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Researchers trying to identify, catalog every species in Moore County preserve

Researchers trying to identify, catalog every species in Moore County preserve | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
SOUTHERN PINES - Jamie Sasser cradled a tiny woodpecker in his hands. The bird quivered slightly as Sasser peered intently at it.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Researchers trying to identify, catalog every species in Moore County preserve | Entomologist, Dr. Clyde Sorenson, of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University took several of his students to scout for insects in the 24-hour Weymouth Woods bio-blitz last weekend. Read more about their adventure in this special wildlife refuge here | http://www.fayobserver.com/articles/2013/05/27/1256089

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[Ant Control Issue] March of the Asian Needle Ant - PCT - Pest Control Technology

[Ant Control Issue] March of the Asian Needle Ant - PCT - Pest Control Technology | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers at North Carolina State University have discovered that the invasive Argentine ant may have met its match in the form of another invasive ant species — the Asian needle ant.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Eleanor Spicer Rice and Dr. Jules Silverman made the discovery. Dr. Silverman notes that if the Asian needle ants are successful in displacing the Argentine ant, then it could be the next major invasive species. No other ant has competed with the Argentine ant ... until now.  Read more  | http://www.pctonline.com/pct0413-asian-needle-ant.aspx

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Butterflies and Bombs | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Butterflies and Bombs | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The St. Francis’ Satyr is small, brown, and fabulously rare. Once found across North Carolinian sedge meadows, the federally endangered butterfly is now restricted to a ...
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Laura Jane Martin blogs in @SciAm about Nick Haddad's Fort Bragg research on the very rare, endangered sedge butterfly, St. Francis' Satyr. Read more about Dr. Haddad's interesting forays into military territory in search of the elusive beauty: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2013/03/26/butterflies-and-bombs/?WT_mc_id=SA_CAT_ENGYSUS_20130328

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Purdue recognizes Brandenburg as Distinguished Agriculture Alumnus | CALS News Center Purdue recognizes Brandenburg as Distinguished Agriculture Alumnus | News from the College of Agriculture and L...

Purdue recognizes Brandenburg as Distinguished Agriculture Alumnus | CALS News Center Purdue recognizes Brandenburg as Distinguished Agriculture Alumnus | News from the College of Agriculture and L... | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Rick Brandenburg, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Distinction in the Department of Entomology, will be recognized March 1 as one of eight Distinguished Agriculture Alumni Award winners at Purdue University. Brandenburg earned a bachelor’s degree in entomology from Purdue in 1977. The award honors mid-career alumni who have a record of outstanding accomplishments, have made significant contributions to their profession or society and have exhibited high potential for professional growth.

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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Researchers Find Asian Needle Ants Displacing Other Aggressive Invaders

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Researchers Find Asian Needle Ants Displacing Other Aggressive Invaders | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Photo of Asian needle ant stinging a termite courtesy of Benoit Guenard.

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS researchers find that one of the most aggressive invasive ant species in the US, the Argentine ant, appears to have met its match in the Asian needle ant. Former NC State PhD student Dr. Eleanor Spicer Rice & Dr. Jules Silverman, Entomology, published their findings in PLoS One:

 

http://scienceblog.com/59643/asian-needle-ants-displacing-other-aggressive-invaders/ ;

 

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0056281

 

 

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

 

 

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 6, 2013 3:58 PM

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

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Parasitic fly spotted in honeybees, causes workers to abandon colonies : Not Exactly Rocket Science

Parasitic fly spotted in honeybees, causes workers to abandon colonies : Not Exactly Rocket Science | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Andrew Core of San Francisco State Univ. has discovered another possible contributor to honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), which threatens crop pollination and food security: a tiny parasitic fly, Apocephalus borealis, which oviposits in the bee's abdomen where the eggs hatch and the larvae eventually kill the host bee. The parasitic fly usually attacks bumblebees; but Dr. Core has found it also reproduces in honeybees, causing them to become confused and wander from the hive at abnormal times, such during the night.

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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 5, 2013 2:41 PM

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of Your Wild Life fame, reflects on a year's worth of blogging for Scientific American. Always enlightening & entertaining.

