Research from the...
Follow
Find tag "#ecology"
1.8K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Find biodiversity in your backyard

Find biodiversity in your backyard | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Holly Menninger is director of public science for Your Wild Life, based at N.C. State University.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

She blogs at http://www.YourWildLife.org on the biodiversity inside people, on people, and wherever they live. Your Wild Life comes from the team of biologist & blogger, Dr. Rob Dunn.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

What If God Were a Maggot? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

What If God Were a Maggot? | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
“Brother of the blowfly… no one gets to heaven without going through you first.” –Yusef Komunyakaa

Sixteen years ago, my wife and I, along with our friend ...
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, blogs in Scientific American on the role of natural recyclers, such as blowflies and scarabs, in ecology and recycling in nature.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants

Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment Working Group: Call for Participants | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

The Citizen Science research team, The Wildlife of Your Body, seeks participants for a new project on the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment.

 

Says Dr. Dunn: "We’d like to convene a diverse group of scientists and practitioners at various stages in their careers, from graduate students and post-docs to senior scientists, representing an array of disciplines including the organismal -ologies (e.g. microbiology, entomology, etc.), engineering, architecture, anthropology, evolution, genetics, bioinformatics, art and design. We want to be inclusive of any field that you can convince us has something to bear on studying evolution in the built environment."

 

Apply here, soon!

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dERTb2l5ZmlaVW95a0tUNUlkdTYyRmc6MQ

 

Sponsored by a partnership between the Sloan Foundation and the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center.


Project Leaders: Jonathan Eisen, Rob Dunn, Kerry Kinney and Craig McClain

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Public meeting will consider hydrilla infestation at Lake Waccamaw State Park | WWAY NewsChannel 3 | Wilmington NC News

Public meeting will consider hydrilla infestation at Lake Waccamaw State Park | WWAY NewsChannel 3 | Wilmington NC News | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"Hydrilla is a submerged aquatic plant that can create nearly impenetrable mats of stems and leaves on a lake’s surface."

 

CALS aquatic weed specialist, Dr. Rob Richardson, will meet with citizens Dec. 11 to discuss the hydrilla infestation in Lake Waccamaw.

 

Dr. Richardson has worked for several years on the exotic weed, which is difficult to eradicate, affects water ecology, water quality, and recreational activities and hopes to help control the problem to preserve the lake's unique qualities.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Fewer dams can mean better fishing in N.C.

Fewer dams can mean better fishing in N.C. | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Beginning next spring, American shad will jump up a natural-looking "rock arch rapids," a 200-foot slope of rock added to the downstream side of the Cape Fear Lock and Dam No. 1. The fish will swim to their ancestral spawning grounds.

 

CALS Biologist, Dr. Joseph Hightower says when lifted by locks, 35% of the migrating shad succeeded in getting past the dams.

 

CALS Biology grad student, Joshua Raabe has been tagging the shad, bass and other fish making the trip, to monitor their success.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Humans Aren’t the Only Animals That Hold Elections

Humans Aren’t the Only Animals That Hold Elections | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

 

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (CALS) at NC State University blogs on lessons humans might draw from animals:

"One of my racquetball buddies, Dave Tarpy [CALS honey bee specialist] ... studies honeybees decisions. Tarpy was a postdoctoral researcher with Tom Seeley and so has learned Seeley’s democracy-documenting ways, but Tarpy is more interested in queens than Seeley is. How do these solitary leaders become who they are? What allows some queens to succeed over others when there is a power vacuum in the hive?"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Going Deep: Soliciting Explanations for the Mysteries of the Wild Life of Your Belly Button | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Going Deep: Soliciting Explanations for the Mysteries of the Wild Life of Your Belly Button | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Scientists give you all their data in the hopes that you will outsmart them  ...So you want to be a scientist? Here is your chance...."

 

Dr. Rob Dunn blogs in Scientific American on the first release of data from the Belly Button Project, his team's Citizen Science project, charting new territory in the study of the microbiology and ecology of the human navel ...

 

Belly Button Diversity 2.0

http://bbdata.yourwildlife.org/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: Navel-Gazing Researchers ID Which Species Live In Our Belly Buttons (But Don’t Know Why)

The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: Navel-Gazing Researchers ID Which Species Live In Our Belly Buttons (But Don’t Know Why) | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"Researchers have discovered which bacteria species are most commonly found in our bellybuttons, but have still not discovered what governs which species will be found on which people. These are the first published findings of the Belly Button Biodiversity project led by NC State’s Dr. Rob Dunn."

 

You can read the free, open acess paper here:

 

"A Jungle in There: Bacteria in Belly Buttons are Highly Diverse, but Predictable" by:

Hulcr J, Latimer AM, Henley JB, Rountree NR, Fierer N, et al. (2012) PLoS ONE 7(11): e47712.

http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0047712

 

The Belly Button Diversity Project is part of the larger Dunn initiative called Your Wildlife.org.

