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Is Norovirus, a food borne pathogen? Conversation with Lee-Ann Jaykus, Ph.D.

"Is Norovirus, a food borne pathogen? with Lee-Ann Jaykus, Ph.D., Professor, Food Science, College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCState University, Raleigh, NC"

 

In this YouTube audio interview on the AME Food Testing Show (about 38 minutes long), Dr. Jaykus explains the research goals of her team, funded by a $25 million USDA grant --  USDA's largest ever for food safety.

 

Dr. Jaykus leads the USDA-National Institute of Food and Agriculture Food Virology Collaborative, which consists of more than 30 collaborators from academia, industry and government who will focus on enhanced understanding, surveillance and control of food-borne human noroviruses, with the ultimate goal of reducing the burden of food-borne disease and the human suffering it causes.

 

Dr. Jaykus explains that Norovirus biology differs from that of bacteria, presenting unique challenges in detection, deactivation, and infection prevention.

 

Find more here:

http://www.ncsu.edu/faculty-and-staff/bulletin/2011/08/nullifying-norovirus/

 

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NC State News and Information » Importance of Gene-Gene Interactions Shown in Study

NC State News and Information » Importance of Gene-Gene Interactions Shown in Study | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

A new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that the epistatic network in fruit flies can be used to predict variation in quantitative genetic traits -- those controlled by multiple genes.

 

A team of researchers at NC State University published the paper, for  which Dr. Trudy Mackay, Wm. Neal Reynolds and Distinguished University Professor of Genetics, is the corresponding author.

 

The paper bolsters the effort to predict how genes affect physical or behavioral traits through the genotype-phenotype map. Understanding how genes interact in the process known as epistasis would move the effort closer to the goal.

 

The effects of these gene-gene interactions ... are difficult to gauge in human populations because some variations are unknown, says Dr. Trudy Mackay.

 

The pnas paper can be found here:
http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2012/08/29/1213423109

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SFNToday.com: Two Ag Research Centers in NC Turn 100 This Tear

SFNToday.com: Two Ag Research Centers in NC Turn 100 This Tear | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

NC Commissioner of Agriculture, Steve Troxler, explains in an interview with the Southern Farm Network that the Oxford Tobacco Research Station and the Tidewater Research Station in Plymouth, NC celebrate 100 years of agricultural research this year.

 

He also explains the unusual partnership of the NC Department of Agriculture and the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (CALS) at NCSU in the organization and operation of the stations and their research programs. Both of the birthday stations are owned by NCSU.

 

You can see web sites for all of our experiment stations here:

http://harvest.cals.ncsu.edu/ncars/index.cfm?pageID=2276

 

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Wheat weed control topic of North Carolina meeting | Grains content from Southeast Farm Press

Wheat weed control topic of North Carolina meeting | Grains content from Southeast Farm Press | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Based on last year’s success and the ongoing high prices for soybeans for double-cropping, North Carolina growers are expected to plant another record crop of wheat this fall.

 

On Sept. 17, CALS weed scientist & researcher, Dr. Wes Everman, will discuss the most recent research-based wheat weed control methods, chemicals & recommendations.

 

Image: USDA

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US Extension Programs Are Model for Agricultural Management in Other Countries | NCSU Researchers Study Livestock Sustainability

US Extension Programs Are Model for Agricultural Management in Other Countries | NCSU Researchers Study Livestock Sustainability | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A group of NC State researchers have studied whether livestock production can keep up with population growth.

 

Economist, Dr. Kelly Zering notes findings that modern agricultural animal production can be sustainable, with the right investments.

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New publication: Vermicomposting: Worms Can Recycle Your Garbage

CALS Extension Solid Waste Specialist & researcher, Rhonda Sherman, explains how to compost food waste using environmentally-friendly earthworms. Color photos.

 

Advantages of vermicomposting:

• Reduces the amount of garbage that needs to be collected from your home, and thus, it may reduce your garbage collection bill;
• Produces less odor and attracts fewer pests than putting raw food scraps into a garbage container;
• Saves the water and electricity that kitchen sink garbage disposal units consume;
• Requires little space, labor, or maintenance;
• Allows you to compost food discards indoors year-round;
• Produces a free, high-quality soil amendment (vermicompost);
• Spawns free earthworms for fishing.

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Kudzu bugs continue to spread | Soybeans | Content from Southeast Farm Press

Kudzu bugs continue to spread | Soybeans | Content from Southeast Farm Press | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"Kudzu bugs, those tenacious little imports from Asia, continue to spread across the Southeast and continue to plague soybean growers, especially in the Carolinas." Entomology researcher, Dr. Dominic Reisig, says some growers sprayed prematurely; but damage is also difficult to predict.

