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Comb Your Antennae (Science Magazine: May Require Subscription)

Comb Your Antennae (Science Magazine: May Require Subscription) | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Coby Schal and postdoctoral researchers, Dr. Katalin Boroczky and Dr. Ayako Wada-Katsuma ask why cockroaches groom and find that the fastidious behavior sharpens their senses. The discovery may have implications for pest control.

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Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW

Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Video: Cleanliness Is Next to Cockroaches - ScienceNOW
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Video: Cleanliness is next to cockroaches (Science NOW on YouTube) Research team from the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NCSU and Russia finds that fastidious insect grooming enhances sensory performance. Watch the delicate operation to learn more | http://news.sciencemag.org/sciencenow/2013/02/video-cleanliness-is-next-to-coc.html|
| paper in PNAS | http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110

 

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RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com

RALEIGH: N.C. State researchers say roach grooming could lead to new pest controls | Health | NewsObserver.com | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A paper published by researchers at N.C. State University found cockroach grooming habits may help developers of insecticide products find better ways of controlling pests.
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Dr. Coby Schal, entomologist in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences coauthored the study with authors were Dale Batchelor of NCSU’s Analytical Instrumentation Facility & Marianna Zhukovskaya, Russian Academy of Sciences.

 

Read the paper in PNAS, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/02/04/2656341/nc-state-researchers-say-roach.html#storylink=misearch#storylink=cpy
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Scientists See Insect Outbreaks From Space

Scientists See Insect Outbreaks From Space | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
A new tool uses satellite imagery to help researchers track small disturbances such as bug infestations, which may increase in scope as climate changes
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Watch the stunning video of a LandTrendr visualization of the Pacific Northwest and see the colors change as the mountain pine beetle infestation encroaches on the healthy forest.

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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 5, 2013 2:41 PM

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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What Does It Take to Fool a Snake? Send in the Robot

What Does It Take to Fool a Snake? Send in the Robot | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
Trying to dupe real animals with mechanical ones is an increasingly popular methodology among biologists in order to study wildlife.
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NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Researchers Find Asian Needle Ants Displacing Other Aggressive Invaders

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Researchers Find Asian Needle Ants Displacing Other Aggressive Invaders | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Photo of Asian needle ant stinging a termite courtesy of Benoit Guenard.

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

CALS researchers find that one of the most aggressive invasive ant species in the US, the Argentine ant, appears to have met its match in the Asian needle ant. Former NC State PhD student Dr. Eleanor Spicer Rice & Dr. Jules Silverman, Entomology, published their findings in PLoS One:

 

http://scienceblog.com/59643/asian-needle-ants-displacing-other-aggressive-invaders/ ;

 

http://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0056281

 

 

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‘From crops to cows to cream’: Milking center dedication highlights N.C. State’s innovative approach to dairy science and education

‘From crops to cows to cream’: Milking center dedication highlights N.C. State’s innovative approach to dairy science and education | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
News from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at NC State
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

"A new N.C. State University milking center was cause for celebration for North Carolina’s dairy industry Friday Nov. 9. More than 100 people came out to view the new building designed to enhance the university’s teaching, research and extension programs in both food and animal sciences.

 

"The center includes milking stalls where about 150 cows are milked twice a day, producing 1,000 gallons a day of milk that’s trucked to Schaub Hall and used in Howling Cow ice cream and other dairy products.

 

"The center’s dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Lake Wheeler Road Field Laboratory’s Dairy Educational Unit mark an important milestone in the development of a vertically integrated dairy enterprise system that encompasses not just the dairy farm unit but also the Schaub Hall Dairy Pilot Plant."

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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, February 6, 2013 3:34 PM

"A new N.C. State University milking center was cause for celebration for North Carolina’s dairy industry Friday Nov. 9. More than 100 people came out to view the new building designed to enhance the university’s teaching, research and extension programs in both food and animal sciences.

 

The center includes milking stalls where about 150 cows are milked twice a day, producing 1,000 gallons a day of milk that’s trucked to Schaub Hall and used in Howling Cow ice cream and other dairy products.

 

The center’s dedication and ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Lake Wheeler Road Field Laboratory’s Dairy Educational Unit mark an important milestone in the development of a vertically integrated dairy enterprise system that encompasses not just the dairy farm unit but also the Schaub Hall Dairy Pilot Plant."

 

 

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Parasitic fly spotted in honeybees, causes workers to abandon colonies : Not Exactly Rocket Science

Parasitic fly spotted in honeybees, causes workers to abandon colonies : Not Exactly Rocket Science | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Andrew Core of San Francisco State Univ. has discovered another possible contributor to honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), which threatens crop pollination and food security: a tiny parasitic fly, Apocephalus borealis, which oviposits in the bee's abdomen where the eggs hatch and the larvae eventually kill the host bee. The parasitic fly usually attacks bumblebees; but Dr. Core has found it also reproduces in honeybees, causing them to become confused and wander from the hive at abnormal times, such during the night.

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ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW

ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
ScienceShot: How an Aphid Is Like a Cat - ScienceNOW
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NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened

NC State News and Information » Grooming Helps Insects Keep Their Senses Sharpened | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Like a self-absorbed teenager, insects spend a lot of time grooming.

 

In a study that delves into the mechanisms behind this common function, North Carolina State University researchers show that insect grooming – specifically, antennal cleaning – removes both environmental pollutants and chemicals produced by the insects themselves.

 

The findings, published online this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that grooming helps insects maintain acute olfactory senses that are responsible for a host of functions, including finding food, sensing danger and even locating a suitable mate.

 

The findings could also explain why certain types of insecticides work more effectively than others, leading to new pesticides.

 

Read the paper in PNAS here:

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/01/29/1212466110.abstract

 

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Humans Aren’t the Only Animals That Hold Elections

Humans Aren’t the Only Animals That Hold Elections | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

 

Biologist, Dr. Rob Dunn of the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences (CALS) at NC State University blogs on lessons humans might draw from animals:

"One of my racquetball buddies, Dave Tarpy [CALS honey bee specialist] ... studies honeybees decisions. Tarpy was a postdoctoral researcher with Tom Seeley and so has learned Seeley’s democracy-documenting ways, but Tarpy is more interested in queens than Seeley is. How do these solitary leaders become who they are? What allows some queens to succeed over others when there is a power vacuum in the hive?"

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