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Why Are Honeybees Dying?

Why Are Honeybees Dying? | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The past year has been a bad one for America's honeybees, with commercial beekeepers reporting hive losses of up to 50 percent. Some blame the mysterious
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, June 28, 2013 4:22 PM

CALS apiculturist, Dr. David Tarpy joins Dick Rogers, manager of Bayer CropScience's Bee Care Center (under construction in RTP) & Jeffrey Lee, who owns Lee's Bees in Mebane, NC, to discuss the issue. Read more | http://wunc.org/post/why-are-hon

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Researchers trying to identify, catalog every species in Moore County preserve

Researchers trying to identify, catalog every species in Moore County preserve | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
SOUTHERN PINES - Jamie Sasser cradled a tiny woodpecker in his hands. The bird quivered slightly as Sasser peered intently at it.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Researchers trying to identify, catalog every species in Moore County preserve | Entomologist, Dr. Clyde Sorenson, of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University took several of his students to scout for insects in the 24-hour Weymouth Woods bio-blitz last weekend. Read more about their adventure in this special wildlife refuge here | http://www.fayobserver.com/articles/2013/05/27/1256089

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A Bitter/Sweet Shift in Cockroach Defenses

A Bitter/Sweet Shift in Cockroach Defenses | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Some populations of roaches have evolved a highly effective strategy to avoid sweet-tasting poison baits, researchers say.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS researchers Dr. Coby Schal, Dr. Jules Silverman & Dr. Ayako Wada-Katsumata report in the prestigious journal, Science, that roaches can change their taste chemistry, making usually appealing sweet food become bitter. So they avoid baits containing glucose. Result: Failed cockroach control!  Now we know why, and how they do it. The innovative research also has implications for control of other insects, such as mosquitoes. Read more & watch the little buggers flee jelly | http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/24/science/a-bitter-sweet-shift-in-cockroach-defenses.html

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Ready Or Not, Here Come The Cicadas!

Ready Or Not, Here Come The Cicadas! | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
North Carolinians in the western Triangle and Triad soon will be visited en masse by the ear-splitting song of the 17-year cicadas. Over the next ten days
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS Entomologist, Dr. Clyde Sorenson, tells WUNC radio about the life cycle and emergence of Brood II of red-eyed 17-year magicicadas, who will shortly emerge from the soil for a mating frenzy. They sound, he says, eerie, like a weird cross between a fire engine and a space ship. There's a sound clip in the story, too! | Read more | http://tinyurl.com/clp2ve6

 

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Butterflies and Bombs | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Butterflies and Bombs | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The St. Francis’ Satyr is small, brown, and fabulously rare. Once found across North Carolinian sedge meadows, the federally endangered butterfly is now restricted to a ...
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Laura Jane Martin blogs in @SciAm about Nick Haddad's Fort Bragg research on the very rare, endangered sedge butterfly, St. Francis' Satyr. Read more about Dr. Haddad's interesting forays into military territory in search of the elusive beauty: http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2013/03/26/butterflies-and-bombs/?WT_mc_id=SA_CAT_ENGYSUS_20130328

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Comb Your Antennae (Science Magazine: May Require Subscription)

Comb Your Antennae (Science Magazine: May Require Subscription) | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Coby Schal and postdoctoral researchers, Dr. Katalin Boroczky and Dr. Ayako Wada-Katsuma ask why cockroaches groom and find that the fastidious behavior sharpens their senses. The discovery may have implications for pest control.

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Listening, Learning, Leading | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU

Listening, Learning, Leading | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State University"

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Listening, Learning, Leading, new #CALS Dean, Dr. Richard Linton, hits the ground running to learn about the College, #NCSU and NC.

 

The Dean has been traversing the state to meet alumni, stakeholders and partners since he arrived a few months ago.

 

“You’ve got to listen & learn before you can lead," he says; "and I think leadership is about providing opportunities, providing opportunities for faculty and staff and students on campus and providing opportunities for us to grow as a state in agriculture and life sciences. And that’s what I think my job should be all about.”

