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9 Interesting Social Media Tools | Ian Cleary

9 Interesting Social Media Tools | Ian Cleary | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Are you looking for some new social media tools to add to your arsenal?


Every day, we come across new tools and, each quarter, we write a post where we share some really interesting tools that we have come across.  Some of these tools are new, some are in beta and some have been around for a while but we have only recently discovered them.


I’m sure you’ll find something in this list that will  help your business!...


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:22 PM

Ian Cleary offers nine very useful social media tools. Recommended reading 9/10.

Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 16, 2014 9:03 PM

Ian Clearly has list of new social media tools worth investigating.

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Best 200 Free White Papers for Digital Marketing – UpCity

As we’ve previously mentioned in our last list, we love research here at UpCity. It gives us not only the current trends and knowledge of the landscape, but it also allows us to come up with new ideas and test them out. We see a lot of companies spend all their time and energy crafting white papers, but many marketers don’t have the time to read them as they get published. For this reason, we’ve decided to compile a list of the best 200 free white papers on digital marketing.


With access to all of these resources in one spot, you’re free to favorite this link and check up on what you want to learn next. Everything from SEO to web design is right here for you to learn. We just encourage you to take your pick and start reading!...


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 11, 2014 9:01 PM

This is a big, bad, awesome content marketing and social marketing resource from UpCity. Highly recommended 9.5/10.

FRANK FEATHER ~ Business Futurist's curator insight, August 12, 2014 9:54 AM

Too many marketing white papers, not enough time. Maybe this list will help.

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The World of Social Media Monitoring and Analytics | Marketing Technology Blog

The World of Social Media Monitoring and Analytics | Marketing Technology Blog | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

The first bit of data on this infographic is pretty fascinating… the growth of the analytics tool market. In my opinion, it points to a couple issues. First is that we’re all still seeking better tools to report and monitor on our marketing strategies and second is that we’re willing to apply a larger percentage of our marketing budget to ensure our strategies are working.


As we use social media to connect with others, we create a digital data trail of human interaction. When analyzed properly, this valuable data can show public opinion and consumer trends, make predictions and provide insights. For companies properly collecting and analyzing this data, it can be key to success.


This infographic from Demand Metric was designed to provide organizations with information about the world of social media monitoring and analytics....


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 12, 2014 1:15 AM

All about social media monitoring and analytics best practices and trends.

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Embracing Messy Learning

Embracing Messy Learning | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

I am slowly learning to embrace the struggles that students experience as they engage with authentic work. If I don't allow learning to be messy, I eliminate authentic experiences for students as thinkers and creators. I find it important to regularly remind myself that frustration leads to insights and that learning is not necessarily the equivalent of mastery.


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 8, 2014 9:46 PM

Learning is messy. It is a recurring process which is always recommencing itself.

 

@ivon_ehd1

magnus sandberg's curator insight, August 9, 2014 4:24 AM

The article is good, but what I really love is the term "messy learning" itself. So much teaching in school has the ideal of creating clairity and being systematic in every part of the learning process. But that is simply not how learning happens. We need to embrace the messyness!

Josh Round's curator insight, August 10, 2014 12:08 PM

The messy learning described here mirrors the struggles and frustrations our Learners face in communicative classrooms - a inherent part of the process of learning a language.

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Morphing into a 21st Century Teacher (updated)

Morphing into a 21st Century Teacher (updated) | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 8, 2014 3:53 AM

Mia MacMeekin provides 27 ways to be a 21st century educator in this infographic. The image above is a small portion of what she provides in the complete infographic.

Click through to see all 27 elements and share your thoughts on this topic. Are there elements that you believe should be included? Do you think that you meet all the elements? Where are your strengths and which areas should you consider upgrading?

Kimberly House's curator insight, August 11, 2014 1:59 PM

I will definitely be using this in the weeks to come. It's a good reminder for teachers.

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Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"When it comes to brain development, time in the classroom may be less important than time on the playground.

'The experience of play changes the connections of the neurons at the front end of your brain,' says , a researcher at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada. 'And without play experience, those neurons aren't changed,' he says."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 9, 2014 8:01 PM

Allowing young students free play time is important since it helps set up the prefrontal cortex (where executive functioning is located) to set up neuron pathways that help students to solve problems, make plans and regulate emotions. However, more and more schools are taking time away from recess, to focus on Common Core subjects.

