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Rubredoxin the Indestructible | Biochem Blogs

Rubredoxin the Indestructible | Biochem Blogs | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Rubredoxin protein from thermophilic and mesophilic bacteria are compared to examine features that result in thermostability
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After 2 Years Scientists Still Can’t Solve Belly Button Mystery, Continue Navel-Gazing | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

After 2 Years Scientists Still Can’t Solve Belly Button Mystery, Continue Navel-Gazing | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"This is a confession. I started out as a respectable sort of ecologist studying rain forests and then at some point my road turned and I ended up where I am today, lost among the belly buttons."


Ecologist, Rob R. Dunn talks about The Belly Button Project, part of his research on The Wildlife of Your Body ...


It's a Citizen Science project, and you can join!


Check out the web site at:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/


and on Twitter:

https://twitter.com/YourWild_Life


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Going Deep: Soliciting Explanations for the Mysteries of the Wild Life of Your Belly Button | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Going Deep: Soliciting Explanations for the Mysteries of the Wild Life of Your Belly Button | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Scientists give you all their data in the hopes that you will outsmart them  ...So you want to be a scientist? Here is your chance...."

 

Dr. Rob Dunn blogs in Scientific American on the first release of data from the Belly Button Project, his team's Citizen Science project, charting new territory in the study of the microbiology and ecology of the human navel ...

 

Belly Button Diversity 2.0

http://bbdata.yourwildlife.org/

 

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E. coli adapts to colonize plants

E. coli adapts to colonize plants | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
This is from a U.K. Institute of Food Research press release: To find out more, the IFR team took the first comprehensive look at the differences between the populations of E. coli growing on crop plants and populations in the mammalian gut.

 

Findings:

Strains found to vary genetically throughout a given field
Strains found on lleaf surfaces formed biofilms, presumed protective against desiccation, more readily
Leaf surface strains used sucrose & other plant-derived sugars more readily
Clear evidence of environmental selection

 

The findings could be valuable in food safety/protection.

 

For more food safety information, check out our Food Safety Information sheets at:

http://foodsafetyinfosheets.wordpress.com/

 

from our food safety specialist, Dr. Ben Chapman

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/4hfcs/people/ben-chapman.html

 

And check out the food safety blog, barflog

http://barfblog.foodsafety.ksu.edu/barfblog

 

 

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Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of Your Wild Life fame, reflects on a year's worth of blogging for Scientific American. Always enlightening & entertaining.

 

Learn more about the Your Wild Life project here:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

 

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Short Sharp Science: Belly button samples reveal wonderland of fluffy fauna

Short Sharp Science: Belly button samples reveal wonderland of fluffy fauna | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

On Rob Dunn's Wildlife of the Body Citizen Science in The Belly Button Project:

 

"If you were told you had an ecosystem living in your belly button, it might come as a bit of shock. Well, you probably do. These are just a few of the samples that Belly Button Biodiversity (BBB), a group of scientists from North Carolina University in Raleigh and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, have taken from themselves as well as students, science bloggers and others.

BBB want to strike down the "bad bacteria" stereotype and teach the world that many bacteria are harmless, helpful and a lot of times just hanging around, mooching off your body."

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The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: Navel-Gazing Researchers ID Which Species Live In Our Belly Buttons (But Don’t Know Why)

The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: Navel-Gazing Researchers ID Which Species Live In Our Belly Buttons (But Don’t Know Why) | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"Researchers have discovered which bacteria species are most commonly found in our bellybuttons, but have still not discovered what governs which species will be found on which people. These are the first published findings of the Belly Button Biodiversity project led by NC State’s Dr. Rob Dunn."

 

You can read the free, open acess paper here:

 

"A Jungle in There: Bacteria in Belly Buttons are Highly Diverse, but Predictable" by:

Hulcr J, Latimer AM, Henley JB, Rountree NR, Fierer N, et al. (2012) PLoS ONE 7(11): e47712.

http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047712

 

The Belly Button Diversity Project is part of the larger Dunn initiative called Your Wildlife.org.

See:

http://www.yourwildlife.org

 

and on Twitter:

@YourWild_Life

 

 

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