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Research Workshop
Personal space for my research projects. Applying science to social policy. Understanding evidence. Academic sources and scientists.
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Swirling electrons in the whirlpool galaxy

Swirling electrons in the whirlpool galaxy | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
The whirlpool galaxy Messier 51 (M51) is seen from a distance of approximately 30 million light years. This galaxy appears almost face-on and displays a beautiful system of spiral arms.
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Neanderthals and humans had 'ample time' to mix

Neanderthals and humans had 'ample time' to mix | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Humans and Neanderthals may have coexisted in Europe for more than 5,000 years, providing ample time for the two species to meet and mix, according to new research.
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500 million year reset for immune system

500 million year reset for immune system | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
A single factor can reset the immune system of mice to a state likely similar to what it was 500 million years ago, when the first vertebrates emerged.
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Microchip reveals how tumor cells transition to invasion

Microchip reveals how tumor cells transition to invasion | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Using a microengineered device that acts as an obstacle course for cells, researchers have shed new light on a cellular metamorphosis thought to play a role in tumor cell invasion throughout the body.
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A shift in the code: New method reveals hidden genetic landscape

A shift in the code: New method reveals hidden genetic landscape | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
With three billion letters in the human genome, it seems hard to believe that adding a DNA base here or removing a DNA base there could have much of an effect on our health.
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New weapon of the immune system discovered

New weapon of the immune system discovered | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Max Planck researchers have discovered a completely new way in which the immune system recognizes pathogens. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor has long been a focus of research for pharma-cologists and toxicologists, as it recognizes environmental toxins. However, it also plays an important role in the ...
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Plants may use newly discovered molecular language to communicate

Plants may use newly discovered molecular language to communicate | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
A scientist has discovered a potentially new form of plant communication, one that allows them to share an extraordinary amount of genetic information with one another.
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Genetic signal prevents immune cells from turning against the body

Genetic signal prevents immune cells from turning against the body | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
When faced with pathogens, the immune system summons a swarm of cells made up of soldiers and peacekeepers. The peacekeeping cells tell the soldier cells to halt fighting when invaders are cleared.
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New blood: Tracing the beginnings of hematopoietic stem cells

New blood: Tracing the beginnings of hematopoietic stem cells | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) give rise to all other blood cell types, but their development and how their fate is determined has long remained a mystery.
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Laser makes microscopes way cooler, incredibly sensitive

Laser makes microscopes way cooler, incredibly sensitive | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Laser physicists have found a way to make atomic-force microscope probes 20 times more sensitive and capable of detecting forces as small as the weight of an individual virus.
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Possible extended symmetries of field theoretic systems

Possible extended symmetries of field theoretic systems | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Many physical systems, from superfluids to pi mesons, are understood to be manifestations of spontaneous symmetry breaking, whereby the symmetries of a system are not realized by its lowest energy state.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Papers
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A method for building self-folding machines

Origami can turn a sheet of paper into complex three-dimensional shapes, and similar folding techniques can produce structures and mechanisms. To demonstrate the application of these techniques to the fabrication of machines, we developed a crawling robot that folds itself. The robot starts as a flat sheet with embedded electronics, and transforms autonomously into a functional machine. To accomplish this, we developed shape-memory composites that fold themselves along embedded hinges. We used these composites to recreate fundamental folded patterns, derived from computational origami, that can be extrapolated to a wide range of geometries and mechanisms. This origami-inspired robot can fold itself in 4 minutes and walk away without human intervention, demonstrating the potential both for complex self-folding machines and autonomous, self-controlled assembly.


A method for building self-folding machines
S. Felton, M. Tolley, E. Demaine, D. Rus, R. Wood

Science 8 August 2014:
Vol. 345 no. 6197 pp. 644-646
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1252610


Via Complexity Digest
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Four Ways to Think About Using ThingLink - Rethinking ThingLink

Four Ways to Think About Using ThingLink - Rethinking ThingLink | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

"Thinglink is a powerful tool, and some new uses are making it even more compelling. Beyond creating pictures with links, images, and videos, a “next level” exists that turns ThingLink into a powerful organizer, aggregation tool, and curator."


Via Beth Dichter
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Quran Coaching's curator insight, August 14, 12:55 PM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

Rebekah Lee's curator insight, August 15, 12:29 AM

A pretty nifty way to insert signposts on a screenshot to display  pop up instructions

W. Bradley Gooderham's curator insight, August 15, 10:45 AM

Whoa, just whoa.   ThingLink is so cool and what a great way to densify creative products and engage a diversity of learning pathways!    I am going to include this in my next resume for sure.

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Jurassic Welsh mammals were picky eaters, study finds

Jurassic Welsh mammals were picky eaters, study finds | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
For most people, mere mention of the word Jurassic conjures up images of huge dinosaurs chomping their way through lush vegetation – and each other.
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Top 5 Content Curation Tools for Organizing Web Content

Top 5 Content Curation Tools for Organizing Web Content | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

To curate content, means to put everything in one tiny a compact list of content that is not only appealing to the eyes, but also informative and strictly stays on the topic. We’ve got plenty of content curation tools become available to us in the past couple of years.