It is critical that this is free play. The post states "No coaches, no umpires, no rule books."

Does your school have a policy about recess? Are students allowed to choose what to do, or are they given choices? This post shares insights that you may want to share with your PTO as well as others whom work in your school.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, August 10, 2014 11:08 AM

Not just young kids, all kids! Studies indicate that the prefrontal cortex isn't fully developed until mid -20's for some. Really confirms the adage, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 30, 2014 9:53 PM

Unit 1 Nature and Perspectives of Geography

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, February 8, 3:41 AM

A great collection of maps - although because they are on a pop-culture website, it might be worth downloading and then referencing them in class. 

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, February 9, 9:26 AM

Seth Dixon - the teacher that sent this article at the first place - assess a very sound comment about the use of maps as tools of comprehenssion of the real world. I love maps, but can t avoid to be worried about what he is saying, so I recommend a thougthful reading of his statements.

(Seth Dixon - el profesor que envió este artículo en primer lugar - hace un profundo comentario acerca del empleo de mapas como herramietas de comprensión del mundo real. Yo amo los mapas, pero no puedo evitar preocuparme por lo que (Dixon) señala, así que recomiendo una reflexiva lectura de sus planteamientos.)  

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First taste of chocolate

"To be honest I do not know what they make of my beans," says farmer N'Da Alphonse. "I've heard they're used as flavoring in cooking, but I've never seen it. I do not even know if it's true." Watch how the Dutch respond to a cocoa bean in return or you can watch our entire episode on chocolate here.


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Keegan Johns's curator insight, August 27, 2014 10:01 AM

I think it is good for them to see and taste chocolate because they work very hard to grow and harvest the beans, but don't even know what they are used for. These people deserve to know what they are helping create because they work so hard and don't get paid that much for it.

 

-KJ

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, September 10, 2014 2:39 PM

Sad how the people who do the hard work so often enjoy the fruit of their labour.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:03 PM

It's interesting and fascinating to see how the workers that harvest the cocoa bean are so excited about the results of their hard work. Having grown up, our entire lives we have been exposed to chocolate and have taken it for granted, but seeing the men who gather the beans enjoy chocolate so much was cool because they did not know what the bean was being used for and seeing their hard work make something sweet is a nice surprise for them. Due to chocolate being expensive in Ivory Coast, the people can not enjoy the fruits of their labor as much as they would like, but shows how home grown products can't be enjoyed by those that make them.

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Woods Hole, MA: Exosuit aids WHOI scientists explore Greek shipwreck | CapeCodOnline.com

Woods Hole, MA: Exosuit aids WHOI scientists explore Greek shipwreck | CapeCodOnline.com | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Yes, the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is taking the first archaeological expedition in 40 years to explore an ancient Greek shipwreck. Yes, it promises to be the most exhaustive examination of the famous site ever done. And yes, the last person to officially visit the site was Jacques Cousteau. But all anyone wants to talk about is the exosuit.


The exosuit is a hard metal dive suit that allows divers to reach depths of 1,000 feet and see and manipulate objects under water, and eliminates the need for a lengthy decompression routine that is typically necessary after dives.


But most people see an underwater Iron Man suit making a guest appearance in an Indiana Jones movie. And in a place where scientists drop mentions of their trips to Antarctica the way other people talk about going to the mall, the exosuit has created quite a buzz around the Woods Hole dock, said marine archaeologist Brendan Foley, the expedition's director.


“We can get pretty jaded. There's always cool stuff around the dock,” Foley said. “But when we had the suit out and we were doing training, we had a crowd of these grizzled WHOI science veterans with their mouths agape. It's just cool.”


The exosuit wasn't created for science. It was designed by Nuytco Research, a Canadian undersea technology firm, and before being lent to WHOI it was being used by J.F. White Contracting Co., a civil engineering firm based in Framingham. This will be its first test, and a high-profile one, at that.


“The suit has never been deployed in combat, so to speak,” Foley said. “It's a brand-new system, brand spanking new. This will be one of its first operational deployments.”


