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Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from Heron
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A Replica Of An Anesthesia Machine Built Of Out 30, 000 LEGOs | athenna-design | Web Design | Design de Comunicação Em Foz do Iguaçu | Web Marketing | Paraná

A Replica Of An Anesthesia Machine Built Of Out 30, 000 LEGOs | athenna-design | Web Design | Design de Comunicação Em Foz do Iguaçu | Web Marketing | Paraná | Research Log | Scoop.it
San Francisco-based builder Eric Harshbarger has managed to build a 3-D LEGO replica of an anesthesia machine. Using over 30, 000 LEGO pieces, the full-scale model features all the buttons, screens and exterior components of the original.

Via cafonso
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

The time spent on this lego machine is time well spent. This lego masterpiece is something I though was ridiculuosly cool. To have thought of an idea like that and made it is a total WOW factor.

 

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Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from Alzheimer's and Dementia
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Does Anesthesia Cause Dementia or Memory Loss in the Elderly? | Alzheimer's Reading Room

Does Anesthesia Cause Dementia or Memory Loss in the Elderly? | Alzheimer's Reading Room | Research Log | Scoop.it
Does anesthesia increase the odds of developing dementia later in life? Does anesthesia hasten memory loss in persons already living with Alzheimer's and dementia?

Via Bob DeMarco
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

This article expands on the possible risks that patients could be taking when undergoing surgery. Such risks include dementia,alzheimers, and memory loss. I have not heard of any case like this so this is something I can observe and take in as I go through my career.

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Bob DeMarco's curator insight, August 8, 2013 12:56 PM
Urinary Tract Infections Can Hasten Memory Loss in Alzheimer's Patients

http://www.alzheimersreadingroom.com/2010/10/urinary-tract-infections-can-hasten.html

 

Researchers have found a link between common infections, such as a cold, stomach bug or urine infection and an increase in inflammation like reactions in the brain which lead to an increased rate of cognitive decline. Study results show that people who got an infection had twice the rate of memory loss as people without infections.

Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from Action for Addiction
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Sufentanil Addiction | Drug Addiction Treatment

Sufentanil Addiction | Drug Addiction Treatment | Research Log | Scoop.it
Every so often a nurse anesthesiologist or a physician anesthesiologist is found dead in a hospital setting, usually in a bathroom or some other locked room.

Via in-recovery.com
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

This article is very interesting because it includes the danger that you are surrounded by while at your job. When being an anesthesiologist you learn about many powerful drugs that are used in surgeries and the ability to easily obtain them. This leads to self controll and the ability to handle yourself so you wont start doing drugs during hard times in life because there are cases upon which doctors had overdosed themselves even though they knew everything about the drug.

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Scooped by Igor Stakhnyuk
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Best-paying jobs are in the medical field

Best-paying jobs are in the medical field | Research Log | Scoop.it
You’d think chief executive officers would have the highest-paying jobs given the buzz their annual compensation packages attract each year, but when it comes to average annual pay, CEOs take a back seat to anesthesiologists.
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

I chose this article to show the people who are interested in knowing what the best paying jobs are. Fortunetly being an anesthsiologist is at the number one spot.

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Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from Anesthesia Equipment
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Spacelabs ARKON Anesthesia System - Metropolitan Medical Services

Spacelabs ARKON Anesthesia System - Metropolitan Medical Services | Research Log | Scoop.it
Learn more about our Spacelabs ARKON Anesthesia System, its features, and its optional features. Call us today at 800-482-6537 or go online to request a quote today!

Via Scott Smith
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

I chose this article because it describes some of the tools that i will hopefuly be working with. The article names and the equipment and describes the feature of it.

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Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from Strange days indeed...
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7 Amazing Anesthesia Awareness stories

7 Amazing Anesthesia Awareness stories | Research Log | Scoop.it
Anesthesia awareness isn't just in movies, here are 7 amazing real-life stories of people who have suffered from this phenomenon.

Via F. Thunus
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

This article was very interesting to me because the patients who all went through surgery were full awake and felt the pain from incisions but couldnt move a muscle or say something to the surgeon. Although this rarely happens and is the fault of the anesthesia provider, this is article that amuses me but tells me also to not make mistakes if i ever become an anesthesia doctor.

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Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from Sleep Dentistry
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More Dentist Anesthesiologists Are Needed in the Pediatric Setting - Newswise (press release)

More Dentist Anesthesiologists Are Needed in the Pediatric Setting - Newswise (press release) | Research Log | Scoop.it
More Dentist Anesthesiologists Are Needed in the Pediatric SettingNewswise (press release)Newswise — The demand for dentist anesthesiologists in pediatric dental practices is on the rise.

Via Quentin Howard
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

This article really opened my mind on the different job settings that anesthesiologist have the avaliablility to work at. Honestly I never knew that anesthesiologist worked with dentist.

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Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from Scientificus
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Same neurons at work in sleep and under anesthesia

Same neurons at work in sleep and under anesthesia | Research Log | Scoop.it

Anesthesiologists aren’t totally lying when they say they’re going to put you to sleep. Some anesthetics directly tap into sleep-promoting neurons in the brain, a study in mice reveals.

 

The results may help clarify how drugs that have been used around the world for decades actually put someone under. “It’s kind of shocking that after 170 years, we still don’t understand why they work,” says study coauthor Max Kelz of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia.

 

Most neurons in the brain appear to be calmed by anesthetics, says neuropharmacologist and anesthesiologist Hugh Hemmings Jr. of Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. But the new results, published online October 25 in Current Biology, show that two common anesthetics actually stimulate sleep-inducing neurons.

