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The world after Big Data: What the digital revolution means for us

The world after Big Data: What the digital revolution means for us | Research & Technology | Scoop.it

Never before were politicians, business leaders, and scientists more urgently needed to master the challenges ahead of us. We are in the middle of a third industrial revolution. While we see the symptoms, such as the financial and economic crisis, cybercrime and cyberwar, we haven't understood the implications well. But at the end of this socio-economic transformation, we will live in a digital society. This comes with breath-taking opportunities and challenges, as they occur only every 100 years.

 

http://futurict.blogspot.mx/2014/05/the-world-after-big-data-what-digital.html

 

See also What's the Next Big Thing after Big Data? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5Y76UB080M&list=UUYrlsSzinJN42rKmFlOOYxA


Via Complexity Digest, Ashish Umre
Rick Frank's insight:

This is a bit idealistic but I like the thought process behind it.

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Gary Bamford's curator insight, May 30, 2014 2:37 AM

Come on, keep up!

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BIG DATA IN THE HOUSE

BIG DATA IN THE HOUSE | Research & Technology | Scoop.it

In late March we dug into the archives to mine our own big data. Using only studies which we have been asked to archive or are proprietary studies and excluding a single financial services client due to their atypical work environment. Here are the results. The changing face of the survey respondent from 2003-2017.

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Why I left Mac for Windows: Apple has given up – Charged Tech

Why I left Mac for Windows: Apple has given up – Charged Tech | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
If you ask anyone who knows me, I’m probably the biggest Apple fan they know. Ask for a suggestion of what computer to get, and I’ll almost certainly either tell you the MacBook Pro, or to wait…
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Why our brains may be 100 times more powerful than believed

Why our brains may be 100 times more powerful than believed | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
A new study out of the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) has found that one part of the neurons in our brains is more active than previously revealed. The finding implies that our brains are both analog and digital computers and could lead to better ways to treat neurological disorders.

The focus of the study was the dendrites, long branch-like structures that attach to a roundish body called the soma to form neurons. It was previously believed that dendrites were nothing more than conduits that sent spikes of electrical activity generated in the soma to other neurons. But the study has shown that the dendrites themselves are highly active, sending spikes of their own at a rate 10 times that previously believed.

The finding runs counter to the long-held belief that somatic spikes were the main way we learn and form memories and perceptions.

"Dendrites make up more than 90 percent of neural tissue," said UCLA neurophysicist Mayank Mehta, the study's senior author. "Knowing they are much more active than the soma fundamentally changes the nature of our understanding of how the brain computes information. It may pave the way for understanding and treating neurological disorders, and for developing brain-like computers."

Via Wildcat2030
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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, March 14, 1:24 AM

Fascinating implications for neurological research and medical treatment. Apparently, our brains can function as both analog and digital computers, setting the stage for the eventual union of human intelligence with Artificial Intelligence.  Welcome to the age of the Cyborg.

Russell Roberts

Hawaii Intelligence Digest

Allan Whitworth's curator insight, March 15, 3:20 AM
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carptag's comment, March 15, 5:20 AM
Nice....
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The roots of technological singularity can be traced backed to the Stone Age

The roots of technological singularity can be traced backed to the Stone Age | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Four thousand years BCE in the ancient Near East, a region we have come to describe as the cradle of civilisation, Sumerian scribes made replicas of their minds in mud and created the clay tablet - the world's first silicate chip.

Five thousand years later, silicon semiconductors, ferromagnetic films and floating gate transistors have amplified the recording power of clay a quintillion times. Trends in processing and storage technology suggest to futurists that before too long, human thought, as the Babylonian mythology Enûma Eliš described so presciently, "shall be bound" and "to a unity brought together".

The technological singularity - that moment when humanity is surpassed by intelligent machines and absorbed by them - was first described by the mathematician Stanislaw Ulam, as a defining moment when "the ever accelerating progress of technology" leads to a point "beyond which human affairs, as we know them, could not continue". For the engineer Ray Kurzweil, this event marks overcoming the limitations of biological brains.

There is a tendency to view one's own time as uniquely sophisticated, to conceive of the past as primitive. Yet with clay tablets, humans overcame the limitations of their brains 5,000 years ago. The first singularity took place in the Stone Age. It is only recently that we have grasped what it means for individual brains to extend into the world of culture, fuse with the thoughts of society through the properties of physical artefacts and technologies, and then reabsorb the experience of the collective by accessing these technologies.

And what we have learnt is that the evolution of human intelligence is a continuous process of alternating outsourcing and reintegration, an endless series of fusions and fissions among individuals and collectives. To make this organic-inorganic narrative clear, let's consider numbers.

In the western world, we have grown complacent about our Indian-Arabic number system. These numbers possess both a zero and a place-based value. One might assume that previous number systems were less able and that our decimal numerals are a late and highly evolved means of representing magnitude and relation. This is far from the case. The two earliest number systems were Egyptian and Sumerian. The ancient Egyptian numbers were also base ten, and each power of ten was represented by a different hieroglyph - from strokes (one), to cattle (ten), ropes (100), and lotus flowers (1,000). The Sumerians used base 60, written in cuneiform characters, one for units and one for powers of ten. A legacy of the sexagesimal base persists in our units of time - 60 seconds to the minute and 60 minutes to the hour. Cultures are swimming in unfamiliar number systems: base 27 among the Oksapmin people of New Guinea; base 20 among the Yoruba of West Africa; and base 12 among the Nimbi of Nigeria.

