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Tools for Achieving Oral Fluency - Language Magazine

Tools for Achieving Oral Fluency - Language Magazine | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Language Magazine
Tools for Achieving Oral Fluency
Language Magazine
PechaKucha is a method of presenting information using pictures only. A traditional PechaKucha is done in a 20 by 20 format — that's twenty images by twenty seconds.
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(EN) - Intellectual Capital Glossary | Michael I. Shamos

(EN) - Intellectual Capital Glossary | Michael I. Shamos | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

"This hypertext glossary is a supplement to the author's course 45-886, Intellectual Capital and its Protection, at the Graduate School of Industrial Administration at Carnegie Mellon University. For explanations of abbreviations used in the glossary, see abbreviations. Please note: THIS GLOSSARY IS NOT, AND IS NOT INTENDED TO BE, A COMPLETE INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY REFERENCE. Only those terms are included that relate to the subject course. For information about proper legal use of this glossary, see the legal notice below."


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Trend Media City Partners with Intelligent Community Forum to Co-Host Summit 13 | Intelligent Community Forum (ICF)

The ICF Summit is this week, with events running from tomorrow through Friday with the culmination being the Awards Luncheon at Steiner Studios Stage Six in Brooklyn.

 

Co-hosting this year’s Summit is Trend Media City, the project developer branch of the Udemba Group. Trend Media City seeks to build capacity and develop creative hubs in Africa with the development of intelligent smart communities that promote broadband economy and offer state-of-the-art infrastructures setting new global standards in design, construction, energy efficiency and eco-friendliness, in order to lure and retain the intellectual capital that builds successful businesses in the arts, literature, culture, media, entertainment, science, technology, tourism and lifestyle sectors.

 

“Trend Media City's key mission to develop creative hubs and centers of innovation and learning in African cities is clearly in tandem with the stated aims and objectives of ICF. Therefore we find a meeting of minds between ICF and TMC for our project in Africa.  We are very excited to become involved as an international Patron of the Forum and look forward to playing an active role in promoting the Forum and its activities," noted Mr. Uzo Udemba, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Udemba Group, the parent company of TMCL.  "Supporting the Forum is only a starting point for us.  We will continue to explore ways to extend and deepen our support for the Forum activities especially in Africa and make its impact felt on the largest possible number of communities across the continent.  We seek to lead the African renaissance.”

 

Mr. Udemba will be at the Summit, participating in a discussion with ICF Co-Founder Lou Zacharilla at the Intelligent Communities Alumni Dinner, tomorrow evening at the Harmonie Club in New York City. 

 

In a blog post titled The Call Back Home, ICF co-founder Louis Zacharilla discussed Udemba’s mission:

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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15 years of the Journal of Intellectual Capital and counting: a manifesto for transformational IC research

15 years of the Journal of Intellectual Capital and counting: a manifesto for transformational IC research | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Abstract Purpose – To review and critique the current status of intellectual capital (IC) research as published in the Journal of Intellectual Capital (JIC) as it heads into its 15th year with a view to understanding the past and possible direction...

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Modern art was CIA 'weapon' | The Independent.co.uk

Modern art was CIA 'weapon' | The Independent.co.uk | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

For decades in art circles it was either a rumour or a joke, but now it is confirmed as a fact. The Central Intelligence Agency used American modern art - including the works of such artists as Jackson Pollock, Robert Motherwell, Willem de Kooning and Mark Rothko - as a weapon in the Cold War. In the manner of a Renaissance prince - except that it acted secretly - the CIA fostered and promoted American Abstract Expressionist painting around the world for more than 20 years.


The connection is improbable. This was a period, in the 1950s and 1960s, when the great majority of Americans disliked or even despised modern art - President Truman summed up the popular view when he said: "If that's art, then I'm a Hottentot." As for the artists themselves, many were ex- communists barely acceptable in the America of the McCarthyite era, and certainly not the sort of people normally likely to receive US government backing.


