast network of Nazi prison camps all around German occupied Europe. There were also many subcamps of each larger cocentration camp. These subcamps were used as holding areas for people that were being processed to go into the main concentration camp, POW camps for captured soldiers, and smaller prisons for people that broke laws but were not Jewish or any other race that was fit to go into the concentration camp. For children that were deemed worthy to be part of the Aryian race, Germanization camps were used. The camps were also known as blood donation camps.
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The Resistance, Connection to Resistance by Agnes Humbert

The Resistance, Connection to Resistance by Agnes Humbert | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
A gripping and insightful history of the French Resistance and the men and women who opposed Nazi occupation during World War II Based on personal stories, eyewitness accounts, and archival material, this vivid history goes behind the tales...
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Steve Banas's comment, December 17, 2012 11:53 AM
This book connects to the book I read because it is about the French Resistance during World War 2. The book mentions the fall of France in 1940 and how the Resistance started up right after under. I could read this book because it is very similar to the story of Agnes Humbert. It features first hand accounts of the war by Resistance fighters, just like in the other book. The struggle against the Nazis is prevalent in both books.
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Nazi Occupation of Europe

Nazi Occupation of Europe | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
Gale World History In Context
Steve Banas's insight:

"Europe under Occupation." World War II Reference Library. N.p.: n.p., n.d. N.
     pag. Gale World History in Context. Web. 12 Dec. 2012.

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Steve Banas's comment, December 14, 2012 12:21 PM
This document explains the German occupation of France and other countries in Europe during WWII. It talks about the Polish occupation and also of France and Russia. The French were used for hard labor and they had to pay the Germans lots of money just because they demanded it. Germany's long term goal in eastern Europe was the permanent destruction of the nations it conquered. They wanted to make the countries they occupied permanently stop thinking about the possibility of revolt or revolution against them, by crushing the countries morale and taking away all forms of their independence. It also talks about how the Germans dealt with the resistance groups in each of the countries.
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The Organization of the Nazi Party

The Organization of the Nazi Party | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
Gale World History In Context
Steve Banas's insight:

"Nazi Party." Learning about the Holocaust. N.p.: n.p., n.d. N. pag. Gale World
     History in Context. Web. 10 Dec. 2012.

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Steve Banas's comment, December 14, 2012 12:16 PM
This article is about the Nazi party and how it worked in Germany during the mid to late 1930's and the early to mid 1940's. It explains how the party's power system worked. At the top stood Hitler, their Fuhrer. Then came the next 18 highest ranking party officials. Finally, then came the next 32 officials. Under them was all of the Nazi soldiers and SS soldiers who were part of the party themselves. The Nazi party segregated against many different types of individuals. Most commonly it was the Jews, but they segregated against the Polish, the French, many other European nations other than Germany, Gypsys, homosexuals, and disabled people. They put French and Polish people into hard labor camps or even executed them just because they suspected that person was part of the resistance somehow.
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French Culture During World War 2

French Culture During World War 2 | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
France: Social customs in France, Traditions and habits, All countries have peculiar social customs and.
Steve Banas's insight:

"Social Customs in France." Just Landed. N.p., n.d. Web. 10 Dec. 2012

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Steve Banas's comment, December 14, 2012 11:56 AM
This article is about French social traditions. It talks about social customs such as kissing, how to adress people, what to give as gifts, how to talk to strangers, and how to eat and drink in France. Kissing is very common in France, and is usually done on the upper cheek twice. Those are friendly kisses. It says the French love heated and loud discussions. They should be detailed and you should have facts to back up your points. Eating and drinking are also very traditional. You should never pour your own drinks if you are going to a guests house and all French people say bon appetit before a meal is started. The French talk with their hands, like Italians. When you are introduced to a French person you should say bonjeur sir or madame.
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French Underground Resistance

French Underground Resistance | Resistance:French Resistance | Scoop.it
Describing the French Resistance against the German occupation during World War 2
Steve Banas's insight:

Lerner, Adrienne Wilmoth. "French Underground during World War II, Communication
     and Codes." Encyclopedia of Espionage, Intelligence and Security. N.p.:
     n.p., n.d. N. pag. Gale World History in Context. Web. 6 Dec. 2012.

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Steve Banas's comment, December 14, 2012 12:06 PM
This Article talks about how the resistance movement in France during World War 2 evolved to be a formidable force against the Nazi regime. It talks about the first kinds of resistance that took place in France. The article explains how the resistance command structure was organized during the war, in a pyramid form. It also talks about the underground railroad system they used during the war to supply them and also for transportation to other parts of the country. The French Resistance scored many key victories over the Germans during the war according the the article. Many Resistance members were arrested by the Gestapo, as many as 25,000 during the course of the war. These prisoners were sent to Nazi hard labor camps or even concentration camps for their participation in the Resistance movement.