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Ready Or Not, Here Come The Cicadas!

Ready Or Not, Here Come The Cicadas! | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
North Carolinians in the western Triangle and Triad soon will be visited en masse by the ear-splitting song of the 17-year cicadas. Over the next ten days
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS Entomologist, Dr. Clyde Sorenson, tells WUNC radio about the life cycle and emergence of Brood II of red-eyed 17-year magicicadas, who will shortly emerge from the soil for a mating frenzy. They sound, he says, eerie, like a weird cross between a fire engine and a space ship. There's a sound clip in the story, too! | Read more | http://tinyurl.com/clp2ve6

 

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NC State News and Information » New Algorithm Helps Evaluate, Rank Scientific Literature

NC State News and Information » New Algorithm Helps Evaluate, Rank Scientific Literature | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"Keeping up with current scientific literature is a daunting task," write Matt Shipman, "considering that hundreds to thousands of papers are published each day. Now researchers from NC State University have developed a computer program to help them evaluate and rank scientific articles in their field.

The researchers use a text-mining algorithm to prioritize research papers to read and include in their Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD), a public database which manually curates and codes data from the scientific literature describing how environmental chemicals interact with genes to affect human health.

 

"Over 33,000 scientific papers have been published on heavy metal toxicity alone, going as far back as 1926,” explains Dr. Allan Peter Davis, a biocuration project manager for CTD at NC State who worked on the project and co-lead author of an article on the work.'“We simply can’t read and code them all. And, with the help of this new algorithm, we don’t have to'.”

 

CALS biologists Thomas Wiegers, Cynthia Grondin Murphy & Carolyn Mattingly worked with Dr. Davis and colleagues at The Mount Desert Island Biological Laboratory on the NIEHS-funded project.

 

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Listening, Learning, Leading | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU

Listening, Learning, Leading | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State University"

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Listening, Learning, Leading, new #CALS Dean, Dr. Richard Linton, hits the ground running to learn about the College, #NCSU and NC.

 

The Dean has been traversing the state to meet alumni, stakeholders and partners since he arrived a few months ago.

 

“You’ve got to listen & learn before you can lead," he says; "and I think leadership is about providing opportunities, providing opportunities for faculty and staff and students on campus and providing opportunities for us to grow as a state in agriculture and life sciences. And that’s what I think my job should be all about.”

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

 

 

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 6, 2013 8:58 PM

"When Hurricane Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic in October, the superstorm not only damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, displaced thousands of residents and shut down Wall Street, it swept right through the middle of an NC State research project collecting data on insects in New York City. Researchers will return to the storm-ravaged region next month to continue their work.

 

"The project got off to a smooth start last summer when ecologists Amy Savage and Elsa Youngsteadt, researchers in the Departments of Entomology and Biology, deposited sticky card traps, data loggers and other measuring devices in trees throughout New York City parks. This was part of Youngsteadt’s research on how urban warming impacts arthropods (such as scale insects, leaf hoppers and caterpillars.) Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Note: Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, a fascinating, rich group of studies, including Citizen Science, from the lab of Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU.

You can see their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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Buildings Have Biology Too | The Daily Scan | GenomeWeb

Buildings Have Biology Too | The Daily Scan | GenomeWeb | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"Applications are being accepted for a working group called the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment, according to Your Wild Life, an ecological website hosted by North Carolina State University."

 

The Your Wild Life team leader is ecologist Dr. Rob Dunn. Here's his call to practitioners & professionals:

"The Basics: We need your help. We are organizing the first working group aimed at understanding the evolutionary biology of the built environment—our bedrooms, our houses, our backyards and our cities. This working group will occur June 10 – 14, 2013, in Durham, North Carolina. We are now inviting applications for participants in the working group."

 

Interested in participating? Visit

http://www.yourwildlife.org/2013/01/evolutionary-biology-of-the-built-environment-working-group-call-for-participants/

 

Dr. Dunn also blogs at Scientific American -- here's one of his latest posts:

http://www.robrdunn.com/2013/01/11-ways-to-avoid-answering-a-question-a-year-in-review/

 

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, reflects on a year's worth of blogs in Scientific American.

 

Dr. Dunn runs the project, The Wildlife of Your Body

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

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Visualize This: Inside a Dinosaur’s Brain | North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Visualize This: Inside a Dinosaur’s Brain | North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"Want to know how well a dinosaur could see, hear and smell? Get inside its head! That’s what a group of researchers from the U.K. and U.S. did when they recreated the brain of a therizinosaur called Erlikosaurus andrewsi — a 10-foot-long feathered theropod that lived in what is now Mongolia during the Cretaceous period, about 90 million years ago.