Why did the CIA support them? Because in the propaganda war with the Soviet Union, this new artistic movement could be held up as proof of the creativity, the intellectual freedom, and the cultural power of the US. Russian art, strapped into the communist ideological straitjacket, could not compete.


The existence of this policy, rumoured and disputed for many years, has now been confirmed for the first time by former CIA officials. Unknown to the artists, the new American art was secretly promoted under a policy known as the "long leash" - arrangements similar in some ways to the indirect CIA backing of the journal Encounter, edited by Stephen Spender.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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How Creationism Imprisons the Mind

How Creationism Imprisons the Mind | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Intellectual freedom is one of humanity’s greatest gifts—and biggest burdens. Our ability to ask questions, to test ideas, to doubt is what separates us from our fellow animals. But doubt can be as terrifying as it is liberating. And it’s the terror of doubt that fosters the toxic, life-negating cult...

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10 Conditions For Self-Sustaining Learning In The Classroom | TeachThought

10 Conditions For Self-Sustaining Learning In The Classroom | TeachThought | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

by Grant Wiggins

 

"In all the hullabaloo about standards* and tests, a more basic aim has long been sacrificed in K-12 education: ensuring that students graduate able to handle the freedoms of college and the pro-active obligations of the workplace. As many have long heard me say, my children had more intellectual and executive freedom in Montessori School as 4 year olds than they did as high school students....

 

"What is wanted in education is a curriculum and assessment system that builds in, by design, a gradual release of teacher responsibility across the long-term scope and sequence. Traditional curriculum design runs completely counter to this idea, of course: the work gets harder and harder but the student has practically no executive control over the intellectual agenda up until graduation."


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After Human Rights Watch Report, Egypt Says Group Broke Law - New York Times

After Human Rights Watch Report, Egypt Says Group Broke Law - New York Times | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
After Human Rights Watch Report, Egypt Says Group Broke Law New York Times The Egyptian authorities lodged similar accusations of unauthorized operations and espionage in late 2011 against dozens of employees of nonprofit groups, including the...
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Intellectual Freedom and Learning versus Patent and Copyright (by Stephan Kinsella)

More videos on intellectual property at: http://vforvoluntary.com/intellectual-property 6 November 2010 Students For Liberty Texas Regional Conference Univer...
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Decentralised internet governance: the case of a ‘peer-to-peer cloud’ | Internet Policy Review

The architecture of a networked system is its underlying technical structure - its logical and structural layout. In my last article for theInternet Policy Review (Musiani, 2013a), I have built upon the work of several authors in science and technology studies, economics, law and computer science (e.g. Star, 1999; van Schewick, 2010; Elkin-Koren, 2006; Agre, 2003) to discuss the idea of network architecture as internet governance. I have suggested that, by changing the design of the networks subtending internet-based services and the global internet itself, the politics of the network of networks are affected – the balance of rights between users and providers, the capacity of online communities to engage in open and direct interaction, the fair competition between actors of the internet market.


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Okay, We've Done all the Homework: 34 Sourced, Peer-Reviewed Medical Studies Proving Marijuana Cures Cancer

Okay, We've Done all the Homework: 34 Sourced, Peer-Reviewed Medical Studies Proving Marijuana Cures Cancer | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
It's not just that Nurse Mary Jane 'fixes all ills' and really can cure over 34 different types of cancer, she's also God's Gift to Mankind in that over 50 000 every day products can be made from hemp including all the...

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Research and Markets: Global Personalized Medicine Report 2014 - Scientific ... - Business Wire (press release)

Research and Markets: Global Personalized Medicine Report 2014 - Scientific ... - Business Wire (press release) | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Research and Markets: Global Personalized Medicine Report 2014 - Scientific ...
Business Wire (press release)
Various technologies are integrated to develop personalized therapies for specific therapeutic areas described in the report.

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RI libraries to benefit from federal grants | The Brown Daily Herald

RI libraries to benefit from federal grants | The Brown Daily Herald | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Three Rhode Island libraries will receive $800,000 from the Institute of Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grants program, with the grants going to  Providence Community Library, Providence Public Library and University of Rhode Island Library System.


