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The Glory of Leaves - Rob R. Dunn in National Geographic Magazine

The Glory of Leaves - Rob R. Dunn in National Geographic Magazine | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Sometimes a masterwork hangs in a museum. Other times it hangs from the branch of a tree or rounds out a slender stem.

 

Ecologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, contemplates the diversity of leaf morphology, color & anatomy, and the consistent marvel of photosynthesis, in the October National Geographic.

 

Language to do them justice!

 

http://www.YourWildlife.org

 

https://twitter.com/RobRDunn

 

 

 

 

 

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Congratulations to Michael Simone-Finstrom for NIFA Postdoctoral Fellowship to study honey bees

Congratulations to Michael Simone-Finstrom for NIFA Postdoctoral Fellowship to study honey bees | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

The project integrates Dr. Simone-Finstrom's research paradigm with new experimental methods including instrumental insemination and RNAi technologies to explore "social immunity" in honey bees.

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Report: Animal production can grow sustainably | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU

Report: Animal production can grow sustainably | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Economist, Dr. Kelly Zering chairs committee issuing new Cast report titled:

 

Water and Land Issues Associated with Animal Agriculture: A U.S. Perspective

 

Free full text download here:

 

http://www.cast-science.org/publications/?water_and_land_issues_associated_with_animal_agriculture_a_us_perspective&show=product&productID=261302

 

 

 

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Second West Nile death & 3 new cases reported across the state of North Carolina

Second West Nile death & 3 new cases reported across the state of North Carolina | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The new cases are part of a national epidemic that’s on pace to be the worst in the 13-year history of the disease in the United States.

 

CALS Public Health Entomologist, Dr. Michael Reiskind, comments on the ecology of the disease and the difficulty of predicting outbreaks.

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Cut Down Rain Forests, Lose Your Rain | 80beats | Discover Magazine

Cut Down Rain Forests, Lose Your Rain | 80beats | Discover Magazine | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Ulva Island rain forest in New Zealand.

 

It's clear that cutting down rain forests to plant crops, however fulfilling in the short-term for a farmer, is a disaster..."

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New publication: Vermicomposting: Worms Can Recycle Your Garbage

CALS Extension Solid Waste Specialist & researcher, Rhonda Sherman, explains how to compost food waste using environmentally-friendly earthworms. Color photos.

 

Advantages of vermicomposting:

• Reduces the amount of garbage that needs to be collected from your home, and thus, it may reduce your garbage collection bill;
• Produces less odor and attracts fewer pests than putting raw food scraps into a garbage container;
• Saves the water and electricity that kitchen sink garbage disposal units consume;
• Requires little space, labor, or maintenance;
• Allows you to compost food discards indoors year-round;
• Produces a free, high-quality soil amendment (vermicompost);
• Spawns free earthworms for fishing.

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NC State News :: Unexpected Finding Shows Climate Change Complexities in Soil

NC State News :: Unexpected Finding Shows Climate Change Complexities in Soil | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Scientists have assumed that elevated CO2 would stimulate the beneficial plant root fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF), to sequester carbon in the soil.

 

This study challenges that assumption, and predictions based upon it, of carbon balance in future climate change. USDA funded the study.

 

Drs. H. David Shew (Plant Pathology) & Thomas Rufty (Crop Science) co-authored with Drs. Fitz Booker & Kent Burkey, of CALS & the USDA Agriculture Research Service. The first author is former NC State graduate student, Lei Cheng; and postdoctoral researchers Cong Tu & Lishi Zhou also co-authored.

 

The article appears in Science for 31 August 2012: Vol. 337 no. 6098 pp. 1084-1087
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1224304

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