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Study Exposes Multi-generational Impacts of Pesticide Exposure - eNews Park Forest

Study Exposes Multi-generational Impacts of Pesticide Exposure - eNews Park Forest | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Using the aquatic species Daphnia, commonly referred to as “water fleas,” scientists at North Carolina State University (NC State) determined that exposure to the pesticide pyriproxyfen impacted multiple generations, ultimately resulting in more...
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The team of toxicologist, Dr. Gerald LeBlanc, found that in the model aquatic organism, exposure to the pesticide pyriproxyfen (an insecticide in the juvenile hormone analog (JHA) class) resulted in adverse reproductive effects in females, and production of more male offspring, skewing the sex ratio, with severe effects on future reproduction.  Read news article |  http://tinyurl.com/aou94bn | Paper appears in PLos One | http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0061715

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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 5, 2013 2:41 PM

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com

RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A paper published by researchers at N.C. State University found cockroach grooming habits may help developers of insecticide products find better ways of controlling pests.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Coby Schal, entomologist in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences coauthored the study with authors were Dale Batchelor of NCSU’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility & Marianna Zhukovskaya, Russian Academy of Sciences.

 

Read the paper in PNAS, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/02/04/2656341/nc-state-researchers-say-roach.html#storylink=misearch#storylink=cpy
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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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