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Dirty dogs: Homes with pooches loaded with bacteria

Dirty dogs: Homes with pooches loaded with bacteria | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A dog may not only fill a home with joy, it fills a home with a whole lot of bacteria, new research suggests.  But that doesn't mean you have to kick your pooch out of the bed.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dirty dogs: Home with pooches loaded with bacteria: Dr. Holly Menninger & researchers of CALS' Your Wild Life Team at NC State University find that dog owners and their homes carry bacteria from their pets. But that may not be a bad thing for human health. Read more | http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/05/22/18427037-dirty-dogs-homes-with-pooches-loaded-with-bacteria

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic, also swept through an NCSU research project collecting data on NYC insects. Researchers return to the storm-ravaged region shortly. Ecologists Amy Savage & Elsa Youngsteadt placed sticky card traps, data loggers & other measuring devices in NYC park trees. Youngsteadt was studying how urban warming affects arthropods (scale insects, leaf hoppers, caterpillars). Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, from the lab of Dr. Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU. You'll find their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

Read the story at:

http://bulletin.ncsu.edu/2013/02/insects/

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RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com

RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A paper published by researchers at N.C. State University found cockroach grooming habits may help developers of insecticide products find better ways of controlling pests.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Coby Schal, entomologist in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences coauthored the study with authors were Dale Batchelor of NCSU’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility & Marianna Zhukovskaya, Russian Academy of Sciences.

 

Read the paper in PNAS, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/02/04/2656341/nc-state-researchers-say-roach.html#storylink=misearch#storylink=cpy
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Backyard Farming Gets Fancy

Backyard Farming Gets Fancy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Williams-Sonoma, Fifth Season Gardening, Terrain Cater to Modern Homesteaders Who Demand Only the Best Equipment
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

$1200 Chicken coops and more ... retailers target the upscale urban trend with high-end equipment.

 

Video:

http://live.wsj.com/video/chicken-coops-get-a-highend-makeover/FBC5E4F6-5B42-4737-AC8A-2943A3E8CA39.html#!FBC5E4F6-5B42-4737-AC8A-2943A3E8CA39

 

Slide show

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324329204578271980099505570.html?mod=#slide/1

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, reflects on a year's worth of blogs in Scientific American.

 

Dr. Dunn runs the project, The Wildlife of Your Body

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

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The Urban Heat Island Could Be Attracting Bugs

The Urban Heat Island Could Be Attracting Bugs | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The hotter neighborhoods of Raleigh are awash in scale insects, an ominous indicator of how bug populations might swell in a globally warmer world.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Some insects like it hot! CALS entomologist, Emily Meineke finds that scale insect pests thrive in the warmth of urban heat islands. Read more: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/neighborhoods/2013/03/urban-heat-islands-are-making-cities-lousy-insects/5118/

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

 

 

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 6, 2013 3:58 PM

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of Your Wild Life fame, reflects on a year's worth of blogging for Scientific American. Always enlightening & entertaining.

 

Learn more about the Your Wild Life project here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

 

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Buildings Have Biology Too | The Daily Scan | GenomeWeb

Buildings Have Biology Too | The Daily Scan | GenomeWeb | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"Applications are being accepted for a working group called the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment, according to Your Wild Life, an ecological website hosted by North Carolina State University."

 

The Your Wild Life team leader is ecologist Dr. Rob Dunn. Here's his call to practitioners & professionals:

"The Basics: We need your help. We are organizing the first working group aimed at understanding the evolutionary biology of the built environment—our bedrooms, our houses, our backyards and our cities. This working group will occur June 10 – 14, 2013, in Durham, North Carolina. We are now inviting applications for participants in the working group."

 

Interested in participating? Visit

http://www.yourwildlife.org/2013/01/evolutionary-biology-of-the-built-environment-working-group-call-for-participants/

 

Dr. Dunn also blogs at Scientific American -- here's one of his latest posts:

http://www.robrdunn.com/2013/01/11-ways-to-avoid-answering-a-question-a-year-in-review/

 

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Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants

Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

The Citizen Science research team, The Wildlife of Your Body, seeks participants for a new project on the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment.

 

Says Dr. Dunn: "We’d like to convene a diverse group of scientists and practitioners at various stages in their careers, from graduate students and post-docs to senior scientists, representing an array of disciplines including the organismal -ologies (e.g. microbiology, entomology, etc.), engineering, architecture, anthropology, evolution, genetics, bioinformatics, art and design. We want to be inclusive of any field that you can convince us has something to bear on studying evolution in the built environment."

 

Apply here, soon!

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dERTb2l5ZmlaVW95a0tUNUlkdTYyRmc6MQ

 

Sponsored by a partnership between the Sloan Foundation and the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center.


Project Leaders: Jonathan Eisen, Rob Dunn, Kerry Kinney and Craig McClain

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