The initiatives funded by the grant — made possible by Sen. Jack Reed’s, D-R.I., Museum and Library Services Act of 2010 —  share a mission of fostering community collaboration to enhance literacy and learning.


Providence Community Library will partner with Ready to Learn Providence to head a two-year early learning literacy project called “Ready for K!” Providence Public Library will partner with statewide organizations to address digital literacy, adult education, learning resources and workforce services. URI will use the funds to integrate digital media with children’s libraries, according to a press release from Reed’s office.


School readiness is an issue important in Providence, where 46 percent of public school students do not read at grade level, said Michelle Novello, Providence Community Library program director. Kids “spend first through third grade learning to read, and then in fourth, they read to learn,” she said, adding that children who cannot read by the fourth grade fall behind.


Early learning literacy is largely affected by income level, Novello said, addingthat low-income children fall further behind over the summer when access to resources that would help them sustain their reading level is often limited. The IMLS grant will fund initiatives to ameliorate this backslide by attracting children to the city’s libraries during the summer and after school, she added.


Part of the initiative is “teaching parents and caregivers that the library has resources that would benefit and support them,” Novello said. Libraries should not assume families know what resources are available, accessible and free, she added. Providence Community Library will use the funds for community outreach to better inform residents about programs and help assess public school students entering kindergarten for literacy and preparedness problems.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Does It Make A Difference? Experts Weigh In On Added Hour Of Reading ... - WJCT NEWS

Does It Make A Difference? Experts Weigh In On Added Hour Of Reading ... - WJCT NEWS | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Does It Make A Difference? Experts Weigh In On Added Hour Of Reading ...
WJCT NEWS
However, in an effort to improve literacy scores across the county, the district added 11 more schools to the list.
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After Muzzling Scientists, Canadian Government Now Moves On To Book Burnings | Techdirt.com

After Muzzling Scientists, Canadian Government Now Moves On To Book Burnings | Techdirt.com | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Techdirt has been tracking the sorry saga of Canada's assault on free speech for a while, as it first muzzled scientists and librarians, and then clamped down on the public expressing its views. Now, it seems, the Canadian government of Stephen Harper is attacking knowledge by dismantling key scientific collections, as this post on The Tyee reports:


Scientists say the closure of some of the world's finest fishery, ocean and environmental libraries by the Harper government has been so chaotic that irreplaceable collections of intellectual capital built by Canadian taxpayers for future generations has been lost forever.


There seems to have been no attempt to find other homes for books, maps and unique collections of historical data, or even to offer them for free to the Canadian public that paid for them. Instead, they are simply being destroyed, some in literal book burnings:


"Many collections such as the Maurice Lamontagne Institute Library in Mont-Joli, Quebec ended up in dumpsters while others such as Winnipeg's historic Freshwater Institute library were scavenged by citizens, scientists and local environmental consultants. Others were burned or went to landfills, say scientists."


What's strange is that even though the rationale for this mass destruction is apparently in order to reduce costs, opportunities to sell off more valuable items have been ignored. A scientist is quoted as follows:


Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Berg: From big data to healthcare solutions

Berg: From big data to healthcare solutions | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Berg focuses research on understanding how alterations in metabolism relate to disease onset. The company has a deep pipeline of early-stage technologies in CNS diseases and metabolic diseases that complement its late-stage clinical trial activity in cancer and prevention of chemotoxicity. Armed with use of the Berg Interrogative Biology™ discovery platform that translates biological output into therapeutic candidates, Berg is well positioned for rapid commercialization of its intellectual capital.


CANCER

A hallmark feature of cancer is the Warburg effect characterized by a preferential utilization of glucose for molecular sustainability of the oncogenic phenotype. Utility of the Berg Interrogative Biology™ technology platform has enabled unraveling of key factors in the control of metabolic network differential between a healthy cell and a cancer cell microenvironment. The company has successfully harnessed the ability of BPM 31510 to recapitulate mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and normalize metabolic networks to create an anti-cancer effect. A topical formulation of BPM 31510 for the treatment of skin cancers has demonstrated safety and efficacy in Phase I/II trials. The endogenous nature of the BPM 31510 technology is key to the molecule's safety profile and absence of adverse effects in clinical trials thus far. This phenomenon has recapitulated an ongoing Phase I dose escalation clinical trial using an intravenous formulation of 31510 in the treatment of solid tumors.