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic, also swept through an NCSU research project collecting data on NYC insects. Researchers return to the storm-ravaged region shortly. Ecologists Amy Savage & Elsa Youngsteadt placed sticky card traps, data loggers & other measuring devices in NYC park trees. Youngsteadt was studying how urban warming affects arthropods (scale insects, leaf hoppers, caterpillars). Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, from the lab of Dr. Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU. You'll find their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

Read the story at:

http://bulletin.ncsu.edu/2013/02/insects/

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RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com

RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A paper published by researchers at N.C. State University found cockroach grooming habits may help developers of insecticide products find better ways of controlling pests.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Coby Schal, entomologist in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences coauthored the study with authors were Dale Batchelor of NCSU’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility & Marianna Zhukovskaya, Russian Academy of Sciences.

 

Read the paper in PNAS, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/02/04/2656341/nc-state-researchers-say-roach.html#storylink=misearch#storylink=cpy
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ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW

ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW
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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of Your Wild Life fame, reflects on a year's worth of blogging for Scientific American. Always enlightening & entertaining.

 

Learn more about the Your Wild Life project here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

 

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New Book Encourages Readers to “Know Soil Know Life”

New Book Encourages Readers to “Know Soil Know Life” | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Published by the Soil Science Society of America and targeted to high school students, "Know Soil Know Life" challenges readers to see soil not as inert "dirt" but as living material that carries out critical functions for people and the environment.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS soil scientist, Dr. David Lindbo, co-edited the book, which includes a lengthy chapter on careers in soils.

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Getting to Know Our Microbial Roommates

Getting to Know Our Microbial Roommates | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Ecologists are increasingly interested in the great wildlife diversity indoors, where they’ve found that buildings contain identifiable microbial signatures of their human inhabitants.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Mapping the great indoors: Dr. Rob Dunn's Your Wild Life Project is among research efforts to catalog, understand the microbiology of the human built environment discussed in this New York Times article. Dr. Dunn is a faculty member in the Collete of Agriculture & Life Sciences at North Carolina State University. | Read more | http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/28/science/getting-to-know-our-microbial-roommates.html? | Visit the web site for the Your Wild Life Project | http://www.yourwildlife.org/


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Dirty dogs: Homes with pooches loaded with bacteria

Dirty dogs: Homes with pooches loaded with bacteria | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A dog may not only fill a home with joy, it fills a home with a whole lot of bacteria, new research suggests.  But that doesn't mean you have to kick your pooch out of the bed.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dirty dogs: Home with pooches loaded with bacteria: Dr. Holly Menninger & researchers of CALS' Your Wild Life Team at NC State University find that dog owners and their homes carry bacteria from their pets. But that may not be a bad thing for human health. Read more | http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/05/22/18427037-dirty-dogs-homes-with-pooches-loaded-with-bacteria

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[Ant Control Issue] March of the Asian Needle Ant - PCT - Pest Control Technology

[Ant Control Issue] March of the Asian Needle Ant - PCT - Pest Control Technology | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers at North Carolina State University have discovered that the invasive Argentine ant may have met its match in the form of another invasive ant species — the Asian needle ant.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Eleanor Spicer Rice and Dr. Jules Silverman made the discovery. Dr. Silverman notes that if the Asian needle ants are successful in displacing the Argentine ant, then it could be the next major invasive species. No other ant has competed with the Argentine ant ... until now.  Read more  | http://www.pctonline.com/pct0413-asian-needle-ant.aspx

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Three Honored for Global Efforts

Three Honored for Global Efforts | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Three NC State educators were honored with the Outstanding Global Engagement Award from the Office of International Affairs last week.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Three educators received the Outstanding Global Engagement Award from the NCSU Office of International Affairs last week. CALS faculty Dr. Siddhartha Thakur, Asst. Prof. of swine health & reproduction, and Dr. Qiuyun “Jenny” Xiang, Prof. of plant biology, were honored for their efforts to promote international research, teaching, extension and economic  development. Among the other nominees was Dr. Tomislav Vukina, Prof. of agricultural and resource economics. In photo: Dr. Xiang appears on the left and Dr. Thakur, on the right.