Via Wildcat2030
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prgnewshawaii's curator insight, February 23, 12:36 AM

A fascinating account of "technological singularity"--something that can be traced by to our stone age ancestors.  We were inquisitive creatures from our earliest beginnings.

Russell Roberts

Hawaii Intelligence Digest

https://hawaiiintelligencedigest.com

https://paper.li/f-1482109921

corrugatedboard's curator insight, February 25, 3:12 AM

NC Sheetcutter Packaging Machine

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Policy making manifesto: squaring science with the human factor

Policy making manifesto: squaring science with the human factor | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
EuroScientist publishes in exclusivity the Brussels Declaration, launched on 17th February 2017 at the AAAS meeting.
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From Research to Reward: The Acid Rain Economy: How the Free Market Tackled an Environmental Challenge

From Research to Reward: The Acid Rain Economy: How the Free Market Tackled an Environmental Challenge | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
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The self-sufficient toilet could be on its way powered by urine | Euronews

The self-sufficient toilet could be on its way powered by urine | Euronews | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
The Bristol BioEnergy Centre is working on bacteria which breaks down chemicals in urine releasing energy as electrons which turns into electricity.
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Pollution-fighting Vertical Forest buildings coming to China

Pollution-fighting Vertical Forest buildings coming to China | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Two living, breathing buildings will be able to produce around 130 pounds of clean oxygen a day.
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Enough with counter-intuitive cryptic physics theories

Enough with counter-intuitive cryptic physics theories | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Science progresses through discussions and debates. Sometimes accepted notions are too well-established to be open to questioning.
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Download and use Census TIGER/Line shapefiles in R

Download and use Census TIGER/Line shapefiles in R | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
tigris - Download and use Census TIGER/Line shapefiles in R

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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The Bold Plan for a Moon Base Is Coming Together

The Bold Plan for a Moon Base Is Coming Together | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Imagine an international research station on the moon, where astronauts and cosmonauts and taikonauts and any other-nauts from around the world conduct science experiments, gather resources, build infrastructure, study our home planet from afar, and erect a new radio telescope to probe the mysteries of the ancient cosmos. This is the vision of Jan Woerner, the German civil engineer who serves as the Director General of the European Space Agency. He calls it "Moon Village."
The Vision

Moon Village isn't so much a literal village as it is a vision of worldwide cooperation in space. It is part of Woerner's larger concept of "Space 4.0."

Woerner, you see, breaks down the history of space exploration into four periods. All of ancient and classical astronomy is lumped into Space 1.0, the space race from Sputnik to Apollo is Space 2.0, and the establishment of the International Space Station defines the period of Space 3.0. As the largest space station—which holds the record for longest continuous human habitation, 16 years and counting—the ISS soars as a shining example of successful, longterm, peacetime international cooperation like no other program in the history of humankind.

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4 Approaches To Natural Language Processing & Understanding

4 Approaches To Natural Language Processing & Understanding | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
SHRDLU features a world of toy blocks where the computer translates human commands into physical actions, such as “move the red pyramid next to the blue cube.” To succeed at such tasks, the computer…
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Let Robots Handle Your Emotional Burnout at Work

Let Robots Handle Your Emotional Burnout at Work | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
In 1974, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Studs Terkel published an oral history of Americans on the job in his book Working. He interviewed people from all walks of life, whether newspaper delivery boy…
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Mapping in R just got a whole lot easier

Mapping in R just got a whole lot easier | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Thanks to the R simple features project and packages like tmaps that support it, choropleth maps are now a breeze to create with R. I'll walk you through mapping median U.S. wages for IT managers. And don't miss the last step: A tiny snippet of code changes a static map into an interactive one!

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
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WHO Calls for R&D of New Antibiotics to Combat Resistant Bacteria

WHO Calls for R&D of New Antibiotics to Combat Resistant Bacteria | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
The World Health Organization has published a list of antibiotic-resistant priority pathogens that pose the greatest threat to human health.
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March for Science: reaching out for bottom-up governance

March for Science: reaching out for bottom-up governance | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Scientists, with the March for Science due to take place on 22nd April 2017, give a strong signal, that bottom-up input into policy is needed.
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From Research to Reward: Social Science Studies the Most Hazardous Thing on the Road: You

From Research to Reward: Social Science Studies the Most Hazardous Thing on the Road: You | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
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From Research to Reward: How a Political Scientist Knows What Our Enemies Will Do (Often Before They Do)

From Research to Reward: How a Political Scientist Knows What Our Enemies Will Do (Often Before They Do) | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
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Big Data Science: Expectations vs. Reality

Big Data Science: Expectations vs. Reality | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Big Data Science: Expectations vs. Reality

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Nader Ale Ebrahim's curator insight, February 6, 6:35 AM
Big Data Science: Expectations vs. Reality
LALIT SINGH MD MBA's curator insight, February 8, 2:44 AM
an apt depiction of how big data learning in reality is! 
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Scientists transform used cooking oil into material that's stronger than steel

Graphene out of cooking oil? Breakthrough process could make the wonder material cheaper to produce.
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The Algorithm God

The Algorithm God | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
For some time now, I see a growing number of articles praising algorithms and computer programs. They will apparently solve all of our problems, including
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Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2017

Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2017 | Research & Technology | Scoop.it
Beall’s List of Predatory Publishers 2017

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Karen R. Harker's curator insight, January 4, 9:58 AM
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