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A Bitter/Sweet Shift in Cockroach Defenses

A Bitter/Sweet Shift in Cockroach Defenses | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Some populations of roaches have evolved a highly effective strategy to avoid sweet-tasting poison baits, researchers say.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS researchers Dr. Coby Schal, Dr. Jules Silverman & Dr. Ayako Wada-Katsumata report in the prestigious journal, Science, that roaches can change their taste chemistry, making usually appealing sweet food become bitter. So they avoid baits containing glucose. Result: Failed cockroach control!  Now we know why, and how they do it. The innovative research also has implications for control of other insects, such as mosquitoes. Read more & watch the little buggers flee jelly | http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/24/science/a-bitter-sweet-shift-in-cockroach-defenses.html

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Find biodiversity in your backyard

Find biodiversity in your backyard | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Holly Menninger is director of public science for Your Wild Life, based at N.C. State University.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

She blogs at http://www.YourWildLife.org on the biodiversity inside people, on people, and wherever they live. Your Wild Life comes from the team of biologist & blogger, Dr. Rob Dunn.

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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » ‘Gold Standard’ Cotton Genome Sequenced

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » ‘Gold Standard’ Cotton Genome Sequenced | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"An international consortium with representatives from most of the world’s major cotton-producing countries, led by Regents Professor Andrew Paterson of the University of Georgia and including Candace Haigler, a North Carolina State University professor of crop science and plant biology, has described the first ‘gold-standard’ genome sequence for cotton. Published today in Nature, this is the culmination of a more than 20-year effort in the analysis of cotton genes, chromosomes and their evolution."

 

Read the paper in Nature here:

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v492/n7429/full/nature11798.html\

 

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Visualize This: Inside a Dinosaur’s Brain | North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Visualize This: Inside a Dinosaur’s Brain | North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"Want to know how well a dinosaur could see, hear and smell? Get inside its head! That’s what a group of researchers from the U.K. and U.S. did when they recreated the brain of a therizinosaur called Erlikosaurus andrewsi — a 10-foot-long feathered theropod that lived in what is now Mongolia during the Cretaceous period, about 90 million years ago.

 

Erlikosaurus is a member of the bird-like “predatory” dinosaur lineage that includes fearsome hunters like Velociraptor, but scientists believe that Erlikosaurus was a peaceful plant-eater. Did the change from predator to prey affect the brain of animals like Erlikosaurus? To test the hypothesis, a team of paleontologists decided to create 3-D models of an Erlikosaurus brain and inner ear and study the areas that corresponded to senses like sight, smell and hearing."

 

A paleontology team including Dr. Lindsay Zanno of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences and the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at North Carolina State University used high-resolution CT scanning and 3-D computer visualization examine how the dinosaur's brain fit inside the skull, and which regions of the brain were well-developed.

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Capturing the Courtship Rituals of Bizarre Birds-of-Paradise : 80beats

Capturing the Courtship Rituals of Bizarre Birds-of-Paradise : 80beats | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"Birds-of-paradise are living, breathing, dancing, singing examples of evolutionary extremes. Isolated in the rainforests of New Guinea, these species evolved in the absence of predators. As such, their designs have been driven by sexual selection—female preference, rather than physical necessity, per se—and the results are over the top."

 

Story includes links to lovely video of the birds courting in rainforests of New Guinea.

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of Your Wild Life fame, reflects on a year's worth of blogging for Scientific American. Always enlightening & entertaining.

 

Learn more about the Your Wild Life project here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

 

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Buildings Have Biology Too | The Daily Scan | GenomeWeb

Buildings Have Biology Too | The Daily Scan | GenomeWeb | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"Applications are being accepted for a working group called the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment, according to Your Wild Life, an ecological website hosted by North Carolina State University."

 

The Your Wild Life team leader is ecologist Dr. Rob Dunn. Here's his call to practitioners & professionals:

"The Basics: We need your help. We are organizing the first working group aimed at understanding the evolutionary biology of the built environment—our bedrooms, our houses, our backyards and our cities. This working group will occur June 10 – 14, 2013, in Durham, North Carolina. We are now inviting applications for participants in the working group."

 

Interested in participating? Visit

http://www.yourwildlife.org/2013/01/evolutionary-biology-of-the-built-environment-working-group-call-for-participants/

 

Dr. Dunn also blogs at Scientific American -- here's one of his latest posts:

http://www.robrdunn.com/2013/01/11-ways-to-avoid-answering-a-question-a-year-in-review/

 

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, reflects on a year's worth of blogs in Scientific American.

 

Dr. Dunn runs the project, The Wildlife of Your Body

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

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Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants

Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

The Citizen Science research team, The Wildlife of Your Body, seeks participants for a new project on the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment.

 

Says Dr. Dunn: "We’d like to convene a diverse group of scientists and practitioners at various stages in their careers, from graduate students and post-docs to senior scientists, representing an array of disciplines including the organismal -ologies (e.g. microbiology, entomology, etc.), engineering, architecture, anthropology, evolution, genetics, bioinformatics, art and design. We want to be inclusive of any field that you can convince us has something to bear on studying evolution in the built environment."

 

Apply here, soon!

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dERTb2l5ZmlaVW95a0tUNUlkdTYyRmc6MQ

 

Sponsored by a partnership between the Sloan Foundation and the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center.


Project Leaders: Jonathan Eisen, Rob Dunn, Kerry Kinney and Craig McClain

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