Research, sustain...
Follow
Find tag "Children"
3.9K views | +0 today
Research, sustainability and learning
Bridging the gap between science and the practice of learning for nature, the environment and sustainability
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Child-orientated environmental education influences adult knowledge and household behaviour - IOPscience

Child-orientated environmental education influences adult knowledge and household behaviour - IOPscience | Research, sustainability and learning | Scoop.it

Environmental education is frequently undertaken as a conservation intervention designed to change the attitudes and behaviour of recipients. Much conservation education is aimed at children, with the rationale that children influence the attitudes of their parents, who will consequently change their behaviour. Empirical evidence to substantiate this suggestion is very limited, however. For the first time, the researchers used a controlled trial to assess the influence of wetland-related environmental education on the knowledge of children and their parents and household behaviour. They demonstrate adults exhibiting greater knowledge of wetlands and improved reported household water management behaviour when their child has received wetland-based education at Seychelles wildlife clubs. The research team distinguishes between 'folk' knowledge of wetland environments and knowledge obtained from formal education, with intergenerational transmission of each depending on different factors. This study provides the first strong support for the suggestion that environmental education can be transferred between generations and indirectly induce targeted behavioural changes.

 

P Damerell, C Howe and E J Milner-Gulland

Published 12 februari 2013

 

You can download the article at: http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/8/1/015016/article

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

An assessment of schoolyard renovation strategies to encourage children's physical activity

An assessment of schoolyard renovation strategies to encourage children's physical activity | Research, sustainability and learning | Scoop.it

Peter Anthamatten, Lois Brink, Sarah Lampe, Emily Greenwood, Beverly Kingston and Claudio Nigg


International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2011, 8:27

 

Children in poor and minority neighborhoods often lack adequate environmental support for healthy physical development and community interventions designed to improve physical activity resources serve as an important approach to addressing obesity. In Denver, the Learning Landscapes (LL) program has constructed over 98 culturally-tailored schoolyard play spaces at elementary schools with the goal to encourage utilization of play spaces and physical activity. In spite of enthusiasm about such projects to improve urban environments, little work has evaluated their impact or success in achieving their stated objectives. This study evaluates the impacts of LL construction and recency of renovation on schoolyard utilization and the physical activity rates of children, both during and outside of school, using an observational study design.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Theory of Mind

Understanding that other people can think and feel differently from you is an essential skill in relation to sustainable development. Understanding how other minds work is a competence children master around the age of 4.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Play, naturally: A review of children´s natural play

Play, naturally: A review of children´s natural play | Research, sustainability and learning | Scoop.it

The authors provide an extensive review of the literature related to children’s natural play. They begin by examining the human relationship with the natural world and the importance of play and direct interaction with the physical environment to children. Lester and Maudsley then review the important opportunities that natural play provides, such as the creation of special places, and the numerous documented and potential benefits of children’s play in natural settings, including the development of a sense of self and independence.

 

The authors discuss evidence demonstrating a decline in children’s access and opportunities to play in natural spaces and provide a range of suggestions to support children’s opportunities to play in natural settings, such as through the design of effective playgrounds, school grounds, and environmental play projects, as well as ensuring adequate access to parks and nature reserves

 

by Stuart Lester and Martin Maudsley, Playwork Partnerships

Published 2 August 2006, Children's Play Council

 

To download the report go to: http://www.playday.org.uk/PDF/play-naturally-a-review-of-childrens-natural%20play.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Student gains from Place-based Education | Fact sheet #2 November 2007

Student gains from Place-based Education | Fact sheet #2 November 2007 | Research, sustainability and learning | Scoop.it

Children, Youth and Environments Center for Research and Design

 

Prepared by Louise Chawla and Myriam Escalante, and with contributions from Michael Duffin.

 

Place-based or environment-based education uses the environment as an integrating context (EIC) across disciplines. It is characterized by exploration of the local community and natural surroundings, hands-on experiences of environmental discovery and problem-solving, interdisciplinary curricula, team teaching, and learning that accommodates students’ individual skills and abilities. Research shows that this approach delivers many benefits to students.

 

Download the factsheet: http://www.foresthistory.org/education/Curriculum/StudentGains-Chawla.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Designing Environments to Promote Play-Based Science Learning| CYE Volumes

Designing Environments to Promote Play-Based Science Learning| CYE Volumes | Research, sustainability and learning | Scoop.it

The Children, Youth and Environments Journal has just published its largest issue ever. Volume 21, number 2 includes more than 20 original, peer-reviewed papers on topics such as child development in colonias; street children; travel to school; place attachment; gendered play in natural landscapes; and perceptions of nature.

 

It includes papers on formal and informal science learning through play; playing to learn at home and in the community; and researching playful science learning.

 

Papers cover research from the Canada, the Dominican Republic, Germany, Israel, Kenya, Mexico, Norway, Sweden, and the USA.

