Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service
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Why Are Honeybees Dying?

Why Are Honeybees Dying? | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
The past year has been a bad one for America's honeybees, with commercial beekeepers reporting hive losses of up to 50 percent. Some blame the mysterious
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CALS Research, NCSU's curator insight, June 28, 2013 4:22 PM

CALS apiculturist, Dr. David Tarpy joins Dick Rogers, manager of Bayer CropScience's Bee Care Center (under construction in RTP) & Jeffrey Lee, who owns Lee's Bees in Mebane, NC, to discuss the issue. Read more | http://wunc.org/post/why-are-hon

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Mount Airy News - Researchers still seeking to understand Colony Collapse Disorder

Mount Airy News - Researchers still seeking to understand Colony Collapse Disorder | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it

Dr. David Tarpy, apiculture specialist in the College of Agriculture & Life Sciences at NC State University, comments Colony Collapse Disorder, which threatens bee-pollinated crops, the controversy surrounding the role of pesticides in the phenomenon, and his pollinator research program.

 

CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

NC Honeybee Research Consortium

http://www.ncsu.edu/project/honey_bee_res/

 

Dr. Tarpy's web site

http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/entomology/tarpy

 

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Parasitic fly spotted in honeybees, causes workers to abandon colonies : Not Exactly Rocket Science

Parasitic fly spotted in honeybees, causes workers to abandon colonies : Not Exactly Rocket Science | Research from the NC Agricultural Research Service | Scoop.it
CALS Research, NCSU's insight:

Andrew Core of San Francisco State Univ. has discovered another possible contributor to honeybee Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), which threatens crop pollination and food security: a tiny parasitic fly, Apocephalus borealis, which oviposits in the bee's abdomen where the eggs hatch and the larvae eventually kill the host bee. The parasitic fly usually attacks bumblebees; but Dr. Core has found it also reproduces in honeybees, causing them to become confused and wander from the hive at abnormal times, such during the night.

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