Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service
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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Irish Potato Famine-Causing Pathogen Even More Virulent Now

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Irish Potato Famine-Causing Pathogen Even More Virulent Now | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, July 18, 2013 9:23 PM

The plant pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine in the 1840s lives on today with a different genetic blueprint and an even larger arsenal of weaponry to harm and kill plants.

In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, North Carolina State University plant pathologist Jean Ristaino and colleagues Mike Martin and Tom Gilbert from the University of Copenhagen compared the genomes, or sets of all genes, of five 19th century strains of the Phytophthora infestans pathogen with modern strains of the pathogen, which still wreaks havoc on potatoes and tomatoes.

The researchers found that the genes in historical plant samples collected in Belgium in 1845 as well as other samples collected from varied European locales in the late 1870s and 1880s were quite different from modern-day P. infestans genes, including some genes in modern plants that make the pathogen more virulent than the historical strains.

 

Read more | http://news.ncsu.edu/releases/mk-ristaino-infestans-2013/

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of Your Wild Life fame, reflects on a year's worth of blogging for Scientific American. Always enlightening & entertaining.

 

Learn more about the Your Wild Life project here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

 

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NC State News :: Unexpected Finding Shows Climate Change Complexities in Soil

NC State News :: Unexpected Finding Shows Climate Change Complexities in Soil | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Scientists have assumed that elevated CO2 would stimulate the beneficial plant root fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF), to sequester carbon in the soil.

 

This study challenges that assumption, and predictions based upon it, of carbon balance in future climate change. USDA funded the study.

 

Drs. H. David Shew (Plant Pathology) & Thomas Rufty (Crop Science) co-authored with Drs. Fitz Booker & Kent Burkey, of CALS & the USDA Agriculture Research Service. The first author is former NC State graduate student, Lei Cheng; and postdoctoral researchers Cong Tu & Lishi Zhou also co-authored.

 

The article appears in Science for 31 August 2012: Vol. 337 no. 6098 pp. 1084-1087
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1224304

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Carolinas Superintendents Commit $83,000 to Research

Carolinas Superintendents Commit $83,000 to Research | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

The joint research project of CALS' plant pathologist, Dr. Jim Kearns, and Clemson University will run for three years, and focus on mini-ring disease of ultradwarf turfgrass. | Read more | http://tinyurl.com/dxdu6mb ; | Photo:

the Lonnie Poole Golf Course at NC State University

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N.C. State scientists work to stop the spread of boxwood blight | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sc..., NCSU

N.C. State scientists work to stop the spread of boxwood blight | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sc..., NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"Since colonial days, the boxwood has been an important part of American gardens and landscapes. Research from N.C. State University is designed to help keep it that way, in spite of the threat to the plant posed by a disease new to the United States.

 

"N.C. State researchers and extension specialists have led the way in the United States when it comes to finding methods of protect the popular landscape plant from boxwood blight. They were among the first – if not the first – university researchers to alert the public and the landscape and nursery industry to the blight’s presence when it was first found and confirmed in the United States in October 2011. And now they are leading the way in a study to determine which commercially available boxwood species are most susceptible and which ones can withstand the fungus, Cylindroclaidium buxicola, that causes the disease. ..."

 

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