 

Monitoring is more economical. Farmers can use the Southeast Early Detection Nertwork (SEEDN), here:

http://www.kudzubug.org/

 

There, farmers will find videos on how to sample for monitoring using sweep nets, information on control, and other resources.

 

The invasive insect has spread rapidly throughout the southeast in just a few growing seasons and is expected to have an economic impact in some areas.

 

photos: Richard Evans, USDA

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Initiative to support modernization of field research launched to honor Dr. David Smith | CALS News Center, NCSU

Initiative to support modernization of field research launched to honor Dr. David Smith | CALS News Center, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"The Smith Initiative will fund needed equipment and services to help ensure that the state’s field research facilities have the 21st-century infrastructure required for emerging agricultural challenges, help farmers utilize technology to meet good agricultural practice standards and deliver new solutions to feed the world. Inviting ongoing support, Dr. Sylvia Blankenship, CALS dean in the interim, announced at the reception that, thanks to more than 40 lead contributors, the initiative had already accrued more than $35,000. Smith himself is among the lead donors to the initiative."

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Cotton Field Day is Sept. 12 | CALS News Center

Cotton Field Day is Sept. 12 | CALS News Center | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

N.C. State University’s Cotton Field Day will take place Sept. 12 at the Upper Coastal Plain Research Station in Rocky Mount. The bi-annual event, co-sponsored by the N.C. Cotton Producers Association, will focus on latest research into cotton tillage, variety trials, disease and insect management and rotational considerations.


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Animal production can grow sustainably | News from the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU

Animal production can grow sustainably |  News from the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

New report from the Council on Agricultural Science & Technology (CAST)

 

Excerpt from CALS news article by Natalie Hampton:

As the world’s middle class nearly triples in number, demand for meat, dairy products and eggs is expected to rise by as much as 100% by 2050. The question is, can agricultural production meet that demand without causing extensive environmental damage?

 

An NC State University professor was among a group of U.S. academics who addressed this question in the Council for Agricultural Science and Technology Issue Paper, Water and Land Issues Associated with Animal Agriculture: A U.S. Perspective.

 

Dr. Kelly Zering, Associate Professor and Extension Specialist in Agricultural and Resource Economics in NCSU's College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (CALS), chaired a group of five university faculty and a consulting environmental engineer who explored the issue of increased livestock production and environmental impacts.

 

Their paper responded to a 2006 issue paper of the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization, Livestock’s Long Shadow.

 

Free download of report, here:

http://www.cast-science.org/publications/?water_and_land_issues_associated_with_animal_agriculture_a_us_perspective&show=product&productID=261302

 

 

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CALS 2012 Soybean & Tillage Field Day, Sept. 5, 2012

Soybean & Tillage Field Day, Upper Piedmont Research Station, Reidsville, NC, Sept. 5, 2012

 

Please RSVP & Join us! Everyone is welcome to register, visit the station, and hear about new CALS research in soybean and tillage methods.

 

Highlights: Soybean production information; long-term tillage trials
including yield, soil compaction, controlled traffic; soil organic matter;
insect pest management; erosion measurements using ground-based
lidar; remote sensing technologies for soil and crop management.
3 hours CCA (2 SW, 0.5 PM, 0.5 CM), 0.5 hours pesticide credits available

 

See the link above for more information & a map.

 

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N.C. State Snags New Plant Scientist, Continues Growth at N.C. Research Campus | Plants For Human Health Institute, CALS, NCSU

N.C. State Snags New Plant Scientist, Continues Growth at N.C. Research Campus | Plants For Human Health Institute, CALS, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

"Dr. Tzung-Fu Hsieh specializes in systems biology, a relatively new research field which studies  interactions between the components of biological systems, and how those relationships affect system functions and behaviors. His area of focus is known as epigenetics, which seeks to understand changes in gene behaviors which are caused by factors other than mutations in DNA.

 

Epigenetics plays an important role in plant development.

 

For example, Hsieh studies the development of endosperms, the placenta-like tissue inside the seeds of most flowering plants, that nourish the embryo. Endosperm plays a critical role in human nutrition and health, accounting for more than 75 percent of the world’s food supply, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). That’s because cereal crops like corn, rice and wheat – some of the most widely produced crops in the world – are harvested for their grains, which are mostly endosperm."

 

See full press release on the PHHI web site for more details on their newest researcher.

http://plantsforhumanhealth.ncsu.edu/

 

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Butterfly bushes, redbud recognized | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU

Butterfly bushes, redbud recognized | CALS News Center  | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Dr. Dennis Werner's plant breeding accomplishments were recognized at the international Plantarium plant show in the Netherlands.