 

Learn more about the Your Wild Life project here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

 

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Innovative uses of nanotechnology in food and agriculture explored

Innovative uses of nanotechnology in food and agriculture explored | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Examples of current projects in development are presented in a Special Research Section published in Industrial Biotechnology.
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Dual attack on white grubs promising in Carolina sweet potatoes | Vegetables content from Southeast Farm Press

Dual attack on white grubs promising in Carolina sweet potatoes | Vegetables content from Southeast Farm Press | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The white grub is causing serious damage to sweet potatoes in South Carolina and a small section of North Carolina
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Mark Abney, entomologist in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, and grad student Amber Arrington are resesarching the combination of entomopathogens and neonicotinoid pesticides to control plectris white grubs, which damage the sweet potatoes so severely that they are unmarketable, even for processing.

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Mount Airy News - Researchers still seeking to understand Colony Collapse Disorder

Mount Airy News - Researchers still seeking to understand Colony Collapse Disorder | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Dr. David Tarpy, apiculture specialist in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, comments Colony Collapse Disorder, which threatens bee-pollinated crops, the controversy surrounding the role of pesticides in the phenomenon, and his pollinator research program.

 

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

NC Honeybee Research Consortium

http://www.ncsu.edu/project/honey_bee_res/

 

Dr. Tarpy's web site

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/tarpy

 

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Humans Aren’t the Only Animals That Hold Elections

Humans Aren’t the Only Animals That Hold Elections | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

 

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (CALS) at NC State University blogs on lessons humans might draw from animals:

"One of my racquetball buddies, Dave Tarpy [CALS honey bee specialist] ... studies honeybees decisions. Tarpy was a postdoctoral researcher with Tom Seeley and so has learned Seeley’s democracy-documenting ways, but Tarpy is more interested in queens than Seeley is. How do these solitary leaders become who they are? What allows some queens to succeed over others when there is a power vacuum in the hive?"

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A Bitter/Sweet Shift in Cockroach Defenses

A Bitter/Sweet Shift in Cockroach Defenses | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Some populations of roaches have evolved a highly effective strategy to avoid sweet-tasting poison baits, researchers say.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS researchers Dr. Coby Schal, Dr. Jules Silverman & Dr. Ayako Wada-Katsumata report in the prestigious journal, Science, that roaches can change their taste chemistry, making usually appealing sweet food become bitter. So they avoid baits containing glucose. Result: Failed cockroach control!  Now we know why, and how they do it. The innovative research also has implications for control of other insects, such as mosquitoes. Read more & watch the little buggers flee jelly | http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/24/science/a-bitter-sweet-shift-in-cockroach-defenses.html

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Ready Or Not, Here Come The Cicadas!

Ready Or Not, Here Come The Cicadas! | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
North Carolinians in the western Triangle and Triad soon will be visited en masse by the ear-splitting song of the 17-year cicadas. Over the next ten days
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS Entomologist, Dr. Clyde Sorenson, tells WUNC radio about the life cycle and emergence of Brood II of red-eyed 17-year magicicadas, who will shortly emerge from the soil for a mating frenzy. They sound, he says, eerie, like a weird cross between a fire engine and a space ship. There's a sound clip in the story, too! | Read more | http://tinyurl.com/clp2ve6

 

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The Urban Heat Island Could Be Attracting Bugs

The Urban Heat Island Could Be Attracting Bugs | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The hotter neighborhoods of Raleigh are awash in scale insects, an ominous indicator of how bug populations might swell in a globally warmer world.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Some insects like it hot! CALS entomologist, Emily Meineke finds that scale insect pests thrive in the warmth of urban heat islands. Read more: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/neighborhoods/2013/03/urban-heat-islands-are-making-cities-lousy-insects/5118/

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Comb Your Antennae (Science Magazine: May Require Subscription)

Comb Your Antennae (Science Magazine: May Require Subscription) | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Coby Schal and postdoctoral researchers, Dr. Katalin Boroczky and Dr. Ayako Wada-Katsuma ask why cockroaches groom and find that the fastidious behavior sharpens their senses. The discovery may have implications for pest control.