Via Karen Bonanno
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These eight whiz kids are the future of medicine

These eight whiz kids are the future of medicine | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

"A 10-year-old inventor and a 20-year-old MD? Meet the whiz kids changing the face of medicine ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
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8,000-year-old mutation key to human life at high altitudes

8,000-year-old mutation key to human life at high altitudes | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
In an environment where others struggle to survive, Tibetans thrive in the thin air on the Tibetan Plateau, with an average elevation of 14,800 feet.
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Fascinating rhythm: Light pulses illuminate a rare black hole

Fascinating rhythm: Light pulses illuminate a rare black hole | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

The universe has so many black holes that it's impossible to count them all. There may be 100 million of these intriguing astral objects in our galaxy alone. Nearly all black holes fall into one of two classes: big, and colossal. Astronomers know that black holes ranging from about 10 times to 100 times the mass of our sun are the remnants of dying stars, and that supermassive black holes, more than a million times the mass of the sun, inhabit the centers of most galaxies.


But scattered across the universe like oases in a desert are a few apparent black holes of a more mysterious type. Ranging from a hundred times to a few hundred thousand times the sun's mass, these intermediate-mass black holes are so hard to measure that even their existence is sometimes disputed. Little is known about how they form. And some astronomers question whether they behave like other black holes.


Now a team of astronomers has accurately measured—and thus confirmed the existence of—a black hole about 400 times the mass of our sun in a galaxy 12 million light years from Earth. The finding, by University of Maryland astronomy graduate student Dheeraj Pasham and two colleagues, was published online August 17 in the journal Nature.



Pasham focused on one object in Messier 82, a galaxy in the constellation Ursa Major. Messier 82 is our closest "starburst galaxy," where young stars are forming. Beginning in 1999 a NASA satellite telescope, the Chandra X-ray Observatory, detected X-rays in Messier 82 from a bright object prosaically dubbed M82 X-1. Astronomers, including Mushotzky and co-author Tod Strohmayer of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, suspected for about a decade that the object was an intermediate-mass black hole, but estimates of its mass were not definitive enough to confirm that.



Between 2004 and 2010 NASA's Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite telescope observed M82 X-1 about 800 times, recording individual x-ray particles emitted by the object. Pasham mapped the intensity and wavelength of x-rays in each sequence, then stitched the sequences together and analyzed the result

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Among the material circling the suspected black hole, he spotted two repeating flares of light. The flares showed a rhythmic pattern of light pulses, one occurring 5.1 times per second and the other 3.3 times per second – or a ratio of 3:2.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Interspecies RNA Shuffle - Scientist

Interspecies RNA Shuffle - Scientist | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

Researchers report the first example of large-scale RNA-based communication between species—a parasitic plant and two of its hosts. By Anna Azvolinsky | August 14, 2014.

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Dark bands in starlight: New Milky Way maps help solve stubborn interstellar material mystery

Dark bands in starlight: New Milky Way maps help solve stubborn interstellar material mystery | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
An international team of sky scholars has produced new maps of the material located between the stars in the Milky Way. The results should move astronomers closer to cracking a stardust puzzle that has vexed them for nearly a century.
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Antibodies, together with viral 'inducers,' found to control HIV in mice

Antibodies, together with viral 'inducers,' found to control HIV in mice | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Although HIV can now be effectively suppressed using anti-retroviral drugs, it still comes surging back the moment the flow of drugs is stopped.
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New X-ray imaging developed by scientists

New X-ray imaging developed by scientists | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed an x-ray imaging system that enables researchers to see 'live' how effective treatments are for cystic fibrosis.
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Molecular Engineers Record an Electron's Quantum Behavior

Molecular Engineers Record an Electron's Quantum Behavior | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
A team of researchers led by the University of Chicago has developed a technique to record the quantum mechanical behavior of an individual electron contained within a nanoscale defect in diamond.
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Key mechanism that drives movement in living cells discovered

Key mechanism that drives movement in living cells discovered | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Living cell migration is regulated by the engagement of a force transmitter composed of vinculin and talin, two types of cytoskeletal protein, researchers have discovered.
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NASA: Jupiter's Great Red Spot is Rapidly Shrinking

NASA: Jupiter's Great Red Spot is Rapidly Shrinking | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

New observations from the Hubble Space Telescope confirm that Jupiter's Great Red Spot is rapidly shrinking. The behemoth storm is now at its smallest size ever measured. According to Amy Simon of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, recent NASA Hubble Space Telescope observations confirm the Great Red Spot now is approximately 10,250 miles across, less than half the size of some historical measurements. Astronomers have followed this downsizing since the 1930s.


Historic observations as far back as the late 1800s gauged the storm to be as large as 25,500 miles on its long axis.  NASA Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 flybys of Jupiter in 1979 measured it to be 14,500 miles across. In 1995, a Hubble photo showed the long axis of the spot at an estimated 13,020 miles across. And in a 2009 photo, it was measured at 11,130 miles across. Beginning in 2012, amateur observations revealed a noticeable increase in the rate at which the spot is shrinking -- by 580 miles per year -- changing its shape from an oval to a circle.


"In our new observations it is apparent very small eddies are feeding into the storm," said Simon. "We hypothesized these may be responsible for the accelerated change by altering the internal dynamics and energy of the Great Red Spot."


Simon's team plans to study the motions of the small eddies and the internal dynamics of the storm to determine whether these eddies can feed or sap momentum entering the upwelling vortex, resulting in this yet unexplained shrinkage.


NASA's Juno spacecraft is hurtling toward Jupiter now, due to reach the giant planet in July 2016.  Point-blank examination by Juno's instruments will undoubtedly help unravel the mystery.



Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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