Moreover, Berg has successfully leveraged the ability of the Berg M3™ Technology in leveraging the BPM 31510 advantage in modulating mitochondrial metabolic networks to augment chemotherapeutic efficacy of standard of care in cancer management. Interestingly, priming of mitochondria from BPM 31510 in In vitro and preclinical animal studies provide support for the unparalleled advantage of the BPM 31510 combination in mitigating chemotherapy induced toxicity routinely reported in treatment protocols in advanced solid tumor cases.

Berg technology was also utilized to identify other lead molecule BPM 31543 that contains a calcitriol based technology to prevent chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) currently in Phase I clinical trials at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. In addition, preclinical models demonstrate the utility of BPM 31543 in the potential treatment of chemotherapy induced myelosuppression (CIMS). In both clinical indications the endogenous nature of the active molecule in the formulation has led to absence of adverse effects in preclinical models.



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Krishan Maggon 's curator insight, August 6, 3:24 AM

Berg has ongoing R&D projects in cancer, CNS, Metabolic and inflammatory diseases.

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Scientists Say “Yes” to Investment in Sustainable Agriculture - The Equation

Scientists Say “Yes” to Investment in Sustainable Agriculture - The Equation | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
RT @marciadabliu: Scientists Say “Yes” to Investment in Sustainable Agriculture http://t.co/iw3zdxrlA5 via @feedly
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Libraries and the Internet Toolkit | Intellectual Freedom Manual 8

Libraries and the Internet Toolkit | Intellectual Freedom Manual 8 | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

At the 2012 ALA Midwinter Meeting in Dallas, TX, the Intellectual Freedom Committee approved the final draft of the revised and updated “Libraries and Internet Toolkit: Tips and Guidance for Managing and Communicating about the Internet.” The toolkit is now available as a downloadable PDF.

 

The new toolkit is intended to be a practical guide to managing Internet services in libraries of all types. It includes up-to-date information on filtering, the requirements of the Children’s Internet Protection Act, the use of, and access to, social media in libraries, guidelines on developing Internet policies, and practical advice on handling messaging and communications concerning library Internet services.

 

Download the toolkit here: 

http://www.ifmanual.org/sites/default/files/Libraries%20and%20the%20Internet%20Toolkit.pdf


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Japan's Master Cartographer: The Inoh Tadataka Museum

Japan's Master Cartographer: The Inoh Tadataka Museum | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
If you're a map freak, as I am, and you are in the Tokyo area, then a trip out to Sawara is mandatory. It's especially convenient for travelers with a few hours to kill between flights at Narita International Airport, because Sawara is just a half hour by local train from Narita station.

Sawara is famous for its old quarter of lovingly preserved Edo-era townhouses along the banks of the willow-lined Ono River, which earns the town its nickname "Little Edo." Due to its strategic location where the Ono meets the mighty Tone, Japan's greatest waterway, Sawara was a thriving merchant town that benefited by being a bit of a remove from the political center of Edo. Sawara's citizens enjoyed more intellectual freedom than their big-city counterparts, it seems, and felt free to indulge, for example, an interest in Western science.

Inoh Tadataka (1745-1818), a wealthy Sawara rice and sake merchant, had ancestors with a penchant for surveying and mapmaking, and perhaps thus influenced he developed a fascination with astronomy in middle age. Retiring from his business at 49, he moved to Edo, where he studied for five years with the Shogunate's official astronomer, then set out on the first of ten surveying expeditions the length and breadth of Japan. That initial effort, to make the first accurate map of the northern island of Ezo (now Hokkaido), so impressed the Shogunate that it commissioned him for several more expeditions. Inoh traveled and surveyed almost incessantly for 17 years until shortly before his death; his masterwork, a detailed map of the entire Japanese archipelago, was published posthumously in 1821. The soon-to-be legendary....
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MA: The Case for Municipal Broadband in Cambridge | Cambridge Community Television

