Research Development
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Research Development
Research development is a set of strategic, proactive, catalytic, and capacity-building activities designed to facilitate individual faculty members, teams of researchers, and central research administrations in attracting extramural research funding, creating relationships, and developing and implementing strategies that increase institutional competitiveness.[http://www.nordp.org/about-us]
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Compliance Matrix: Critical tool for Proposal Development. No more "But that information in in the proposal!"

TheProposalGuru | Government
Marilyn Korhonen's insight:

A Compliance Matrix can be used by the writing team to ensure all requirements are met. In some cases, it can be included as an attachment; but carefully check guidelines. The following is an example of a basic compliance matrix. They range from simple checklists to complex charts.

 

RFPThe Jones Group ProposalRequirementSectionPage SectionPageProvide animal husbandry and IACUC administrative services at three USAMRICD buildings1.1.14 1.2.110Provide animal husbandry and IACUC administrative services at two USAPHC (Prov) buildings1.1.14 1.2.111Work in all buildings without restrictions1.1.14 1.2.13Provide support in compliance with listing in Appendix 11.1.15 1.4.313

 

In this example, the left-hand column briefly describes the requirements while the section and page columns identify where it is located in the RFP.  The two columns to the right identify the sections and pages where the proposal addresses the RFP requirement.

 

- See more at: http://www.theproposalguru.com/developing-a-compliance-matrix/#sthash.EYbgxqJ3.dpuf

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Study: Marriage becoming a distinctive social institution marking US middle-class status.

Study: Marriage becoming a distinctive social institution marking US middle-class status. | Research Development | Scoop.it
The decline and disappearance of stable, unionized full-time jobs with health insurance and pensions for people who lack a college degree has had profound effects on working-class Americans who now are less likely to get married, stay married and...
Marilyn Korhonen's insight:

Recent research, "Intimate Inequalities: Love and Work in a Post-Industrial Landscape," finds he decline and disappearance of stable, unionized full-time jobs with health insurance and pensions for people who lack a college degree has had profound effects on working-class Americans who now are less likely to get married, stay married and have their children within marriage than those with college degrees.

 

The researchers found, generally, that educated middle-class workers are better able to recover from the destabilizing effects of insecure work than the working class, and therefore can seek and find stability in relationships.

 

"Working-class people with insecure work and few resources, little stability and no ability to plan for a foreseeable future become concerned with their own survival and often become unable to imagine being able to provide materially and emotionally for others. Insecure work changes peoples' non-work lives."

 

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Researchers slow light to a crawl in liquid crystal matrix

Researchers slow light to a crawl in liquid crystal matrix | Research Development | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Light traveling in a vacuum is the Universe's ultimate speed demon, racing along at approximately 300,000 kilometers per second. Now scientists have found an effective new way to put a speed bump in light's path.
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The new approach to manipulating light uses little power, does not require an external electrical field, and operates at room temperature, making it more practical than many other slow light experiments. Putting the brakes on light can help scientists compare the characteristics of different light pulses more easily, which in turn can help them build highly sensitive instruments to measure extremely slow speeds and small movements. In a paper in Optics Letters, researchers describe an instrument that uses slow light to measure speeds less than one trillionth of a meter per second.

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"Accident" in lab results in powdered and dry form of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) with remarkable water-binding properties

"Accident" in lab results in powdered and dry form of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) with remarkable water-binding properties | Research Development | Scoop.it
Researchers in Uppsala, Sweden accidentally left a reaction running over the weekend and ended up resolving a century-old chemistry problem.
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Researchers in Uppsala, Sweden accidentally left a reaction running over the weekend and modified a procedure dating back to 1908 to make a powdered and dry form of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3) with remarkable water-binding properties, which they dubbed Upsalite. As early as 1820, people started to search for lower-temperature routes to make dry MgCO3, but none have successfully yielded pure product until now. This is why Upsalite has been described as an "impossible material". Pure, dry MgCO3, which is void of almost any water molecules. Upsalite promises to find applications in everything from humidity control at home to chemical manufacturing in industry.

