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Hepatitis A Outbreak: How A Frozen Berry And Pomegranate Mix Could Sicken 97

Hepatitis A Outbreak: How A Frozen Berry And Pomegranate Mix Could Sicken 97 | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
by Paige Brown, Guest Correspondent @FromTheLabBench Electron micrograph of hepatitis A virions.
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Hepatitis A outbreak: How frozen berry, pomegranate mix could sicken 97 | Food safety experts in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University -- Dr. Ben Chapman & Dr. Lee Ann Jaykus -- explain how water, supply chain, and global trade can affect food safety. Read more | http://tinyurl.com/m2zqr5s

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Genomics students contribute to collaborative, computerized effort to build better blueberries

Genomics students contribute to collaborative, computerized effort to build better blueberries | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Nine students who are involved in a multi-institutional effort to produce better blueberries only see the fruit as codes, symbols, numbers and letters on computer screens, rather than the nutritional, sweet treat they love.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Genomics students contribute to collaborative computerized effort to build better blueberries | Davidson students join an undergraduate project to annotate the blueberry genome. The project includes Lenoir Rhyne College, CALS, and the NC Research Campus (NCRC) at Kannapolis and is funded by the NC Biotech Center. The goal is to breed berries which are larger, tastier, and disease-resistant. The project is run by Dr. Allan Brown of the Plants for Human Health Institute at the NCRC.  |  Read more: http://tinyurl.com/aktc9gf

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Plants for Human Health Institute - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Coordinates: 35°30′05″N 80°37′26″W / 35.501486°N 80.6240119°W / 35.501486; -80.6240119

The Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI) is a North Carolina State University research and education organization located at the North Carolina Research Campus in Kannapolis, North Carolina, USA. The institute is devoted to research involving food crops, like fruits and vegetables, and the potential health-promoting properties they convey when consumed.

PHHI is part of the North Carolina State University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, which staffs the institute with faculty from the departments of horticultural science; food, bioprocessing and nutrition sciences; plant biology; genetics; and agricultural and resource economics.[1] The institute has both research and Cooperative Extension components. Dr. Mary Ann Lila, a world-renowned blueberry researcher,[2] is director of the Plants for Human Health Institute.[3]

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Among the crops studied are blueberries, broccoli, cabbage, and strawberries.

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A Visit to an "Emerald City" of Science - Science Careers Blog

A Visit to an "Emerald City" of Science - Science Careers Blog | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Science Careers visited with researchers at the collaborative North Carolina Research Campus (NCRC) in Kannapolis, NC, a joint venture of several North Carolina universities. The innovative campus, designed to foster interdisciplinary research, includes the Plants for Human Health Institute (PHHI), part of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University.

 

Among other researchers interviewed were PHHI researchers, food scientist Mary Ann Lila, molecular geneticist Allan Brown, metabolic engineer Xu "Sirius" Li, and pharmacogeneticist Slavko Komarnytsky, The group studies health-promoting properties of foods and food-derived products. Among the crops studied are berries and broccoli.

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Bee Economy: Honey, Mites & Diesel Drive Pollination Fees :: The Abstract :: North Carolina State University

Bee Economy: Honey, Mites & Diesel Drive Pollination Fees :: The Abstract :: North Carolina State University | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Dr. Wallace Thurman coauthors the first comprehensive North American survey of the economic forces which drive pollination services.

 

The study, titled "The Economics of Honeybee Pollination Markets," appears in the most recent issue of The American Journal of Agricultural Economics. The appears paper here (full text may require a subscription or payment):

http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ajae/aas031


 

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Agriculture brings science and math to life for North Carolina high school students

Agriculture brings science and math to life for North Carolina high school students | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The Produce News - Covering fresh produce around the globe since 1897
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Agriculture brings science & math to life for NC high school students: Strawberry breeder, Dr. Jeremy Pattison at the Plants for Human Health Institute, part of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, helps create a real-world research experience for Rowan County high school students Watch the video here: http://www.producenews.com/index.php/90-videos/10333-agriculture-brings-science-and-math-to-life-for-north-carolina-high-school-students

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Nicky Park: These fruits are berry good for you - Life & Style - NZ Herald News

Nicky Park: These fruits are berry good for you - Life & Style - NZ Herald News | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The tail end of berry season is approaching. Come the end of April, you won't be seeing these fruity beauties on the shelves. This is the bad news. The good news is, that frozen berries
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

These fruits are berry good for you: Dr. Mary Ann Lila of the Plants for Human Health Institute, part of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, tells the New Zealand Herald why berries "are the top of the heap," when it comes to health benefits. | Read more | http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=10875351

 

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Small Fruits Consortium receives NIFA award | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU

Small Fruits Consortium receives NIFA award | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State
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"The Southern Region Small Fruits Consortium – a six-member group of land-grant universities including N.C. State – has received the 2012 Partnership Award for Multi-State Efforts from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute for Food and Agriculture. The award recognizes exemplary work impacting agriculture, environment, communities or people from a team at a land-grant university, cooperating institution or organization supported by the NIFA."

 

Visit the authoritative website for growers, Extension personnel and professionals at:

http://www.smallfruits.org

 

"N.C. State faculty members have been involved in the following SRSFC projects:

Dr. Frank Louws and Dr. Mahfuzur Rahman (N.C. State, entomology) have received grants for research and extension efforts related to foliar / fruit rot on strawberries.Dr. Hannah Burrack (N.C. State, entomology), Dr. Doug Pfeiffer (Virginia Tech) and Dr. Powell Smith (Clemson) received grants to develop a volunteer monitoring network for spotted wing drosophila, a recent invasive pest of soft-skinned small fruits. The monitoring network allows growers to apply pesticides in a timely manner to minimize losses to this pest.Dr. Gina Fernandez, (N.C. State, horticultural science) and colleagues have received grants since 2002 to develop raspberry and blackberry breeding programs. The program developed the red raspberry, “Nantahala,” which has resulted in commercial fruit sales of $16,000-$27,000 per acre."

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A look at the economic impact of honeybees - Triangle Business Journal

A look at the economic impact of honeybees - Triangle Business Journal | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Not everyone associates honeybees directly with the economy, but honeybee pollination...
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