See:

http://www.yourwildlife.org

 

and on Twitter:

@YourWild_Life

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Honeybees harbor antibiotic-resistance genes | ScienceBlog.com

Honeybees harbor antibiotic-resistance genes | ScienceBlog.com | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Bacteria in the guts of honeybees are highly resistant to the antibiotic tetracycline, probably as a result of decades of preventive antibiotic use in...

 

Yale University researchers find that routine oxytetracycline use to prevent foulbrood appears to have caused genetic adaptation in bacteria in the honeybee.

 

The resistant bacteria were not found in honey, however.

 

Check out our Apiculture site, also:

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/apiculture/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Earth's Last Unexplored Wilderness: Your Very Own Home | Ecosystems | DISCOVER Magazine

Earth's Last Unexplored Wilderness: Your Very Own Home | Ecosystems | DISCOVER Magazine | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"Biologists are starting to explore the woolly ecosystems in our homes and hospitals, and figuring out how they can make us sick or keep us healthy. ...

 

"Most studies of microbes in the home have focused on a particular location, such as the shower curtain or the hot-water heater. Now North Carolina State ecologist Rob Dunn aims to survey what’s living on everything—from pillowcases to refrigerators—in thousands of U.S. residences.

 

"Last fall Dunn began his “Wildlife of Our Homes” project with a pilot study in which 40 volunteers swabbed eight locations in their houses and mailed back the samples....

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

That’s a Wrap: Day 3 of #AntsOnBroadway

That’s a Wrap: Day 3 of #AntsOnBroadway | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Rob Dunn's YourWildlife.org Team finishes collecting ants as part of his cool citizen science project, this time in the Big Apple! Check out the photos & blog at http://www.YourWildlife.org

 

Photo: Courtesy of Benoit Guenard.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Earth's Last Unexplored Wilderness: Your Very Own Home | Ecosystems | DISCOVER Magazine

Earth's Last Unexplored Wilderness: Your Very Own Home | Ecosystems | DISCOVER Magazine | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Biologists are starting to explore the woolly ecosystems in our homes and hospitals, and figuring out how they can make us sick or keep us healthy."

 

CALS' Rob Dunn's and his team are part of this effort. Their contribution is The Wildlife of Your Home project, included in the Discover discussion. Read more about Rob's project at:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

Twitter:

@YourWild_Life

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

NC State News & Information » New Fish Species Offers Literal Take on ‘Hooking Up’

NC State News & Information » New Fish Species Offers Literal Take on ‘Hooking Up’ | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Dr. Brian Langerhans discovers a new Gambusia (mosquitofish) with unusual morphology in Mexico.

 

Full paper may require subscription:

"Gambusia quadruncus (Cyprinodontiformes: Poeciliidae): A new species of mosquitofish from east-central Mexico published online ahead of print in September 2012 issue of Journal of Fish Biology

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8649.2012.03397.x

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Buildings Have Biology Too | The Daily Scan | GenomeWeb

Buildings Have Biology Too | The Daily Scan | GenomeWeb | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"Applications are being accepted for a working group called the Evolutionary Biology of the Built Environment, according to Your Wild Life, an ecological website hosted by North Carolina State University."

 

The Your Wild Life team leader is ecologist Dr. Rob Dunn. Here's his call to practitioners & professionals:

"The Basics: We need your help. We are organizing the first working group aimed at understanding the evolutionary biology of the built environment—our bedrooms, our houses, our backyards and our cities. This working group will occur June 10 – 14, 2013, in Durham, North Carolina. We are now inviting applications for participants in the working group."

 

Interested in participating? Visit

http://www.yourwildlife.org/2013/01/evolutionary-biology-of-the-built-environment-working-group-call-for-participants/

 

Dr. Dunn also blogs at Scientific American -- here's one of his latest posts:

http://www.robrdunn.com/2013/01/11-ways-to-avoid-answering-a-question-a-year-in-review/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review

Rob Dunn – 11 Ways to Avoid Answering a Question: A Year in Review | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn, of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, reflects on a year's worth of blogs in Scientific American.

 

Dr. Dunn runs the project, The Wildlife of Your Body

http://www.yourwildlife.org/

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

What Does It Take to Fool a Snake? Send in the Robot

What Does It Take to Fool a Snake? Send in the Robot | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Trying to dupe real animals with mechanical ones is an increasingly popular methodology among biologists in order to study wildlife.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

UNC-TV -- Life-changing television - A Visit to the Eno River

UNC-TV -- Life-changing television - A Visit to the Eno River | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

WUNC-TV/NPR interviews Dr. Rob Richardson, an aquatic weed researcher in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, about the infestation of the invasive exotic weed, Hydrilla, in the popular scenic Eno River in Durham, NC.