OK, so back to the science. Foley has been invited by the Greek government to participate in a 30-day underwater expedition to what's known as the Antikythera shipwreck. Named for the Aegean Sea island off which the wreck was located, the Antikythera sank in about 60 B.C. It sat in nearly 400 feet of water for centuries until sponge divers happened upon the wreck in 1900. The following year, divers on an expedition found statues, glasswork and tools from the wreck.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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A strange definition of a ‘bad’ teacher | Answer Sheet | WashPost.com

A strange definition of a ‘bad’ teacher | Answer Sheet | WashPost.com | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Keoni Wright is the lead plaintiff  in a lawsuit organized by Campbell Brown’s education advocacy group that is seeking to overturn New York laws that provide tenure and other job  protections to K-12 teachers. Brown has appeared on a number of television shows explaining her new endeavor, which will involve filing lawsuits in other states, as well, in an attempt to have national impact on tenure laws.  (Here’s a write-up about her appearance on “The Colbert Report,” and here’s a fact-check of what she said on the show).


The Wright vs. New York lawsuit, which has seven parents as plaintiffs, was filed a month after a Los Angeles judge struck down teacher tenure and other related California laws that offer job security to educators (though the judge stayed the decision until an appeal can be heard). Brown has said repeatedly that she is leading this effort because she  believes it is too hard for school systems to get rid of “bad” teachers and that it is union-negotiated teacher job protections that lead to poor quality education for many underprivileged students.


Critics say this is nonsense and that giving teachers due process when they are accused of wrongdoing protects against patronage and other forms of administrative whim. They also note that many students get inadequate educations in non-union states where teachers have no job protections and that tenured teachers can be and are fired, despite conventional wisdom to the contrary.


Whatever you think of job protections for teachers, Wright inadvertently raised a separate issue during an interview he did with Campbell on NY1′s “Inside City Hall with Errol Louis”: What exactly is a “bad” teacher? Some answers are obvious, others less so.


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STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) program at BAA | Boston Arts Academy

STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) program at BAA | Boston Arts Academy | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
August, 2014
Dear Friends of Boston Arts Academy,

 

I hope you are all having a restful summer. I am delighted to share some exciting news about our STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) program at BAA.

 

We are thrilled to announce that this fall we will open a new STEAM Laboratory at BAA. We are proud to say that BAA's STEAM Lab will be the first of its kind in an urban public arts high school! By infusing the "Arts" into STEM, our students discover a passion for their academics and recognize how arts and academics are both intertwined and essential to their success. We are excited to reach new heights with our cutting-edge STEAM curriculum. Experts estimate that as many as 65% of today's grade school students will end up working in jobs that have not been invented yet. Boston Arts Academy's STEAM Lab will help prepare our students for this reality.  

 

We have hired Nettrice Gaskins, ABD in the Digital Media Program at Georgia Institute of Technology, to serve as our STEAM Lab Director.  Before her graduate work at Georgia Institute of Technology, Nettrice was at the Massachusetts College of Art and Design where she taught visual language to first-year college students and computer animation as part of MassArt's K-12 program.

 

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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."


Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 


Tags: mapping, perspective.


Via Seth Dixon
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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:28 AM

Would you perception of the world change if you saw it upside down?

Mrs. B's curator insight, September 22, 2014 7:02 AM

Unit 1 !!!!

 

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

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Motivation: The Overlooked Sixth Component of Reading

Motivation: The Overlooked Sixth Component of Reading | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Learners are motivated by three factors: desire to learn, incentives, or fear of failure. As we grow, most of the early curiosity is tested away, and school becomes work. Obstacles increase, desire to learn decreases, and incentives and/or fear of failure move to the forefront. Jack Canfield, self-esteem expert, reports that 80 percent of first graders posses high self-esteem, but by high school graduation, this drops to a staggering five percent.


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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 12, 2014 4:51 AM

A pretty sad statistic, but some good suggestions.


Saran Ahluwalia's curator insight, August 12, 2014 10:37 AM

How can we rethink learning spaces that can serve children differently?

Linda Denty's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:33 PM

Quite a sad statistic!