MA: The Case for Municipal Broadband in Cambridge | Cambridge Community Television | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

In Cambridge, as in most of the United States, the free market has failed to provide broadband service that meets the needs of a thriving, innovative city. It has, as well, failed to provide service to the economically less fortunate, adding yet another barrier to the climb up the economic ladder. When the market failed to provide ubiquitous electrical and phone service, the government stepped in to address those market failures. It's time for Cambridge to step in and provide municipal broadband, building a state-of-the-art network and using Cambridge's vast wealth to subsidize service for those who can't afford to pay.


Broadband in Cambridge is offered by a single monopoly provider, Comcast. While the City has tried to solicit other broadband providers, none are interested. As Susan Crawford, currently a Visiting Professor in Intellectual Property at the Harvard Law School, documents in her book "Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry & Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age" large telecommunications companies have effectively divided markets in ways that avoid competition. Verizon, which has halted all new investment in its FIOS fiber optic network, and AT&T control the wireless market. In the wired broadband market,


Comcast has announced that it is buying its largest rival, Time-Warner Communications, asserting that this won't harm competition because they serve none of the same customers. Analysts are unanimous in concluding that this merger is about broadband, not cable television. With even less competition, Comcast will have no incentive to upgrade its broadband systems from coaxial cable installed a decade ago to modern, faster fiber optic systems, nor is there any pressure for Comcast to compete on price.


Lost in the image of Cambridge and its vital innovation economy is its economic underclass. While average per capita income in Cambridge grows, its poverty rate remains unchanged. According to the City Council's Neighborhood and Long Term Planning Committee, 30% of Cambridge Housing Authority residents don't have home internet access.


The Cambridge school system, which has limited information on this topic, reports somewhat lower numbers. But it's not hard find examples, such as the Cambridge Rindge and Latin student who is a member of the high school robotics team but who has trouble doing homework because of lack of internet access at home.


Maps of poverty in Cambridge show the tragic irony that Cambridge's poorest areas are adjacent to Kendall Square, an area that is creating vast, internet-fueled wealth. But the opportunities that are presented by Cambridge's thriving innovation economy are largely closed to those who don't have internet access.


In 2005, the Cambridge City Council unanimously adopted an order requesting the City to "devise a plan to close the digital divide by making wireless internet access (wi fi) available throughout the city" calling the internet almost as essential as the telephone. In 2006, the Cable TV, Telecommunications and Public Utilities Committee of the Council was told by City Chief Information Officer Mary Hart of an "exciting" plan to use MIT-developed "mesh" technology in the Newtowne Court Housing Project and that the City had established a "Digital Divide" committee.


That equipment has since been installed, abandoned, replaced, and abandoned again. However bad that sounds, it was even worse. Network routers were placed in peoples' apartments without any explanation of what they were for or why they were placed there. Thus, people returning home found unexplained devices with blinking lights, installations they viewed with suspicion.


Remarkably, despite the lack of attention by the City, the Digital Divide committee has continued to meet and some of its members have been active in Newtowne Court this winter, working to revive, once again, this network installation.


Click headline to read more--



Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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RUSA Releases Draft of Library-based Financial Literacy Education ...

RUSA Releases Draft of Library-based Financial Literacy Education ... | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
From the RUSA News Blog: The Reference & User Services Association (RUSA), with the support of the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), presents the following draft guidelines and best practices for feedback.
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How social media facilitates peer review

How social media facilitates peer review | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Much has been written about how Web 2.0 tools can change the healthcare landscape.  It would appear a recent set of circumstances has upped the ante.

This story begins with a recent study that attempted to tackle the problem of ICU infections. ICU infections are a challenging problem, patients who are admitted to the ICU are at risk of worsening illness and death from infections such as MRSA which can be acquired while in the ICU setting. To counteract this risk, current practice is the performance of surveillance cultures on people who are admitted to intensive care. If the person tests positive for certain infections they are placed in isolation (and health care providers are asked to wear silly gowns and share a useless stethoscope).

