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Research Workshop
Advances and breakthroughs in many scientific fields. Applying science to social policy. Understanding evidence. Academic sources and scientists.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Cancer Immunotherapy Review
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ASCO '15: Merck, Bristol Drugs Boost Immune System to Kill Broad Swath of Cancer Types

ASCO '15: Merck, Bristol Drugs Boost Immune System to Kill Broad Swath of Cancer Types | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
The class of cancer immunotherapy drugs which target the protein PD-1 is proving to be effective against advanced liver, head and neck, lung and colon cancers.

 

Merck's Keytruda demonstrated a 62% tumor shrinkage in patients with advanced colon cancer containing a newly discovered genetic biomarker.The tumor response rate to Bristol's Opdivo in patients with advanced liver cancer was 19%. The overall survival rate at 12 months was 62%. While early, the results suggest Opdivo may have a role to play in the treatment of the disease where only a single targeted drug has proven effective.In a study of patients with head and neck cancer, Merck's Keytruda demonstrated a tumor response rate of 25%, or more than double the response typically seen with Eli Lilly's Erbitux.In the only randomized study discussed Friday enrolling patients with advanced, non-squamous, non-small cell lung cancer (the most common form of lung cancer) treatment with Bristol's Opdivo led to a 27% reduction in the risk of death compared to a placebo. Patients with tumors expressing high levels of the protein PD-1 lived even longer.


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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, May 29, 3:20 PM

Adam Feuerstein

 

Bristol's Opdivo shrunk liver cancer in eight of 42 patients evaluable in a phase I study. The 19% objective response rate was especially encouraging because three-quarters of the patients enrolled in the study had liver cancer progressing despite previous treatments. Nearly 70% of the patients were treated previously withAmgen's (AMGN) Nexavar -- the only targeted drug approved currently for liver cancer.

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Team invents microscopic sonic screwdriver

Team invents microscopic sonic screwdriver | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
A team of engineers have created tiny acoustic vortices and used them to grip and spin microscopic particles suspended in water.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
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New electronic stent could provide feedback and therapy—then dissolve

New electronic stent could provide feedback and therapy—then dissolve | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Every year, an estimated half-million Americans undergo surgery to have a stent prop open a coronary artery narrowed by plaque. But sometimes the mesh tubes get clogged. Scientists report in the journal ACS Nano a new kind of multi-tasking stent that could minimize the risks associated with the procedure. It can sense blood flow and temperature, store and transmit the information for analysis and can be absorbed by the body after it finishes its job.


Doctors have been implanting stents to unblock coronary arteries for 30 years. During that time, the devices have evolved from bare metal, mesh tubes to coated stents that can release drugs to prevent reclogging. But even these are associated with health risks. So researchers have been working on versions that the body can absorb to minimize the risk that a blood clot will form. And now Dae-Hyeong Kim, Seung Hong Choi, Taeghwan Hyeon and colleagues are taking that idea a step further.


The researchers developed and tested in animals a drug-releasing electronic stent that can provide diagnostic feedback by measuring blood flow, which slows when an artery starts narrowing. The device can also heat up on command to speed up drug delivery, and it can dissolve once it's no longer needed.


More information: Bioresorbable Electronic Stent Integrated with Therapeutic Nanoparticles for Endovascular Diseases Bioresorbable Electronic Stent Integrated with Therapeutic Nanoparticles for Endovascular Diseases, ACS Nano, Article ASAP. DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.5b00651


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from DNA & RNA Research
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Pitt Team IDs Two New and Very Large Classes of RNAs Linked to an Important Cancer Biomarker

Pitt Team IDs Two New and Very Large Classes of RNAs Linked to an Important Cancer Biomarker | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have identified two new classes of RNAs that are closely associated with a protein known to be a prognostic biomarker for breast cancer and could play a role in progression of prostate cancer. Their findings were published in the June issue of the scientific journal RNA.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Bioinformatics Software: Sequence Analysis
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Mapping the Space of Genomic Signatures