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Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW

Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Video: Cleanliness is next to cockroaches (Science NOW on YouTube) Research team from the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU and Russia finds that fastidious insect grooming enhances sensory performance. Watch the delicate operation to learn more | http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/02/video-cleanliness-is-next-to-coc.html|
| paper in PNAS | http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110

 

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RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com

RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A paper published by researchers at N.C. State University found cockroach grooming habits may help developers of insecticide products find better ways of controlling pests.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Coby Schal, entomologist in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences coauthored the study with authors were Dale Batchelor of NCSU’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility & Marianna Zhukovskaya, Russian Academy of Sciences.

 

Read the paper in PNAS, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/02/04/2656341/nc-state-researchers-say-roach.html#storylink=misearch#storylink=cpy
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Scientists See Insect Outbreaks From Space

Scientists See Insect Outbreaks From Space | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A new tool uses satellite imagery to help researchers track small disturbances such as bug infestations, which may increase in scope as climate changes
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Watch the stunning video of a LandTrendr visualization of the Pacific Northwest and see the colors change as the mountain pine beetle infestation encroaches on the healthy forest.

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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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NCSU Research Explains How Vermicompost-Amended Soils Ward Off Crop Pests / Press Releases / News and Media / Southern SARE - SARE

NCSU Research Explains How Vermicompost-Amended Soils Ward Off Crop Pests / Press Releases / News and Media / Southern SARE - SARE | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Grants and outreach to advance sustainable innovations to the whole of American agriculture.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Yasmin Cardoza and grad student, Amos Little, studied how compost helps plants resist insect pests such as corn earworm, cabbage worm, green peach aphid and cabbage aphid. The research was funded by the Southern SARE program.

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Two New Hessian Fly Management Tools Now Available

Two New Hessian Fly Management Tools Now Available | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

I am very excited about the publication of “Biology and Management of Hessian Fly in the Southeast”, as well as a new video produced by the North Carolina Small Grain Growers Associatio...

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

The video draws on the research of wheat breeder, Dr. Paul Murphy, small grains specialist, Dr. Randy Weisz and entomologist, Dr. Dominic Reisig to demonstrate how to control this insect pest of wheat in the southeast. The video is produced through a collaboration of the NC Small Grain Growers Association and the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University.

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What If God Were a Maggot? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

What If God Were a Maggot? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
“Brother of the blowfly… no one gets to heaven without going through you first.” –Yusef Komunyakaa

Sixteen years ago, my wife and I, along with our friend ...
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Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, blogs in Scientific American on the role of natural recyclers, such as blowflies and scarabs, in ecology and recycling in nature.

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Small Fruits Consortium receives NIFA award | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU

Small Fruits Consortium receives NIFA award | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"The Southern Region Small Fruits Consortium – a six-member group of land-grant universities including N.C. State – has received the 2012 Partnership Award for Multi-State Efforts from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute for Food and Agriculture. The award recognizes exemplary work impacting agriculture, environment, communities or people from a team at a land-grant university, cooperating institution or organization supported by the NIFA."

 

Visit the authoritative website for growers, Extension personnel and professionals at:

http://www.smallfruits.org

 

"N.C. State faculty members have been involved in the following SRSFC projects:

Dr. Frank Louws and Dr. Mahfuzur Rahman (N.C. State, entomology) have received grants for research and extension efforts related to foliar / fruit rot on strawberries.Dr. Hannah Burrack (N.C. State, entomology), Dr. Doug Pfeiffer (Virginia Tech) and Dr. Powell Smith (Clemson) received grants to develop a volunteer monitoring network for spotted wing drosophila, a recent invasive pest of soft-skinned small fruits. The monitoring network allows growers to apply pesticides in a timely manner to minimize losses to this pest.Dr. Gina Fernandez, (N.C. State, horticultural science) and colleagues have received grants since 2002 to develop raspberry and blackberry breeding programs. The program developed the red raspberry, “Nantahala,” which has resulted in commercial fruit sales of $16,000-$27,000 per acre."

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