 

The River is part of the local water supply; and the weed affects not only water quality but the ecology of the river and its plants and animals, such as fish, herons, and turtles. It also interfers with popular recreational activities, such as paddling and fishing.

 

Click on the December 4 program, "A Visit to the Eno River" to watch.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

After 2 Years Scientists Still Can’t Solve Belly Button Mystery, Continue Navel-Gazing | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

After 2 Years Scientists Still Can’t Solve Belly Button Mystery, Continue Navel-Gazing | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"This is a confession. I started out as a respectable sort of ecologist studying rain forests and then at some point my road turned and I ended up where I am today, lost among the belly buttons."


Ecologist, Rob R. Dunn talks about The Belly Button Project, part of his research on The Wildlife of Your Body ...


It's a Citizen Science project, and you can join!


Check out the web site at:

http://www.yourwildlife.org/


and on Twitter:

https://twitter.com/YourWild_Life


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Short Sharp Science: Belly button samples reveal wonderland of fluffy fauna

Short Sharp Science: Belly button samples reveal wonderland of fluffy fauna | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

On Rob Dunn's Wildlife of the Body Citizen Science in The Belly Button Project:

 

"If you were told you had an ecosystem living in your belly button, it might come as a bit of shock. Well, you probably do. These are just a few of the samples that Belly Button Biodiversity (BBB), a group of scientists from North Carolina University in Raleigh and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, have taken from themselves as well as students, science bloggers and others.

BBB want to strike down the "bad bacteria" stereotype and teach the world that many bacteria are harmless, helpful and a lot of times just hanging around, mooching off your body."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Gulf spill harmed small fish, studies indicate | Environment | Science News

Gulf spill harmed small fish, studies indicate | Environment | Science News | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Ecologist, Dr. Damian Shea, finds that weather oil is less toxic, as new chemical analyses show that weather reducing oil's propensity to shed polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into water ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Corpses, Cadaver bugs and Climate Change | Minda Berbeco

Corpses, Cadaver bugs and Climate Change | Minda Berbeco | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Climate change credited with changing fauna found in cadavers ...

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Did You Know… | North Carolina Cooperative Extension

Did You Know… | North Carolina Cooperative Extension | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"By now, you have probably seen, or at least heard about, the Kudzu bug, Megacopta cribaria. This newly introduced invasive pest feeds on kudzu, soybeans, and many other plants in the bean family. With kudzu and soybeans drying up as the weather turns cold, Cooperative Extension is fielding a number of calls from growers and homeowners with kudzu bugs on and in their homes. ..."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

An Evening of Insects | North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

An Evening of Insects | North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Oct. 25, 2012 | Thursday, 6:30pm

 

Among the 15-minute talks are these, from CALS researchers:

Basement Bugs: The Camel Cricket Story
by Dr. Holly Menninger, Director of Public Science for Rob Dunn's Your Wildlife Program
(see http://www.YourWildlife.org)

The Fascinating Lives of Bees
by Dr. David Tarpy, our bee specialist

North Carolina’s Rarest Butterflies
by Dr. Nick Haddad, an ecologist who studies & tracks these endangered creatures

Everning Starts at 6:30 and is free.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

Rising rates for rent-a-bees

Rising rates for rent-a-bees | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"Pollination is basic science, but the cost of it is getting more complicated.

 

"CALS economist, Dr. Walter Thurman, finds that rising honey prices, invasive mites and higher diesel fuel costs have increased the price of services performed by commercial beekeepers during the past 20 years.

 

"Dr. Thurman's is the first comprehensive study of North American pollination markets."

 

This means higher consumer prices for the approximately 75% of food crops which are bee-pollinated.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by CALS Research, NCSU
Scoop.it!

The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: Bringing Bugs into the Classroom

The Abstract :: North Carolina State University :: Bringing Bugs into the Classroom | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Dr. David Buchwalter, of our Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, blogs about his most recent classroom outreach program. He writes:

 

"Last month, I teamed up with other biological researchers to conduct a workshop for high school teachers and science educators in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Titled “The Ecophysiology and Evolution of Aquatic Insects:  A Workshop for High School Teachers,” the workshop was designed to give educators the scientific background and physical tools/supplies needed to bring interdisciplinary and inquiry-based study into the classroom with a focus on aquatic insects. The workshop was funded by a grant I received from the National Science Foundation.

 

"Aquatic insects provide a great springboard into various scientific topics because they are ecologically important and widely used as ecological indicators. They also have fascinating adaptations for aquatic life. Also, they are everywhere and very easy to collect out in nature, providing an opportunity for students to learn more about their immediate environment. My primary goal for the workshop was to stimulate curricular development that combined both field based collections and hands on activities in high school classrooms."

more...
No comment yet.