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Learning Theories: Double-Loop Learning

Learning Theories: Double-Loop Learning | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
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Learning Theories: Double-Loop Learning
by Steve Wheeler, Associate Professor, Plymouth Institute of Education
This is the second in my series of short blog posts on important theories of learning.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
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Library resources can save students time - Elgin Courier News

Library resources can save students time - Elgin Courier News | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Library resources can save students time
Elgin Courier News
STEM — science, technology, engineering and math — is a huge focus in education and the library has very cool science kits that can be checked out for 28 days.
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Library resources can save students time - Elgin Courier News

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The 10 Most Important Things That Students Actually Learn In College

The 10 Most Important Things That Students Actually Learn In College | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Here's what students say they actually learn in college. (There's more to #college than classroom instruction. What are students ACTUALLY learning in college? Lifelong skills.
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Social Media, Online Conversations and Ebola

Social Media, Online Conversations and Ebola | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

While CDC’s Ebola response efforts surge overseas to help stop the outbreak at its source, at home, CDC corrects misinformation and addresses public fear of a virus unknown to most Americans. Until August 2, 2014, Ebola had never presented on U.S. soil. That changed when two American Ebola patients arrived in the U.S. from Liberia within three days of each other. Concerns about Ebola quickly lit up social media, as people reacted to the news.  

CDC’s response to this initial and growing concern about the risks an Ebola outbreak poses here in the U.S. has been to work with the media to inform and correct misinformation in its reporting. Social media has also played a critical role in reaching health care workers and the public at large through targeted, credible messages. These messages and links to resources can help reduce uncertainty about the ability of the general population to manage any threat (real or perceived) related to Ebola. The following five CDC tactics on social media formed part of a broader risk communication plan:

Join the conversation where and when it’s occurring – Within the first week of the communication surge, CDC disseminated over 200 messages across social media platforms.  Quickly, CDC’s messages and visuals about Ebola and the outbreak became part of the public, online discourse.  Timely dissemination, social sharing, and the power of peer influences on social media meant our accurate information could enter the dialogue and help people manage their fears about Ebola.  In addition, CDC hosted a Twitter chat using hashtags #CDCchat and #Ebola to answer the public’s questions about the virus.  CDC disease detectives and infectious disease specialists were tweeting directly with the general public in what was CDC’s largest Twitter chat in history. Over 4,300 tweets and 2,300 unique participants took part.  The publicchat highlights were archived and shared across CDC social media channels the next day.

Address fears and misinformation – Ebola is a really scary disease, even for the most experienced CDC disease detectives.  Addressing the source of one’s fear -- not enough information, misinformation, risks -- at the source improves the chances that one’s fear will be managed and provides an opportunity for people to educate each other. Infographics have proved an effective way to explain how Ebola is spread (and not spread), and they have been CDC’s most shared multimedia content. Other key messages disseminated include educating the public about CDC’s role in global health security and explaining proven infectious disease prevention and control practices.

Use Plain Language – CDC’s social media communication efforts incorporate the principles of plain language.  Plain language allows CDC to build trust with audiences as well as an understanding of the problem and the public health response. One example of plain language in Ebola outbreak social media communications includes specifically naming body fluids (blood, vomit, diarrhea, urine, feces and semen) through which Ebola can be spread with direct contact.

Educate Health workers and prepare the U.S. health system – Other trusted sources of public information are our own healthcare providers.  CDC guidance for isolating and safely treating an Ebola patient was posted to cdc.gov and shared across CDC social media sites. At the end of the first week, on August 8th, CDC hosted a second Twitter chat for clinicians: What US hospitals need to know about Ebola and infection control. Targeted outreach to clinicians, health leaders, and health system influencers across social networks led to significant sharing of resources.  This chat included over 2,000 mentions from 800 unique participants with a potential reach of 37 million during the one-hour event.

Shift the Dialog – While outreach, monitoring and addressing misinformation formed a critical part of CDC’s social media communication efforts during the first week, assessing information gaps was also a priority. We know from our interactions on social media that there is strong interest in CDC’s disease detectives and real value in putting a human face on their work.  Social media is an ideal medium to highlight the work that CDC experts, health care professionals, and global public health partners do every day to prevent and control the spread of disease around the world.  CDC communicators began interviewing and posting profiles and stories from our disease detectives and other responders.  These are people just like the general population -- moms and dads, husbands, wives, sisters, brothers -- doing what they do to help protect and save lives.  That content on social media, their work and the stories of the lives being affected by Ebola, has been a game changer.  An outpouring of appreciation and support continues to grow out of the sharing of their experiences on social media.  

Receiving credible information at a fearful or uncertain time can help shift the internal and external dialogue.  Mandela said, “I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it.”  Perhaps it is not our job as communicators to make fear go away, but to help people manage fear; and in managing fear, we can then make space for compassion to enter the human heart.  Social media continues to play a big role in achieving this goal echoed by CDC Director, Dr. Tom Frieden, “We hope people’s fear of the unfamiliar does not overtake their compassion.”  The news of two American survivors, and indeed every survivor’s story in West Africa, is proof there is plenty of reason for hope and compassion and, until the outbreak is stopped, for triumph over our fear of Ebola.



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Social Media, Online Conversations and Ebola

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Public school students taking digital learning into real world - Calgary Herald

Public school students taking digital learning into real world - Calgary Herald | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Calgary Herald Public school students taking digital learning into real world Calgary Herald Calgary students “need to learn what's expected of them in the real world,” says Cathy Faber, superintendent of learning innovation and chief information...
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Informing The World's Illiterate Through a Mobile Device - Huffington Post (blog)

Informing The World's Illiterate Through a Mobile Device - Huffington Post (blog) | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Informing The World's Illiterate Through a Mobile Device
Huffington Post (blog)
Around the world, poverty and the burden of disease correlates directly with illiteracy and low literacy populations. ...
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Math drive among sweeping reforms - Jamaica Gleaner

Math drive among sweeping reforms - Jamaica Gleaner | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Math drive among sweeping reforms
Jamaica Gleaner
The education system officially opens its doors today to more than 600,000 students at all levels for the new school year, providing them with the opportunity to better themselves.
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Financial Literacy 101 - The Pineapple Newspaper

Financial Literacy 101 - The Pineapple Newspaper | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
The Pineapple Newspaper
Financial Literacy 101
The Pineapple Newspaper
In a world of complex financial markets and products, many people believe that financial literacy is for those working in finance and banking.
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Need Help Picking the Right Learning Game? Some Things to Consider

Need Help Picking the Right Learning Game? Some Things to Consider | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

What criteria matter when considering learning games? First, ask the broad questions: How and when a game can be used? Then, be more specific: What kind of game is best suited to particular learning objectives?


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, September 2, 2014 10:55 AM

Games are valuable teaching and learning tools.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, September 3, 2014 1:19 PM

Great article! 

Training in Business's curator insight, September 4, 2014 5:22 AM

Need Help Picking the Right Learning Game? Some Things to Consider 

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Strategies to control aflatoxin in groundnut value chains | IFPRI Publication


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IFPRIKM's curator insight, September 2, 2014 12:21 PM

Groundnuts, which are widely consumed in West Africa, are prone to contamination by aflatoxin during production and storage. Although aflatoxin plays a role in many of the important health risks in developing countries, individuals and governments ignore the risks because their health effects are not immediate. In the developed world strong regulations remove contaminated kernels and their products from the food systems. The objective of this paper is to examine production and marketing practices, particularly grading methods, in Ghana’s groundnut value chain to obtain a clear understanding of the sources and levels of aflatoxin contamination in the crop and how such contamination can be sharply reduced.