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Researchers use circulation models, genetics to track 'lost years' of turtles

Researchers use circulation models, genetics to track 'lost years' of turtles | Research Development | Scoop.it
When green turtles toddle out to the ocean after hatching from eggs at sandy beaches they more or less disappear from view and aren't seen again for several years until they show up as juveniles at coastal foraging areas.
Marilyn Korhonen's insight:

Researchers from Oregon State University and the City University of New York used sophisticated ocean circulation models to trace the likely route of baby green turtles from known nesting sites once they entered the water. They also identified known locations of foraging sites where the turtles reappeared as juveniles, and went backwards – tracing where they most likely arrived via currents. 


The researchers simulated the dispersal of turtles from each of 29 separate locations in portions of the southern Caribbean, the Sargasso Sea, and portions of the South Atlantic Ocean and the West Indian Ocean and identified "hot spots" throughout these basins where computer models suggest that virtual turtles would be densely aggregated. They estimate the fewest number of turtles would be located in the open ocean along the equator between South America and central Africa.

 

Based on the models, it appears that turtles from many populations would circumnavigate the Atlantic Ocean basin. "Backtracking" simulations revealed that numerous foraging grounds were predicted to have turtles arrive from the North Atlantic, South Atlantic and Southwest Indian oceans. Thus, a high degree of connectivity among populations appears likely based on circulation patterns at the ocean surface.

 

The next step in the research might be for turtle biologists throughout the Atlantic Ocean basin to "ground truth" the model by looking for young turtles in those hotspots. Knowing more about their early life history and migration routes could help in managing the population, he said.

 

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ProQuest Tunes Up Pivot To Make Winning University Grants More Efficient - CBS Detroit

ProQuest Tunes Up Pivot To Make Winning University Grants More Efficient - CBS Detroit | Research Development | Scoop.it
ProQuest's innovative Pivot service, a web-based resource that identifies active sources of funding and matches them with researchers in one step, has enhanced its popular
Marilyn Korhonen's insight:

Pivot is available to all OU faculty and other researchers to find funding information and collaborators. CRPDE is available to introduce these resources to OU researchers and faculty.

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Novus Light Today - Business - NSF Grant Launches Baker College Photonics and Laser Program

Novus Light Today - Business - NSF Grant Launches Baker College Photonics and Laser Program | Research Development | Scoop.it
Baker College of Flint has received nearly 200,000 in a grant from the National Science Foundation NSF that fast-forwards the states first photonics and laser technology associate degree program being launched fall quarter.
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An NSF Advanced Technological Education (ATE) program grant will enable Baker College of Flint has to launch the state’s first photonics and laser technology associate degree program starting next month. ATF supports efforts to improve the knowledge and skills of technicians who work in high technology fields.

 

NSF funds will help create Baker’s photonics program, advance and enlarge Baker’s photonics lab, educate the first group of students, and develop outreach programs that encourage high school students to consider careers in photonics. The result will be a model for other colleges interested in photonics nationwide.

 

According to the National Center for Optics and Photonics Education (OP-TEC), approximately 30 US colleges offering photonics instruction are estimated to meet about one-third of the industry’s projected demand of 800 new photonics technicians each year through 2017.

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Writing Scientific Proposals in Many Easy Steps | Live Granades

Writing Scientific Proposals in Many Easy Steps | Live Granades | Research Development | Scoop.it
If you're a scientist or engineer, you've got a pretty good chance of having to write a scientific proposal. If you're an academic scientist or engineer, your
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I had to post this one for the image!

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The Baby Penalty

The Baby Penalty | Research Development | Scoop.it
A new book explores the price that women in academe pay, and men don't, for having children.
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These researchers found that women pay a "baby penalty" over the course of their academic careers—from the uncertain graduate-school years to the pressure cooker of tenure, through the long midcareer march, and finally to retirement.


Among other sources, the study used findings from the National Science Foundation survey that has tracked a large sample of Ph.D.'s (more than 160,000) from 1973 onward, and several other large surveys and interviews focusing on graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and faculty members at the University of California.


