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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Irish Potato Famine-Causing Pathogen Even More Virulent Now

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Irish Potato Famine-Causing Pathogen Even More Virulent Now | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, July 18, 2013 4:23 PM

The plant pathogen that caused the Irish potato famine in the 1840s lives on today with a different genetic blueprint and an even larger arsenal of weaponry to harm and kill plants.

In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, North Carolina State University plant pathologist Jean Ristaino and colleagues Mike Martin and Tom Gilbert from the University of Copenhagen compared the genomes, or sets of all genes, of five 19th century strains of the Phytophthora infestans pathogen with modern strains of the pathogen, which still wreaks havoc on potatoes and tomatoes.

The researchers found that the genes in historical plant samples collected in Belgium in 1845 as well as other samples collected from varied European locales in the late 1870s and 1880s were quite different from modern-day P. infestans genes, including some genes in modern plants that make the pathogen more virulent than the historical strains.

 

Read more | http://news.ncsu.edu/releases/mk-ristaino-infestans-2013/

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Genomics students contribute to collaborative, computerized effort to build better blueberries

Genomics students contribute to collaborative, computerized effort to build better blueberries | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Nine students who are involved in a multi-institutional effort to produce better blueberries only see the fruit as codes, symbols, numbers and letters on computer screens, rather than the nutritional, sweet treat they love.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Genomics students contribute to collaborative computerized effort to build better blueberries | Davidson students join an undergraduate project to annotate the blueberry genome. The project includes Lenoir Rhyne College, CALS, and the NC Research Campus (NCRC) at Kannapolis and is funded by the NC Biotech Center. The goal is to breed berries which are larger, tastier, and disease-resistant. The project is run by Dr. Allan Brown of the Plants for Human Health Institute at the NCRC.  |  Read more: http://tinyurl.com/aktc9gf

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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » ‘Gold Standard’ Cotton Genome Sequenced

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » ‘Gold Standard’ Cotton Genome Sequenced | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"An international consortium with representatives from most of the world’s major cotton-producing countries, led by Regents Professor Andrew Paterson of the University of Georgia and including Candace Haigler, a North Carolina State University professor of crop science and plant biology, has described the first ‘gold-standard’ genome sequence for cotton. Published today in Nature, this is the culmination of a more than 20-year effort in the analysis of cotton genes, chromosomes and their evolution."

 

Read the paper in Nature here:

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v492/n7429/full/nature11798.html\

 

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Ecuadorian President Visits, Pursues Knowledge and Collaboration with NC Research Campus

Ecuadorian President Visits, Pursues Knowledge and Collaboration with NC Research Campus | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

President Rafael Correa of the Republic of Ecuador and a delegation of ministers spent Tuesday touring each of the 16 university and corporate research programs at the NC Research Campus (NCRC) in Kannapolis.   President Correa and his delegation of over 60 Ecuadorian government officials met with David H. Murdock, founder of the NCRC and toured on campus, and the campus’ lead scientists.

 

President Correa is looking at the research, scientific instrumentation and collaborative environment of the NCRC as a model to implement in the development of Yachay, a planned city of science and technology being built in Ecuador’s northern province of Imbabura.

 

“Amazing! Outstanding!” said President Correa. “A learning experience for us. We are building in our country a planned city of knowledge, (and) we want to learn from your experience. This (Yachay) is the biggest project in Ecuadorian history. We are (changing) from a traditional to a knowledge-based economy.”

 

NCRC web site:

http://www.ncresearchcampus.net/

 

web site for the Plants for Human Health Institute at the NCRC

http://plantsforhumanhealth.ncsu.edu/

 

The PHHI focuses on nutrition, agriculture and health.

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Peach genome offers insights into breeding strategies for biofuels crops

Peach genome offers insights into breeding strategies for biofuels crops | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Rapidly growing trees like poplars and willows are candidate "biofuel crops" from which it is expected that cellulosic ethanol and higher energy content fuels can be efficiently extracted.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Peach Genome Offers Insights Into Breeding Strategies for Biofuels Crops: Dr. Bryon Sosinski of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University is part of the research team which has sequenced Prunus persica, a close relative of potential biofuel crops, poplar and willow. The new sequence data is expected to be helpful in breeding such crops. Read more | http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/03/130324152303.htm

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Tradition meets innovation in CALS scientist’s tomato breeding efforts | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agricultu...

Tradition meets innovation in CALS scientist’s tomato breeding efforts | CALS News Center | News from the College of Agricultu... | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State University

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Combining new tools, such as marker-assisted selection (MAS) with time-honored methods, Dr. Dilip Panthee carries on NCSU’s strong tradition in plant breeding, developing hardier, higher-yielding plants for NC's $30B/year tomato industry.

 

NCSU's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) has the nation’s largest university plant breeding program; and Pantheeproudly follows in the footsteps of Dr. Randy Gardner, a retired breeder credited with developing the cultivars used on some 60-75% of the vine-ripe tomatoes grown in the Eastern US.

 

Working at the Mt. Horticultural Crops Research & Extension Center in Mills River, Panthee focuses on developing tomato breeding lines and cultivars with three traits: disease resistance, fruit quality and stress tolerance. That’s because, in a survey he conducted, these three traits were the ones NC  growers reported needing the most.

 

Read more about our tomato breeding program:

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/agcomm/news-center/?p=21430

 

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/tomato/

 

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/achievement/tomato_breeding.htm

 

Some of our releases:

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/fletcher/programs/tomato/publications.html

 

 

 

 

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Statistician links medicine, genetics in lecture at Elon | The Pendulum

Statistician links medicine, genetics in lecture at Elon | The Pendulum | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Marie Davidian, a statistics professor at North Carolina State University, connected the seemingly unrelated topics of statistics and the Human Genome Project by explaining their role in determining the best ...
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