 

The full issue can be accessed at http://www.colorado.edu/journals/cye/index_issues.htm

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Exploring the Relationship between Digital Nature Photography and Children’s Connectedness to Nature

Exploring the Relationship between Digital Nature Photography and Children’s Connectedness to Nature | Research, sustainability and learning | Scoop.it

MSc Thesis by Seth F. Spencer

University of Minnesota Duluth| 2012

 

Digital photography can be an enjoyable and exciting activity for children. It may also increase connectedness to nature levels. Questionnaires were sent to four different Duluth, MN area 4th grade classrooms. The questionnaire was comprised of the Connectedness to Nature Index (Cheng & Monroe, 2010) and one open-ended question. The questionnaire was given as a pretest and a posttest, after two of the schools participated in a program using digital cameras. Eight-five percent (n=99) responded to the questionnaire.

 

Findings of the study revealed that the respondents generally had a strong connectedness to nature before and after their use of digital cameras. While quantitative data showed no significant change between pretest and posttest connectedness to nature levels, qualitative and anecdotal data suggested that the use of digital cameras can influence connectedness to nature levels in children. The results may be used to emphasize the importance of finding new and creative ways to connect today’s children with a sense of connectedness to nature

 

Download the thesis report: http://hdl.handle.net/10792/325 or

http://d-commons.d.umn.edu:8180/jspui/handle/10792/325

more...
Linda Wilson's comment, August 20, 2012 1:35 PM
Interesting study. I tried to download the pdf but Internet Explorer says it can't download it. Is there another way? Perhaps contact information for Mr. Spencer?
Rebekah Tauritz's comment, August 20, 2012 1:43 PM
Hi lwilson, I don't know why IE can't download the file. I use Firefox, but I thought IE is used more commonly. I added a second link, does this work for you? Or perhaps you can use Firefox..?

Rebekah
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Natural Play. An evaluation of GfL's project work with eight primary schools in Central Scotland

Natural Play. An evaluation of GfL's project work with eight primary schools in Central Scotland | Research, sustainability and learning | Scoop.it

A growing body of evidence suggests that play has a significant impact on almost every area of children’s lives. It also suggests that children have significantly fewer opportunities for non-prescriptive ‘free play’ than previous generations have enjoyed.

 

Most children spend at least 2000 hours of their life in a school playground, probably more than in any other outdoor play setting. Despite this, many UK schools do little to create the kind of rich play environments and experiences that we know are important for children.

 

In other parts of Europe, play is viewed as a crucial aspect of school life – and their playgrounds and play practice are radically different from what we know here in the UK. (see for example our case studies on the radical approach taken by schools in Berlin).

 

With support from Inspiring Scotland, we embarked on a 2-year project with 8 Scottish primary schools to explore whether some of these more ambitious European-style ideas could be adapted to a UK context and to assess what the benefits of this approach might be for children.

 

This report summarises the approach we took, the lessons we learned and the impact of these projects on children and schools.

 

January 2012

 

Read more: http://www.ltl.org.uk/pdf/Natural-Play-Evaluation-Report-1332848772.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Researchers outline ways to advance scientific thinking in children

ScienceDaily (Aug. 18, 2011)

 

Science educators aim to nurture, enrich and sustain children's natural and spontaneous interest in scientific knowledge using many different approaches. In a new paper published in the journal Science, Carnegie Mellon University's David Klahr and Jamie Jirout and Illinois State University's Corinne Zimmerman use psychology research to outline ways to advance the science of science instruction.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Curiosity and learning: The skill of critical thinking by Laura Schulz

Laura Schulz is an Associate Professor of Cognitive Sciences. She works at the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences (Early Childhood Cognition Lab) of MIT.

 

She studies the representations and learning mechanisms that underlie our understanding of the physical and social world.

 

Her research looks at:

1) how children infer the concepts and causal relations that enable them to engage in accurate prediction, explanation, and intervention;

2) the factors that support curiosity and exploration, allowing children to engage in effective discovery and

3) how the social-communicative context (e.g., demonstrating evidence, explaining events, disagreeing about hypotheses) affects children’s learning.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rebekah Tauritz
Scoop.it!

Earthworm research spurred pupils to action | The Research Council of Norway

Earthworm research spurred pupils to action | The Research Council of Norway | Research, sustainability and learning | Scoop.it

Earthworms were last year’s topic for the Research Council of Norway’s annual research campaign, launched to generate interest in research among children and young people.

 

Researchers were thrilled by the findings submitted by 142 schools. In the course of the autumn of 2010, school pupils from all across Norway identified 15 different species of earthworm, including some finds rare in Norway. Scientists were surprised and delighted.

 

Read more: http://www.forskningsradet.no/en/Newsarticle/Earthworm_research_spurred_pupils_to_action/1253965291544

more...
No comment yet.