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Agriculture brings science and math to life for North Carolina high school students

Agriculture brings science and math to life for North Carolina high school students | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The Produce News - Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Agriculture brings science & math to life for NC high school students: Strawberry breeder, Dr. Jeremy Pattison at the Plants for Human Health Institute, part of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, helps create a real-world research experience for Rowan County high school students Watch the video here: http://www.producenews.com/index.php/90-videos/10333-agriculture-brings-science-and-math-to-life-for-north-carolina-high-school-students

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Plants for Human Health Institute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Coordinates: 35°30′05″N 80°37′26″W / 35.501486°N 80.6240119°W / 35.501486; -80.6240119

The Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI) is a North Carolina State University research and education organization located at the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis, North Carolina, USA. The institute is devoted to research involving food crops, like fruits and vegetables, and the potential health-promoting properties they convey when consumed.

PHHI is part of the North Carolina State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, which staffs the institute with faculty from the departments of horticultural science; food, bioprocessing and nutrition sciences; plant biology; genetics; and agricultural and resource economics.[1] The institute has both research and Cooperative Extension components. Dr. Mary Ann Lila, a world-renowned blueberry researcher,[2] is director of the Plants for Human Health Institute.[3]

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Among the crops studied are blueberries, broccoli, cabbage, and strawberries.

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Nicky Park: These fruits are berry good for you - Life & Style - NZ Herald News

Nicky Park: These fruits are berry good for you - Life & Style - NZ Herald News | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The tail end of berry season is approaching. Come the end of April, you won't be seeing these fruity beauties on the shelves. This is the bad news. The good news is, that frozen berries
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

These fruits are berry good for you: Dr. Mary Ann Lila of the Plants for Human Health Institute, part of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, tells the New Zealand Herald why berries "are the top of the heap," when it comes to health benefits. | Read more | http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=10875351

 

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Day one on the dean’s tour: Mills River | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU

Day one on the dean’s tour: Mills River | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"New CALS Dean Richard Linton is on the road, getting to know North Carolina and how the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is making a difference every day in the lives of the state’s people.

 

Day One: Mills River and the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center. The center, near Asheville, serves as a hub for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in the western part of North Carolina.

 

More than 40 faculty and staff members conduct applied research and empower western North Carolina’s people through extension education programs related to agriculture, the environment, family and community.

 

The center is known for its innovative work related to tomato breeding, fish farming, herbs and organics, Christmas trees — and much more.


ITINERARY: A hops yard, sturgeon four to five feet long, energy crops considerably higher than an elephant’s eye – these were just a few of the things new College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Dean Rich Linton encountered during a day at the Mountain Horticultural Crops Research and Extension Center in Mills River. ..."

 

The Mountain Horticul;tural Crops Research & Extension Center, iMills River, web site

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/

 

 

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