Mapping the Space of Genomic Signatures | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
We propose a computational method to measure and visualize interrelationships among any number of DNA sequences allowing, for example, the examination of hundreds or thousands of complete mitochondrial genomes. An "image distance" is computed for each pair of graphical representations of DNA sequences, and the distances are visualized as a Molecular Distance Map: Each point on the map represents a DNA sequence, and the spatial proximity between any two points reflects the degree of structural s

Via Mel Melendrez-Vallard
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Tools and tips for scientific tinkers and tailors
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Scientists Map 5,000 New Ocean Viruses | Quanta Magazine

Scientists Map 5,000 New Ocean Viruses |  Quanta Magazine | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
In the few decades since viruses were first found in the oceans, scientists have only been able to identify a handful of species. A new survey has uncovered

Via Mel Melendrez-Vallard
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Shedding light on untapped information in photons

Shedding light on untapped information in photons | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Conventional optical imaging systems today largely limit themselves to the measurement of light intensity, providing two-dimensional renderings of three-dimensional scenes and ignoring significant amounts of additional information that may be...
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Complex signaling between blood and stem cells controls regeneration in fly gut

Complex signaling between blood and stem cells controls regeneration in fly gut | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Having a healthy gut may well depend on maintaining a complex signaling dance between immune cells and the stem cells that line the intestine.
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Engineering phase changes in nanoparticle arrays

Engineering phase changes in nanoparticle arrays | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have just taken a big step toward the goal of engineering dynamic nanomaterials whose structure and associated properties can be switched on demand.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Gavagai
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Nasa spacecraft finds the brightest galaxy in known universe

Nasa spacecraft finds the brightest galaxy in known universe | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

Nasa's WISE spacecraft has discovered the brightest galaxy in the known universe. It shines with the light of 300 trillion Suns.


Via Luca Baptista
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John Nash's unique approach produced quantum leaps in economics and maths

John Nash's unique approach produced quantum leaps in economics and maths | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Having solved some of the great theoretical problems and battled mental illness, the remarkable mathematician’s death in a car accident seems all the more tragic The American mathematician John Nash, who was killed on Saturday night in a car crash,...
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Top Selling Monoclonal Antibodies 2014
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Antibody-Drug Conjugates: Design, Formulation and Physicochemical Stability - Online First - Springer

Antibody-Drug Conjugates: Design, Formulation and Physicochemical Stability - Online First - Springer | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

Abstract

The convergence of advanced understanding of biology with chemistry has led to a resurgence in the development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), especially with two recent product approvals. Design and development of ADCs requires the synergistic combination of the monoclonal antibody, the linker and the payload. Advances in antibody science has enabled identification and generation of high affinity, highly selective, humanized or human antibodies for a given target. Novel linker technologies have been synthesized and highly potent cytotoxic drug payloads have been created. As the first generation of ADCs utilizing lysine and cysteine chemistries moves through the clinic and into commercialization, second generation ADCs involving site specific conjugation technologies are being evaluated and tested. The latter aim to be better characterized and controlled, with wider therapeutic indices as well as improved pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) profiles. ADCs offer some interesting physicochemical properties, due to conjugation itself, and to the (often) hydrophobic payloads that must be considered during their CMC development. New analytical methodologies are required for the ADCs, supplementing those used for the antibody itself. Regulatory filings will be a combination of small molecule and biologics. The regulators have put forth some broad principles but this landscape is still evolving.


Via Krishan Maggon
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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, May 24, 1:57 AM
Pharmaceutical ResearchMay 2015Date: 19 May 2015Antibody-Drug Conjugates: Design, Formulation and Physicochemical StabilitySatish K. Singh, Donna L. Luisi, Roger H. Pak
Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Amazing Science
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Google Tests First Error Correction in Quantum Computing

Google Tests First Error Correction in Quantum Computing | Research Workshop | Scoop.it

Quantum computers won’t ever outperform today’s classical computers unless they can correct for errors that disrupt the fragile quantum states of their qubits. A team at Google has taken the next huge step toward making quantum computing practical by demonstrating the first system capable of correcting such errors.