What can we do to alleviate the "Baby Penalty"? Feel free to email me directly (mkorhonen at ou dot edu)

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Top 5 social media platforms for research development

Top 5 social media platforms for research development | Research Development | Scoop.it
Social media outlets are becoming essential for academia, not just for the promotion of research but for research development as well. Andy Miah provides an overview of his top picks for the social...
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Facebook ... LinkedIn ... Pinterest ... Google ... Twitter ... Mendeley

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Study looks beyond averages to track variability in a bacterial population

Study looks beyond averages to track variability in a bacterial population | Research Development | Scoop.it
As a result of the variable nature of gene expression, genetically identical cells inhabiting the same environment can vary significantly in their numbers of key enzymes, which in turn results in strikingly different cellular behaviors.
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Communication is critical to the success of research development and relevance | Inside Higher Ed

Communication is critical to the success of research development and relevance | Inside Higher Ed | Research Development | Scoop.it
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To become more intellectually rigorous, the field must respond to the growing practical pressures to become more relevant to society.To become more relevant and helpful to those beyond the academy, the field must become more coherent and rigorous.To meet its vaunted commitment to interdisciplinarity, communication must carefully define and effectively articulate a distinctive disciplinary core.The field whose domain is communication has not effectively communicated its own uniqueness and value to others.To become more rigorous, the field must recognize the practical pressures and opportunities it faces and become more relevant to society. To become more relevant, the field must become more rigorous.



Read more: http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2013/07/29/essay-state-communications-scholarship#ixzz2aYkXsjHo ;
Inside Higher Ed 

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Engaging the Whole Child: The Neuroscience of Joyful Education

Engaging the Whole Child: The Neuroscience of Joyful Education | Research Development | Scoop.it

Brain research tells us that when the fun stops, learning often stops too.

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Marilyn Korhonen's curator insight, July 30, 2013 3:21 PM

Neuroimaging and neurochemical research support an education model in which stress and anxiety are not pervasive (Chugani, 1998; Pawlak, Magarinos, Melchor, McEwan, & Strickland, 2003). This research suggests that superior learning takes place when classroom experiences are enjoyable and relevant to students' lives, interests, and experiences.

Many education theorists (Dulay & Burt, 1977; Krashen, 1982) have proposed that students retain what they learn when the learning is associated with strong positive emotion. Cognitive psychology studies provide clinical evidence that stress, boredom, confusion, low motivation, and anxiety can individually, and more profoundly in combination, interfere with learning (Christianson, 1992).

 

Neuroimaging and measurement of brain chemicals (neurotransmitters) show us what happens in the brain during stressful emotional states. By reading glucose or oxygen use and blood flow, positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) indicate activity in identifiable regions of the brain. These scans demonstrate that under stressful conditions information is blocked from entering the brain's areas of higher cognitive memory consolidation and storage. In other words, when stress activates the brain's affective filters, information flow to the higher cognitive networks is limited and the learning process grinds to a halt.

 

Neuroimaging and electroencephalography (EEG) brain mapping of subjects in the process of learning new information reveal that the most active areas of the brain when new sensory information is received are the somatosensory cortex areas. Input from each individual sense (hearing, touch, taste, vision, smell) is delivered to these areas and then matched with previously stored related memories.

For example, the brain appears to link new words about cars with previously stored data in the category of transportation. Simultaneously, the limbic system, comprising parts of the temporal lobe, hippocampus, amygdala, and prefrontal cortex (front part of the frontal lobe), adds emotional significance to the information (sour flavor is tasty in lemon sherbet but unpleasant in spoiled juice). Such relational memories appear to enhance storage of the new information in long-term memory (Andreasen et al., 1999).

 

Mapping studies of the electrical activity (EEG or brain waves) and neuroimaging show the synchronization of brain activity as information passes from the somatosensory cortex areas to the limbic system (Andreasen et al., 1999). For example, bursts of brain activity from the somatosensory cortex are followed milliseconds later by bursts of electrical activity in the hippocampus, amygdala, and then the other parts of the limbic system (Sowell et al., 2003). This enables us to evaluate which strategies either stimulate or impede communication among the various parts of the brain (Shadmehr & Holcomb, 1997).

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Unmanned Systems (Drones) Can Help With Twister Science : NPR

Unmanned Systems (Drones) Can Help With Twister Science : NPR | Research Development | Scoop.it
To understand how and why tornadoes form, some researchers are taking to the skies with small unmanned aircraft. The drones, outfitted with an array of sensors, can provide valuable data about the storms, and don't require people to be in harm's way.
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Armed with with mobile science laboratories, rushing toward storms armed with research equipment and weather-sensing probes, UAS can help in battle to more effectively predict severe weather events.

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Flatworms lose their heads but not their memories: Study finds memories stored outside the brain

Flatworms lose their heads but not their memories: Study finds memories stored outside the brain | Research Development | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Tufts University biologists using new, automated training and testing techniques have found that planarian flatworms store memory outside their brains and, if their heads are removed, can apparently imprint these memories on their new...
Marilyn Korhonen's insight:

As bioengineering and biomedicine advance, there's a great need to better understand the dynamics of memory and the brain-body interface. 