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The Urban Heat Island Could Be Attracting Bugs

The Urban Heat Island Could Be Attracting Bugs | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The hotter neighborhoods of Raleigh are awash in scale insects, an ominous indicator of how bug populations might swell in a globally warmer world.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Some insects like it hot! CALS entomologist, Emily Meineke finds that scale insect pests thrive in the warmth of urban heat islands. Read more: http://www.theatlanticcities.com/neighborhoods/2013/03/urban-heat-islands-are-making-cities-lousy-insects/5118/

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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Researchers Find Asian Needle Ants Displacing Other Aggressive Invaders

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Researchers Find Asian Needle Ants Displacing Other Aggressive Invaders | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Photo of Asian needle ant stinging a termite courtesy of Benoit Guenard.

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS researchers find that one of the most aggressive invasive ant species in the US, the Argentine ant, appears to have met its match in the Asian needle ant. Former NC State PhD student Dr. Eleanor Spicer Rice & Dr. Jules Silverman, Entomology, published their findings in PLoS One:

 

http://scienceblog.com/59643/asian-needle-ants-displacing-other-aggressive-invaders/ ;

 

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0056281

 

 

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Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW

Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Video: Cleanliness is next to cockroaches (Science NOW on YouTube) Research team from the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU and Russia finds that fastidious insect grooming enhances sensory performance. Watch the delicate operation to learn more | http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/02/video-cleanliness-is-next-to-coc.html|
| paper in PNAS | http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110

 

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

 

 

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 6, 2013 3:58 PM

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

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Scientists See Insect Outbreaks From Space

Scientists See Insect Outbreaks From Space | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A new tool uses satellite imagery to help researchers track small disturbances such as bug infestations, which may increase in scope as climate changes
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Watch the stunning video of a LandTrendr visualization of the Pacific Northwest and see the colors change as the mountain pine beetle infestation encroaches on the healthy forest.

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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 5, 2013 2:41 PM

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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Taylor Awarded Leopold Fellowship

Taylor Awarded Leopold Fellowship | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Laura Taylor is one of just 20 environmental researchers in North America to receive the prestigious Leopold Leadership Fellowship for 2013.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Laura Taylor' research focuses on policy evaluation and valuation of natural resources & the environment.

Read more here:

http://bulletin.ncsu.edu/2013/01/fellow/

 

Leopold Leadership Program

http://leopoldleadership.stanford.edu/

 

Center for Environmental & Resource Policy at NCSU

http://www.ncsu.edu/cenrep/

 

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What is “Sustainability in Agriculture: An Executive Course” at NC State?: Unique course

What is “Sustainability in Agriculture: An Executive Course” at NC State?: Unique course | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Agricultural sustainability is one of the key challenges for societies throughout the world.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Faculty from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Poole College of Management at NC State have developed a unique Executive Course focused on agricultural sustainability. This science-based, 2-day course is the first in the U.S. that integrates science, economics, and business management. It informs corporate executives on the current factors driving changes in resource availability, environmental regulation, and climate change that are impacting North American & global agriculture.

 

The course also discusses successful business models emerging as corporations explore appropriate paths for a sustainable future. The initial series of courses is being presented to managers and executives of major agricultural corporations.  The purpose is to help prepare leaders in the private sector for the challenging times ahead.

 

To contact the CALS Office of Sustainability Programs to discuss designing an executive short course for your organization, please contact:

 

Dr. Danesha Seth Carley
Coordinator for CALS Sustainability Programs.
201 Patterson Hall Campus Box 7643
North Carolina State University
Raleigh, NC 27695

Phone: 919-515-2717
Email: danesha_carley@ncsu.edu

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