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Dimenco no-glasses 3D TV offer goes live on Kickstarter

Dimenco no-glasses 3D TV offer goes live on Kickstarter | Research Tools | Scoop.it

Eindhoven, Netherlands-based Dimenco has launched a Kickstarter campaign for their glasses-free 3D TV, selling for under $1,250 via a Kickstarter campaign. The company has a manufacturing site in The Netherlands, but is ramping up manufacturing at new facilities in the Far East, targeted for this month. After test runs of their new production facility, they are to start manufacturing in August to deliver their first products in September, and the bulk in November. "Having to use 3D glasses hampers social interaction and is simply uncomfortable," they said, and they have worked to develop a TV that can improve on the viewing experience. They are a small team, with years of experience in 3D technology. Maarten Tobias, Jan van der Horst, Pieter de Jong and Bas Böggemann are the four founders of Dimenco. They worked together at a former venture of Philips that focused on 3D technology. Dimenco was founded in 2010. The Kickstarter campaign offer is a 39" glasses-free 3D TV with Full HD quality in 3D and 2D.

They said that "we can offer you a fantastic 3D experience for e.g. 3D Blu-ray, YouTube 3D and 3D games on PC or consoles. In other words, we add a new dimension to watching TV, movies and playing games." They added that "if you would still want to watch normal television, that is possible in Full HD quality."


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Novel 2-D Material Offers a Band Gap and Self Assembly

Novel 2-D Material Offers a Band Gap and Self Assembly | Research Tools | Scoop.it

The competitive field of two-dimensional materials has added another rival to graphene to its ranks. A collaboration between MIT and Harvard University researchers has yielded what observers are heralding as a major advance in the synthetic design of novel semiconducting materials. The Boston-arearesearchers have developed a new 2-D material that not only has an inherent band gap—which graphene lacks—but self-assembles, promising easier avenues to mass production.The material is a combination of nickel and an organic compound called 2,3,6,7,10,11-hexaiminotriphenylene (HITP). The resulting material belongs to a class of materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that are compounds in which metal ions are coordinated to rigid organic molecules to form a porous material that can be one-, two-, or three-dimensional.


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LHC plans for open data future

LHC plans for open data future | Research Tools | Scoop.it

When the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is humming along, the data come in a deluge. The four experimental detectors at the facility, based at CERN, Europe’s particle-physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, collect some 25 petabytes of information each year.

Storing the data is not a problem: hard drives are cheap and getting cheaper. The challenge is preserving knowledge that is less commonly stored — the software, algorithms and reference plots specific to each experiment. These often degrade or disappear with time, says Cristinel Diaconu of the Marseilles Centre for Particle Physics in France, who is chair of the international Data Preservation in Long Term Analysis in High Energy Physics (DPHEP) study group. He worries that if the data continue to be stored in their current state, physicists trying to decipher them in 10 years’ time will be unable to reconstruct the discovery of the Higgs boson. “When the LHC programme comes to an end, it will probably be the last data at this frontier for many years,” he says. “We can’t afford to lose it.”

 The DPHEP is therefore trying to push data-preservation efforts from mere storage to a system of open sharing. The thinking goes that data and the knowledge needed to interpret them are more likely to survive in the long term if many people outside an experiment are constantly trying to make sense of them.


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New method for measuring temperature of nanoscale objects discovered

New method for measuring temperature of nanoscale objects discovered | Research Tools | Scoop.it

Temperature measurements in our daily life are typically performed by bringing a thermometer in contact with the object to be measured. However, measuring the temperature of nanoscale objects is a much more tricky task due to their size - up to a thousand times smaller than the width of a human hair.

Pioneering research, published in Nature Nanotechnology, has now developed a method to accurately measure the surface temperature of nanoscale objects when they have a different temperature than their environment. A team led by Dr Janet Anders at the University of Exeter and Professor Peter Barker at University College London have discovered that the surface temperatures of nanoscale objects can be determined from analysing their jittery movement in air - known as Brownian motion.


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Harvard 3-D Prints Biological Tissue

Harvard 3-D Prints Biological Tissue | Research Tools | Scoop.it

Depite the excitement that 3-D printing has generated, its capabilities remain rather limited. It can be used to make complex shapes, but most commonly only out of plastics. Even manufacturers using an advanced version of the technology known as additive manufacturing typically have expanded the material palette only to a few types of metal alloys. But what if 3-D printers could use a wide assortment of different materials, from living cells to semiconductors, mixing and matching the “inks” with precision?

Jennifer Lewis, a materials scientist at Harvard University, is developing the chemistry and machines to make that possible. She prints intricately shaped objects from “the ground up,” precisely adding materials that are useful for their mechanical properties, electrical conductivity, or optical traits. This means 3-D printing technology could make objects that sense and respond to their environment. “Integrating form and function,” she says, “is the next big thing that needs to happen in 3-D printing.”


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It's all about data

It's all about data | Research Tools | Scoop.it
Research data comes in various forms and levels of significance. Finding the best way to share all of the results of a research project can be difficult, but new ways are constantly emerging.
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