Biologists help unlock the secrets of how memories can be encoded in living tissues using new, automated training and testing techniques.  Journal of Experimental Biology reports researchers have found that planarian flatworms store memory outside their brains and, if their heads are removed, can apparently imprint these memories on their new brains during regeneration.

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Two strains of bacteria team up, thrive on limited resources

Two strains of bacteria team up, thrive on limited resources | Research Development | Scoop.it
In a discovery that further demonstrates just how unexpected and unusual nature can be, scientists have found two strains of bacteria whose symbiotic relationship is unlike anything seen before.
Marilyn Korhonen's insight:

Long, thin, hairlike Thioploca (meaning "sulfur braids" in Spanish) trichomes form chains down into marine sediment, which tiny Anammox cells ride down like an elevator. At the bottom, the Anammox cells consume nitrite and ammonium, or "fixed" nitrogen, the waste products of the Thioploca.

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Marilyn Korhonen's curator insight, August 16, 2013 9:56 AM

Nitrogen is a crucial building block of life, a prerequisite for photosynthesis. While nitrogen is present in abundance in the Earth's atmosphere, to be useful for most living organisms, the nonreactive atmospheric di-nitrogen gas that diffuses into the ocean from the air must be converted into the biologically available "fixed" forms ammonium, nitrate and nitrite by specialized organisms called nitrogen fixers. Other organisms use up this fixed nitrogen and convert it back to di-nitrogen gas.

This photo shows a sample of giant bacteria Thioploca retrieved from the researchers research cruise in the Pacific. Credit: Loreto de Brabrandere

 

Living together in the mud beneath areas of high plant productivity, Thioploca and Anammox intensify this part of the nitrogen cycle.

 

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Small-molecule solar cells get 50% increase in efficiency with optical spacer

Small-molecule solar cells get 50% increase in efficiency with optical spacer | Research Development | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —In the world of organic solar cells, polymer-based devices may currently be at the top, but other organic materials such as "small molecules" also prove to be promising.
Marilyn Korhonen's insight:

A new study published in Nano Letters reports ability to increase the efficiency of one type of small-molecule organic solar cell from 6.02% to 8.94% simply by tuning the thickness of the active layer and inserting an optical spacer between the active layer and an electrode.  Small-molecule organic solar cells have several advantages over organic polymer solar cells: relatively simple synthesis, high charge carrier mobility, similarly sized particles (monodispersity), and better reproducibility, among others. However, small-molecule solar cells have so far achieved top efficiencies of about 8%, lagging somewhat behind the best polymer devices.

Findings show small-molecule solar cells have the potential to compete with their polymer counterparts, which have efficiencies approaching 10%.

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Dragonflies can see by switching 'on' and 'off'

Dragonflies can see by switching 'on' and 'off' | Research Development | Scoop.it
(Phys.org) —Researchers at the University of Adelaide have discovered a novel and complex visual circuit in a dragonfly's brain that could one day help to improve vision systems for robots.
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Dr Steven Wiederman and Associate Professor David O'Carroll from the University's Centre for Neuroscience Research have been studying the underlying processes of insect vision and applying that knowledge in robotics and artificial vision systems.

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Insider's tips on preparing the NSF Annual Report for Grants

Insider's tips on preparing the NSF Annual Report for Grants | Research Development | Scoop.it
If you were lucky to get funded in the recent past, you may have an NSF annual report due now or due soon.  Here is some advice on writing those reports. First, they are important because with thes...
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It always helps to learn from someone who has been through the experience. This blog post gives specific guidance and an outline. 

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NASA Introduces New Blueprint for Transforming Global Aviation

NASA Introduces New Blueprint for Transforming Global Aviation | Research Development | Scoop.it
NASA responds to global events changing aviation with a strategy that puts "vision" back in aeronautics research.
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Summary of NASA’s New Blueprint for Transforming Global Aviation

NASA planners started with global trends that might relate to aviation, concentrating on economics, technology and the environment; such as, the Asia-Pacific region is seeing rapid economic growth marked by increased urbanization and a growing middle class, changes that will create millions of potential new customers of aviation services. Other trends include the quickening pace at which revolutionary technology is invented and then widely adopted, as well as the ongoing environmental concerns related to the climate and availability of energy sources.

