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ECIL 2015 | European Conference on Information ...

ECIL 2015 | European Conference on Information ... | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
ECIL 2015 | European Conference on Information Literacy http://t.co/YpI7KPwLzC
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The “Wild West” of Academic Publishing - Harvard Magazine

The “Wild West” of Academic Publishing - Harvard Magazine | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
The troubled present and promising future of scholarly communication
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Allow pupils to use Google in GCSE exams, says academic

Allow pupils to use Google in GCSE exams, says academic | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
A Harvard physics professor says schoolchildren must be allowed to access the internet and talk to friends in the exams hall to reflect the conditions seen in the workplace

Via Nik Peachey
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, December 8, 2014 7:42 AM

El profesor Eric Mazur, Decano de Física Aplicada en la Universidad de Harvard, muy conocido por su metodología de enseñanza "Peer Instruction" afirma que los adolescentes deberían tener acceso a internet y discutir preguntas con sus compañeros de clase durante los exámenes para que de esta manera realmente puedan estar preparados para el mundo real.

 

Estoy completamente de acuerdo y yo agregaría que las actuales formas de evaluación a través de exámenes y prácticas en aula deberían ser completamente reemplazadas por evaluaciones permanentes durante el desarrollo de las actividades lectivas, que deberían estar menos centradas en las tradicionales y aburridas (con honrosas excepciones por supuesto) clases magistrales y más en discusiones, desarrollo de proyectos, trabajos colaborativos y con enfoque interdisciplinar. Todo ello por supuesto conlleva a una mayor dedicación del profesor, a que él mismo desarrolle habilidades de trabajo en equipo, sea más creativo, se interese por la tecnología más allá del Word, el Powerpoint y el correo electrónico. En consecuencia.. un enorme reto por delante.

Betty Skeet's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:12 AM

Changes recommended by professor in how young people do GCSC exams to reflect the workplace conditions...using Google and conferring?

ғelιх c ѕeyғarтн's curator insight, December 20, 2014 5:03 AM

What fun.

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The surprising math of cities and corporations

"Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities — that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 4, 2014 2:44 PM

While corporations rise and fall, it is quite rare for a city to entirely fail as an economic system.  Huge cities have some negative consequences, but the networks that operate in the city function more efficiently on economies of scale in a way that offsets the negatives.  Increasing a city's population will continue to improve the economies of scale (larger cities have higher wages per capita, more creative employment per capita, etc.).  However, this growth requires major technological innovations to sustain long-term growth.  

 

Tagsurban, planningmegacities, industry, economic, scaleTED, video.

Built 4 Betterness Ed van den Berg's curator insight, December 14, 2014 3:17 PM

Not surprisingly the DNA of cities is a follow-up of human DNA and understanding this will explain and predict how the body of a city will develop!

SRA's curator insight, April 16, 2:10 AM

The idea that cities are just organisms that are satisfying the laws of biology is interesting. Especially because Physicist Geoffrey West brings the idea of Scalability which by definition is, the ability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work in a capable manner or its ability to be enlarged to accommodate that growth. What’s mind blowing to me is that the system that is referred to here is human interaction.  We create these cities through our interaction and experience. With a growth rate of 1,000,000 people every year the math adds up to an agreeable 15% rise in income levels, patents, and super creative people every year which is undoubted a win for civilization and society. But with that we must keep in mind also this means a 15% increase in things like deadly disease, crime, poverty, and ecological issues leading to further degradation of our planet. This unbounded growth means the system is destined to collapse. The math behind cities doesn't lie if we don’t prepare cities have a fate to die like every other organism in Biology. So it is up to us to create and innovate to sustain this growth and avoid the collapse. But we must do so at a forever increasing pace. Which subsequently is also part of another system predetermined to collapse. What I mean is what happens when we cannot innovate fast enough to sustain this growth?


- Caleb Beckett

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Product of Mexico - Harsh Harvest

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."


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Todd Scalia's curator insight, December 14, 2014 1:12 AM

we work the fields for our families. 

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, December 17, 2014 11:36 AM

It’s crazy to see how desperate some of these people are to get working and how much they do for such a little reward. These people are working longer and harder than probably all Americans and they are barely surviving. They work for survival. It’s hard for some of these people to stay healthy, especially in the harsh conditions and tight living spaces that these people have to deal with on an everyday basis. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2:10 PM

Corporations are always looking for the cheapest base product to import. Unfortunately for the laborers of Mexico, their country does not enforce globally accepted standards of labor. The US cannot police other countries' policies and procedures, but we can educate our own consumers about the working conditions behind the product they buy. The consumers then have a choice; do they want to pay 49 cents a pound for bananas or 99 cents. What is more important, the health and welfare of the employee who picked the produce or the financial well-being of the consumer who purchases it?

This obviously is big business for Mexico and the US should apply some pressure to motivate our friends south of the border to foster better working conditions for their employees. It would seem to me that Mexico could afford to pay their workers a little more and still be competitive given their proximity to the US. I think I will start buying my bananas from Ecuador....

 

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Struggle for top research grades fuels bullying among university staff

Struggle for top research grades fuels bullying among university staff | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
More than half of university staff say recent policy changes have caused an increase in bullying – and that institutions aren’t doing enough to tackle the issue
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Struggle for top research grades fuels bullying among university staff

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Are African farmers in danger of becoming slaves to patented seeds? - Genetic Literacy Project

Are African farmers in danger of becoming slaves to patented seeds? - Genetic Literacy Project | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
GMO debate is sometimes a proxy for questions about corporate control of agriculture, particularly in Africa. As in most cases, the real story is more nuanced.
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Are African farmers in danger of becoming slaves to patented seeds? - Genetic Literacy Project

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Farmers demand KAU research centre

Farmers demand KAU research centre | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
: The lack of a research centre under the Kerala Agricultural University (KAU) in Kozhikode is proving to be a “serious handicap” at a time when there is increasing demand for quality planting materials, including...
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whitepaper_datastorytelling.pdf

"Storytelling is a cornerstone of the human experience. Throughout human history, we have developed new mediums for telling stories—from oral histories to printed books to movies and even comic books. But can stories be told with data, as well as with images and words?


"This whitepaper explores the evolution of storytelling throughout human history, focusing on how modern data visualization tools can be used to tell especially powerful stories with numbers.


"Learn about the impact of stories on human cognition, how data stories can be used to communicate with decision makers, and how your data stories can be used to impact lasting change in the world."


Jim Lerman's insight: Free registration required on the site to download whitepaper.


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The Digital Learning Wheel

The Digital Learning Wheel | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Ring of Technologies is a beautiful visual wheel that displays a host of learning goals together with some examples of web tools to achieve them. To me this work (created and shared by UAF eLearning Faculty Resources) represents the core of digitally-based learning. It also chimes in with what we have said about purposeful use of technology in instruction. Having clear goals about what you want to target in your teaching using technology will definitely help your learners make the best of that technology.

Via Miloš Bajčetić, Jim Lerman
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