 

The show attracted 320 exhibitors and more than 17,000 visitors. A  buddleia Dr. Werner developed, called Lilac Chip, won the Color My World Award. The award is based on a vote by show attendees and that Lilac Chip was judged the best at the show in the last 10 years.

 

In addition, a weeping redbud he developed, called Ruby Falls, won a silver medal, while another buddleia, called Ice Chip in the US & White Chip in Europe, won a bronze medal.

 

Like many of his recent releases, these plants are dwarfs, smaller than plants typically available, which can literally take over a small garden.

 

More of Dr. Werner's creations are discussed in the article.

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Small Flock Egg Production Field Day Sept. 19, 2012

Small Flock Egg Production Field Day Sept. 19, 2012 | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

The Small Flock Field Day, which focuses on small scale egg production in range setting, will be held Sept. 19, 2012, at the Center for Environmental Farming Systems (CDFS), Cherry Research Farm, Goldsboro, NC.

 

Everyone is welcome. Join us!

 

The program is here:

http://tinyurl.com/8bkmtyu

 

 

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Congratulations to Michael Simone-Finstrom for NIFA Postdoctoral Fellowship to study honey bees

Congratulations to Michael Simone-Finstrom for NIFA Postdoctoral Fellowship to study honey bees | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

The project integrates Dr. Simone-Finstrom's research paradigm with new experimental methods including instrumental insemination and RNAi technologies to explore "social immunity" in honey bees.

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Selecting optimum wheat seeding rate no easy task | Grains | Content from Southeast Farm Press

Selecting optimum wheat seeding rate no easy task | Grains | Content from Southeast Farm Press | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
North Carolina State University Small Grains Specialist Randy Weisz recently showed a group of grain growers a series of large wheat plots planted at seeding rates ranging from 1.1 million seed per acre all the way up to 2 million seed per acre.

 

He explains how growers can optimize yield by using an efficient planting density, which reduces unnecessary seed cost. He suggests using a simple new tool from The North Carolina Grain Growers Association. The recently developed tool is a simple calculator/slide rule that will make that conversion for the grower. “It’s a neat little tool that is easy to use to convert seed per acre to pounds of seed per acre,” Weisz says.

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Report: Animal production can grow sustainably | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU

Report: Animal production can grow sustainably | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NCSU | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Economist, Dr. Kelly Zering chairs committee issuing new Cast report titled:

 

Water and Land Issues Associated with Animal Agriculture: A U.S. Perspective

 

Free full text download here:

 

http://www.cast-science.org/publications/?water_and_land_issues_associated_with_animal_agriculture_a_us_perspective&show=product&productID=261302

 

 

 

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NC State News :: Unexpected Finding Shows Climate Change Complexities in Soil

NC State News :: Unexpected Finding Shows Climate Change Complexities in Soil | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Scientists have assumed that elevated CO2 would stimulate the beneficial plant root fungi, arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF), to sequester carbon in the soil.

 

This study challenges that assumption, and predictions based upon it, of carbon balance in future climate change. USDA funded the study.

 

Drs. H. David Shew (Plant Pathology) & Thomas Rufty (Crop Science) co-authored with Drs. Fitz Booker & Kent Burkey, of CALS & the USDA Agriculture Research Service. The first author is former NC State graduate student, Lei Cheng; and postdoctoral researchers Cong Tu & Lishi Zhou also co-authored.

 

The article appears in Science for 31 August 2012: Vol. 337 no. 6098 pp. 1084-1087
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1224304

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Join Us for the 21st Annual CALS Tailgate!

Join Us for the 21st Annual CALS Tailgate! | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Tailgate is the largest single Alumni event held at NCSU and the largest single event in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. CALS Tailgate is much more than a [BBQ] meal before the NC State football game

 

It is a showcase for the College's academic, research & extension mission, packed around fun events like a silent auction, live band, departmental displays, children's games, great food, fun and friendship!

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A look at the economic impact of honeybees - Triangle Business Journal

A look at the economic impact of honeybees - Triangle Business Journal | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Not everyone associates honeybees directly with the economy, but honeybee pollination...
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Turf War :: North Carolina State University Bulletin

Turf War :: North Carolina State University Bulletin | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

CALS researhcers Casey Reynolds, Grady Miller & Tom Rufty find that turfgrass components can affect grass photosynthesis and health. Research may lead to paints which are safer for the plants.

 Read the new paper in Crop Science:
http://dx.doi.org/10.2135/cropsci2012.01.0059

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