 

“It’s unusual for neurons to be excited by anesthetics,” Hemmings says...


Via Xè Simò
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

Here the article adresses the fact of what s going on while you are under anesthesea. They include support from an expirement involving mice and talk about the difference between how the brain is during sleep and how it is during anesthesea.

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Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from Amazing Science
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Awake? Are Patients Under Anesthesia Really Unconscious?

Awake? Are Patients Under Anesthesia Really Unconscious? | Research Log | Scoop.it

The prospect of undergoing surgery while not fully "under" may sound like the stuff of horror movies. But one patient in a thousand remembers moments of awareness while under general anesthesia, physicians estimate. The memories are sometimes neutral images or sounds of the operating room, but occasionally patients report being fully aware of pain, terror, and immobility. Though surgeons scrupulously monitor vital signs such as pulse and blood pressure, anesthesiologists have no clear signal of whether the patient is conscious. But a new study finds that the brain may produce an early-warning signal that consciousness is returning—one that's detectable by electroencephalography (EEG), the recording of neural activity via electrodes on the skull.

 

"We've known since the 1930s that brain activity changes dramatically with increasing doses of anesthetic," says the study's corresponding author, anesthesiologist Patrick Purdon of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. "But monitoring a patient's brain with EEG has never become routine practice."

 

Beginning in the 1990s, some anesthesiologists began using an approach called the bispectral (BIS) index, in which readings from a single electrode are connected to a device that calculates, and displays, a single number indicating where the patient's brain activity falls on a scale of 100 (fully conscious) to zero (a "flatline" EEG). Anything between 40 and 60 is considered the target range for unconsciousness. But this index and other similar ones are only indirect measurements, Purdon explains. In 2011, a team led by anesthesiologist Michael Avidan at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri, found that monitoring with the BIS index was slightly less successful at preventing awareness during surgery than the nonbrain-based method of measuring exhaled anesthesia in the patient's breath. Of the 2861 patients monitored with the BIS index, seven had memories of the surgery, whereas only two of 2852 patients whose breath was analyzed remembered anything.

 

Despite that, Purdon and his co-workers were hopeful that an "unconsciousness signature" in the brain could be found. Last year, the team worked with three epilepsy patients who'd had electrodes implanted in their brains in preparation for surgery to reduce their seizures. Recording from single neurons in the cortex, where awareness is thought to reside, the researchers gave the patients an injection of the anesthetic propofol. They asked the volunteers to press a button whenever they heard a tone, recording the activity of the neurons. Loss of consciousness, defined as the point when the patients stopped pressing the button, was immediate—40 seconds after injection. Just as immediately, groups of neurons began to emit a characteristic slow oscillation, a kind of ripple in the cells' electrical field. The neurons weren't entirely inactive, but bursts of activity occurred only at specific points in this oscillation, resulting in inconsistent brain cell activity.

 

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

I chose this article because many people who have had surgery depend on it being very painless since you are asleep while the procedure is being done, but many people ask the question if they are realy unconsious during the surgery. This article answers the that question.

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Rescooped by Igor Stakhnyuk from The Job of an Anesthesiologist
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How to Become an Anesthesiologist - Anesthesiologist Salary ...

How to Become an Anesthesiologist - Anesthesiologist Salary ... | Research Log | Scoop.it
How to Become an Anesthesiologist. Anesthesiology is interesting and challenging field of study. No surgical operation will be conducted without anesthesiologist's control. However, to become an anesthesiologist you will ...

Via Sommer Queally
Igor Stakhnyuk's insight:

I chose this article because it best describes the schooling and what you need to go through to become an anesthesiologist. It talks about the ceritificates required and medical school.

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Sommer Queally's curator insight, January 13, 2013 10:12 PM

     Anesthesiology is interesting and challenging. It is used in many surgical proceudres. However, to become an anesthesiologist you will spend much time and efforts. An undergraduate education is needed and you must become a doctor of medicine first. Your anesthesiologist career starts only after graduation from medical school with M.D. degree. To become an anesthesiologist you will spend four more years. As you can see, anesthesiologist education takes 12 years in general. However, the time spent for studying pays back in future: anesthesiologists receive one of the highest salaries in medical field. Resident training for anesthesiologists includes one year of medical or surgical internship and three years of anesthesiologist education itself. To become a licensed anesthesiologist you will have to undergo a couple certification stages. The initial step is the UMLE. You will have to pass this exam after the graduation from medical school. It is definitely not easy job to perform, you will be responsible for people's lives, so you must be well-educated and perfectly trained.

Melanie P's curator insight, March 10, 2015 12:52 PM

This was a great article for me, especially given that I am about to enter college. this article outlines the required steps a student of anesthesiology needs to take in order to find a job within the field. One of the most relevant items mentioned was getting an undergraduate degree. Seeing as I am not sure about what career path I am going to go down (aerospace or anesthesiology), it was good to read what the article had to say about an undergraduate degree for someone considering medical school. I plan to major in mechanical engineering so my options remain open on where I can take my life. The article says that one can major in anything they like, but make sure that one takes biology, anatomy, physics and math. Mechanical engineering will cover physics and math, and the university requires biology. Anatomy could easily be worked into my schedule as an elective class. This article also talks about medical school placement tests and the duration of medical studies and practice before a student can practice anesthesiology on his or her own. This process takes around 12 years. That's a long time! One thing I know about myself though is, I love to learn, and I want to make sure I am going to do the best possible job I can do within my field. If that means extensive study, so be it. I look forward to a lengthy education because I know that the benefits will far outweigh the costs.