 

Erlikosaurus is a member of the bird-like “predatory” dinosaur lineage that includes fearsome hunters like Velociraptor, but scientists believe that Erlikosaurus was a peaceful plant-eater. Did the change from predator to prey affect the brain of animals like Erlikosaurus? To test the hypothesis, a team of paleontologists decided to create 3-D models of an Erlikosaurus brain and inner ear and study the areas that corresponded to senses like sight, smell and hearing."

 

A paleontology team including Dr. Lindsay Zanno of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences and the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at North Carolina State University used high-resolution CT scanning and 3-D computer visualization examine how the dinosaur's brain fit inside the skull, and which regions of the brain were well-developed.

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Three Honored for Global Efforts

Three Honored for Global Efforts | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Three NC State educators were honored with the Outstanding Global Engagement Award from the Office of International Affairs last week.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Three educators received the Outstanding Global Engagement Award from the NCSU Office of International Affairs last week. CALS faculty Dr. Siddhartha Thakur, Asst. Prof. of swine health & reproduction, and Dr. Qiuyun “Jenny” Xiang, Prof. of plant biology, were honored for their efforts to promote international research, teaching, extension and economic  development. Among the other nominees was Dr. Tomislav Vukina, Prof. of agricultural and resource economics. In photo: Dr. Xiang appears on the left and Dr. Thakur, on the right.

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Listening, Learning, Leading | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NC State University

Listening, Learning, Leading | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NC State University | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Listening, Learning, Leading: New CALS Dean Richard Linton has hit the ground running, touring NC to talk with stakeholders to learn more about agriculture in the state, understand stakeholder needs & concerns, and fuel the College's strategic plan.

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Researchers Regroup Post Sandy

Researchers Regroup Post Sandy | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Researchers return to New York City next month to continue their study of insect populations in urban areas in the wake of Hurricane Sandy.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"When Sandy whipped through the Mid-Atlantic, also swept through an NCSU research project collecting data on NYC insects. Researchers return to the storm-ravaged region shortly. Ecologists Amy Savage & Elsa Youngsteadt placed sticky card traps, data loggers & other measuring devices in NYC park trees. Youngsteadt was studying how urban warming affects arthropods (scale insects, leaf hoppers, caterpillars). Savage was studying the ecology of Manhattan’s ants."

 

Both researchers are members of the team of Your Wild Life, from the lab of Dr. Rob R. Dunn in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU. You'll find their profiles here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/about-us/

 

Read the story at:

http://bulletin.ncsu.edu/2013/02/insects/

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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 5, 2013 7:41 PM

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of Your Wild Life fame, reflects on a year's worth of blogging for Scientific American. Always enlightening & entertaining.

 

Learn more about the Your Wild Life project here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

 

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What If God Were a Maggot? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

What If God Were a Maggot? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
“Brother of the blowfly… no one gets to heaven without going through you first.” –Yusef Komunyakaa

Sixteen years ago, my wife and I, along with our friend ...
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, blogs in Scientific American on the role of natural recyclers, such as blowflies and scarabs, in ecology and recycling in nature.

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The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: Drawing on Real Life

The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: Drawing on Real Life | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"This is a guest post by Jennifer Landin, a teaching assistant professor of biology at NC State who teaches a course on biological illustration. Check out why she thinks biological illustration is valuable – and some of the art created in her classroom.


"Those of you in North Carolina can see for yourselves. The North Carolina Aquarium at Roanoke Island will display student illustrations from January 7-April 3, 2013. And the NC Museum of Natural Sciences will show compilation pieces of student work from April 30 to June 3, 2013.

 

"Some examples of the students’ work can be seen below. More information about the course - and another online gallery - can be found here."




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Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants

Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

The Citizen Science research team, The Wildlife of Your Body, seeks participants for a new project on the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment.

 

Says Dr. Dunn: "We’d like to convene a diverse group of scientists and practitioners at various stages in their careers, from graduate students and post-docs to senior scientists, representing an array of disciplines including the organismal -ologies (e.g. microbiology, entomology, etc.), engineering, architecture, anthropology, evolution, genetics, bioinformatics, art and design. We want to be inclusive of any field that you can convince us has something to bear on studying evolution in the built environment."

 

Apply here, soon!

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dERTb2l5ZmlaVW95a0tUNUlkdTYyRmc6MQ

 

Sponsored by a partnership between the Sloan Foundation and the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center.


Project Leaders: Jonathan Eisen, Rob Dunn, Kerry Kinney and Craig McClain

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