Google’s breakthrough originated with the hiring of a quantum computing research group from the University California, Santa Barbara in the autumn of 2014. The UCSB researchers had previously built a system of superconducting quantum circuits that performed with enough accuracy tomake error correction a possibility. That earlier achievement paved the way for the researchers—many now employed at Google—to build a system that can correct the errors that naturally arise during quantum computing operations. Their work is detailed in the 4 March 2015 issue of the journal Nature.


“This is the first time natural errors arising from the qubit environment were corrected,” said Rami Barends, a quantum electronics engineer at Google. “It’s the first device that can correct its own errors.”


Quantum computers have the potential to perform many simultaneous calculations by relying upon quantum bits, or qubits, that can represent information as both 1 and 0 at the same time. That gives quantum computing a big edge over today’s classical computers that rely on bits that can only represent either 1 or 0.


But a huge challenge in building practical quantum computers involves preserving the fragile quantum states of qubits long enough to run calculations. The solution that Google and UCSB have demonstrated is a quantum error-correction code that uses simple classical processing to correct the errors that arise during quantum computing operations.


Such codes can’t directly detect errors in qubits without disrupting the fragile quantum states. But they get around that problem by relying on entanglement, a physics phenomenon that enables a single qubit to share its information with many other qubits through a quantum connection. The codes exploit entanglement with an architecture that includes “measurement” qubits entangled with neighboring “data” qubits.


The Google and UCSB team has been developing a specific quantum error-correction code called “surface code.” They eventually hope to build a 2-D surface code architecture based on a checkerboard arrangement of qubits, so that “white squares” would represent the data qubits that perform operations and “black squares” would represent measurement qubits that can detect errors in neighboring qubits.


For now, the researchers have been testing the surface code in a simplified “repetition code” architecture that involves a linear, 1-D array of qubits. Their unprecedented demonstration of error correction used a repetition code architecture that included nine qubits. They tested the repetition code through the equivalent of 90,000 test runs to gather the necessary statistics about its performance.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, May 23, 2:25 AM

Quantum computers have the potential to perform many simultaneous calculations by relying upon quantum bits, or qubits, that can represent information as both 1 and 0 at the same time. That gives quantum computing a big edge over today’s classical computers that rely on bits that can only represent either 1 or 0.


But a huge challenge in building practical quantum computers involves preserving the fragile quantum states of qubits long enough to run calculations. The solution that Google and UCSB have demonstrated is a quantum error-correction code that uses simple classical processing to correct the errors that arise during quantum computing operations.

Pablo Vicente Munuera's curator insight, May 23, 4:05 AM

Quantum computers are coming... :D

Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from 21st Century Innovative Technologies and Developments as also discoveries, curiosity ( insolite)...
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Watch This Terrifying Cheetah Robot Jump Over Hurdles | Robotics

Watch This Terrifying Cheetah Robot Jump Over Hurdles | Robotics | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
WHEN YOU COMBINE robots and cheetahs with military funding, you’re bound to end up with something incredible. Robotics engineers from MIT have spent over five years developing a battery-powered quadruped robot capable of running as fast as a human being. And now they’ve trained that robot to jump over hurdles—autonomously.

In a video released today, the team from MIT shows off their DARPA-funded, four-legged harbinger of terror approaching and clearing obstacles up to 18 inches tall while maintaing an average speed of 5 mph. The 70-lb robot (roughly the same weight as a female cheetah) estimates the height, size, and distance of objects in its path, and adjusts its approach to prepare a jump and safe landing—all without slowing down.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Robotics



Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 29, 4:02 PM

WHEN YOU COMBINE robots and cheetahs with military funding, you’re bound to end up with something incredible. Robotics engineers from MIT have spent over five years developing a battery-powered quadruped robot capable of running as fast as a human being. And now they’ve trained that robot to jump over hurdles—autonomously.

In a video released today, the team from MIT shows off their DARPA-funded, four-legged harbinger of terror approaching and clearing obstacles up to 18 inches tall while maintaing an average speed of 5 mph. The 70-lb robot (roughly the same weight as a female cheetah) estimates the height, size, and distance of objects in its path, and adjusts its approach to prepare a jump and safe landing—all without slowing down.