The success of this strategy is dubious, ranging from successful in some studies to nearly useless in others. Based upon my personal observations of my own hospital’s isolation practices, my only conclusion has been that yellow is not a good look for me.

But I digress. In this study, patients underwent “universal decontamination” with chlorhexidine, a commonly used antiseptic. The study found a dramatic drop in the numbers of MRSA infections and bloodstream infections. The study was peer reviewed and published in the flagship of medical publishing, the New England Journal of Medicine.

The results were so impressive in fact, that the accompanying editorial in the same issue was titled “Screening Inpatients for MRSA — Case Closed.”  The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality even advised on its website that hospitals begin implementing universal decontamination.

And why wouldn’t they? The 44% drop in ICU bloodstream infections resulted in a number needed to treat of 54, didn’t it?

Um, well, about those numbers …

An online journal club discussion found that the numbers didn’t quite add up.  The discussion was taken over to the Intensive Care Network, a relatively small blog in the outer rings of the healthcare galaxy, light years from the central galactic location of the mighty Journal. Their online community was called to look at the studies calculations and issued the following challenge:

PLEASE have a go and see if you can match their NNT’s.

IF you can’t there is a serious problem, with practice changing implications.

When none of them could get the numbers to add up, they contacted the study’s lead author.

Dr. Huang responded, and found the same problem as the rest of the community: There was an error in the calculations. As a result, the NNT increased from 54 patients to prevent one bloodstream infection to 99. Still encouraging, to be sure. But not nearly as impactful as the original results would suggest.

This story makes me excited about the power of Web 2.0 tools, in particular social media sites that allow for rapid interactions between researchers and clinical providers so that they can exchange information in real time. In this case, the combination of the traditional journal club combined with Web 2.0 tools effectively lead to the crowdsourcing of the usual peer review process. By turning the usual peer review process on its head, trusted information that was potentially practice changing but factually erroneous was corrected so that practicing clinicians could make decisions based on good data.

I don’t foresee that social media tools tools like blogs and crowdsourcing will ever replace the current process of academic peer review. But perhaps by replacing the one way exchange of information between researchers and clinicians with a two-way exchange of information between them, we can make the process better.

And if that results in me no longer  having to wear those ridiculous looking gowns, well so much the better.



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CERN’s Higgs boson discovery passes peer review, becomes actual science | ExtremeTech

CERN’s Higgs boson discovery passes peer review, becomes actual science | ExtremeTech | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
CERN’s announcement on July 4 — that experiments performed by the Large Hadron Collider had discovered a particle that was consistent with the Higgs boson — has passed a key step towards becoming ratified science: Its findings have been published in the peer-reviewed journal Physics Letters B.

 

Back in July, both the CMS and ATLAS teams — teams of scientists tasked with analyzing the data produced by the CMS and ATLAS detectors — announced that they’d discovered a new elementary particle. CERN did not say that this was the Higgs boson, the so-called God particle, but as the Standard Model of particle physics only has one undiscovered particle remaining, it probably is the Higgs boson. Following CERN’s announcement, both the CMS and ATLAS teams submitted their findings to Physics Letters B — and today, both of their research papers have passed peer review by the scientific community, effectively becoming… science.


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Fed "peer-review process could have disastrous consequences"

Fed "peer-review process could have disastrous consequences" | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) recently issued a set of principles for the new Common Core–aligned tests.


The Department (of Education) plans to use a peer-review process to ensure that the tests are high quality and aligned to tough standards.


"Done poorly, this peer-review process could have disastrous consequences, namely giving lots of state leaders reason to ask, “The feds have to approve our tests? Tell me again how this isn’t nationalization of K–12 schooling at work?”"


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Top 10 Libraries for Children | Livability

Top 10 Libraries for Children | Livability | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
We looked at 500 libraries to find the best libraries for kids. The children's libraries we selected not only look amazing, they offer great programs and activities to get kids excited about reading, learning and exploring.

Via Ana Margarida Ramos
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