Informed by these emerging global trends, NASA identified three "mega-drivers" expected to shape aviation within the next 20 to 40 years.

Relates to the expected growth in demand for all air services across the planet. How must aviation change so it can fly enough to meet the worldwide demand every day, routinely and safely?Deals with global climate issues, resources and energy. How can aviation's impact on the environment be lessened? And are plentiful but significantly less expensive sources of energy available?Involves incorporating new technology into aviation. How can the aviation community best take advantage of the incredible advances being made in areas not usually tied to aeronautics, such as power storage and robotics?

Six areas of research were identified in the vision that will allow NASA to best deploy its resources and prioritize its goals:

Safe, efficient growth in global operations that will enable the Next Generation Air Transportation System in the United States by 2035 and safely expand capacity of the global airspace system to accommodate growth in air traffic.Innovation in commercial supersonic aircraft that will provide data for a low level sonic boom standard that could lead to permission for supersonic flight over land.Ultra-efficient commercial transports that will pioneer technologies for future generations of commercial transports that simultaneously reduce noise, fuel use and emissions.Transition to low-carbon propulsion that will enable industry to move toward and adopt use of low-carbon fuels and alternative propulsion systems.Real-time, system-wide safety assurance in which tools are developed for use in creating a prototype of an integrated safety monitoring and assurance system that can detect, predict and prevent safety problems in real time.Assured autonomy for aviation transformation that will enable the utilization of higher levels of automation and autonomy across the aviation system, particularly as it relates to unmanned aerial systems and remotely piloted vehicles.
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Resist the “Us vs. Them” Mindset

Resist the “Us vs. Them” Mindset | Research Development | Scoop.it
I’ve spoken with many leaders who have to manage rival teams within an organization. Cliques and tribes can torpedo a project – or be the downfall of a company. I spoke with IMD professor
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“Proactive bonding is a mindset. You actively look for the common goal between yourself and the other person or team. This helps eliminate any built-in adversarial filter you bring to a meeting or project.


It stops that inner-dialogue of tribal seeking. The brain is looking for tribal behavior: you’re like my tribe or you're different from my tribe. You're a friend or an enemy. It's you or us. Looking for the common goal, or a positive outcome, can also help you feel open minded and calm – an ideal state for finding creative solutions.

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What Motivates Prospective Graduate Students - Personal Achievers more likely to pursue PhD

Principal Analyst Heather O'Leary explains what motivates prospective graduate students and how colleges and universities should address their wants and need...
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Quick overview by Eduventures.

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New research shows social monogamy evolved as result of competition

New research shows social monogamy evolved as result of competition | Research Development | Scoop.it
Social monogamy, where one breeding female and one breeding male are closely associated with each other over several breeding seasons, appears to have evolved as a mating strategy, new research reveals.
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The comparative study, by University of Cambridge researchers Dieter Lukas and Tim Clutton-Brock, shows that the ancestral system for all mammalian groups is of females living in separate ranges with males defending overlapping territories, and that monogamy evolved where males were unable to monopolise and defend multiple females. The research is published in the journal Science.

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-social-monogamy-evolved-result-competition.html#jCp

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The Brave New World of Unmanned Vehicles | Emerging Tech | TechNewsWorld

The Brave New World of Unmanned Vehicles | Emerging Tech | TechNewsWorld | Research Development | Scoop.it
Remote-control vehicles once primarily inhabited the territory of hobbyists. People would take their planes out to a field on a Saturday afternoon and spin a few lazy circles in the sky.
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This is an important area of research and development and it will impact all of our lives soon. 

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Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation: Online tools accelerating earthquake-engineering progress

Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation: Online tools accelerating earthquake-engineering progress | Research Development | Scoop.it
A new study has found that online tools, access to experimental data and other services provided through 'cyberinfrastructure' are helping to accelerate progress in earthquake engineering and science.
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 The research is affiliated with the National Science Foundation's George E. Brown Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES), based at Purdue University. NEES includes 14 laboratories forearthquake engineering and tsunami research, tied together with cyberinfrastructure to provide information technology for the network.


Advancing Earthquake Engineering Research through Cyberinfrastructure , DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)ST.1943-541X.0000712

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2013-07-online-tools-earthquake-engineering.html#jCp

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