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?tag=Robotics


Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from PARP Inhibitors Cancer Review
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Scientists identify key to preventing secondary cancers - Medical Xpress

Scientists identify key to preventing secondary cancers - Medical Xpress | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Leading scientists from the University of Sheffield and University of Copenhagen have identified a possible key to preventing secondary cancers in breast cancer patients, after discovering an enzyme which enhances the spread of the disease.

Via Krishan Maggon
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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, May 28, 12:51 AM
The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidaseThomas R. Cox,Robin M. H. Rumney,Erwin M. Schoof,Lara Perryman,Anette M. Høye,Ankita Agrawal,Demelza Bird,Norain Ab Latif,Hamish Forrest,Holly R. Evans,Iain D. Huggins,Georgina Lang,Rune Linding,Alison Gartland& Janine T. ErlerAffiliationsContributionsCorresponding authorsNature (2015) doi:10.1038/nature14492Received 10 July 2014 Accepted 23 April 2015 Published online 27 May 2015
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Preventing hydropower turbine failure

Preventing hydropower turbine failure | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
The Francis turbine is the most common type of water turbine used in Norwegian hydropower plants, and has been for many years. About half of the world's Francis turbines are found in Norwegian plants.
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Dengue and other Quasispecies-Like viruses
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Elimination of HIV-1-Infected Primary T Cell Reservoirs in an In Vitro Model of Latency

Elimination of HIV-1-Infected Primary T Cell Reservoirs in an In Vitro Model of Latency | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
by Stephen A. Rawlings, Francis Alonzo, Lina Kozhaya, Victor J. Torres, Derya Unutmaz
Establishment of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV-1 represents a major therapeutic challenge to virus eradication.

Via Mel Melendrez-Vallard
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from Bioinformatics Software: Sequence Analysis
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Dizzy-Beats: a Bayesian evidence analysis tool for systems biology

Our Dizzy-Beats paper is now out of Advanced Access & in the latest issue of #Bioinformatics: http://t.co/yEwDmkgs7Q

Via Mel Melendrez-Vallard
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How Astronomers Discovered the Universe's Hidden Light

How Astronomers Discovered the Universe's Hidden Light | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Galaxies in every corner of the universe have been sending out photons, or light particles, since nearly the beginning of time. Astronomers are now beginning to read this extragalactic background...
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Ultrasound-activated bubbles could help make cancer drugs more effective and less nasty

Ultrasound-activated bubbles could help make cancer drugs more effective and less nasty | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Despite extraordinary advances in new drugs and biotechnology, cancer is still one of the leading causes of death worldwide.
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Team finds the 'key' to quantum network solution

Team finds the 'key' to quantum network solution | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Scientists at the University of York's Centre for Quantum Technology have made an important step in establishing scalable and secure high rate quantum networks.
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Researchers first to create a single-molecule diode

Researchers first to create a single-molecule diode | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Under the direction of Latha Venkataraman, associate professor of applied physics at Columbia Engineering, researchers have designed a new technique to create a single-molecule diode, and, in doing so, they have developed molecular diodes that...
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Rescooped by Jocelyn Stoller from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Revealed: The Ocean's Tiniest Life At The Bottom Of The Food Chain

Revealed: The Ocean's Tiniest Life At The Bottom Of The Food Chain | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
The ocean's tiniest inhabitants — including bacteria, plankton, krill — are food for most everything that swims or floats. Now, scientists have completed a count of this vast and diverse hidden world.

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, May 25, 10:54 AM

YET SO SMALL BUT HELPER OF THE LARGE THAT MOST DONT EVEN KNOW ABOUT! EVEN IN THE OCEAN STREAM OF THINGS!!!

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The Trillion Fold Increase In Computing Power, Visualized

The Trillion Fold Increase In Computing Power, Visualized | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
It’s easy to get hung up over the imperfections in our technology (srsly Apple, is it that hard to give a phone a back button ?) and forget just how astounding modern processing power is.
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This Is What Happens When Two Galaxies Collide

This Is What Happens When Two Galaxies Collide | Research Workshop | Scoop.it
Four hundred million light years away, NGC 6240 appears in this image from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys.
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