Research Capacity-Building in Africa
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Does ethical content curation exist? A data-driven answer from Scoop.it

Does ethical content curation exist? A data-driven answer from Scoop.it | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
We’ve been asked "how ethical is content curation?" so many times we decided to dig deep to give you a data answer: ethical content curation exists.

Via Dennis T OConnor
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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 1, 2015 4:19 PM

This is just the article I've been looking for. It reasurring to see that Scoop.it was built on a technical foundation that promotes ethical use of digital information.


I've used Scoop.it from the beginning with the understanding that curation can be "...a win-win-win deal for readers, curators and – perhaps more importantly – publishers."


The ability to filter and select information and then share it efficiently with Scoop.it technology is truly, "...a beautiful symbiosis between curators, readers and publishers."

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 13, 2015 9:23 PM
Dennis T OConnor's insight:

This is just the article I've been looking for. It reasurring to see that Scoop.it was built on a technical foundation that promotes ethical use of digital information.


I've used Scoop.it from the beginning with the understanding that curation can be "...a win-win-win deal for readers, curators and – perhaps more importantly – publishers."


The ability to filter and select information and then share it efficiently with Scoop.it technology is truly, "...a beautiful symbiosis between curators, readers and publishers."

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The Keyword Blog: Information Fluency Interactive Infographic

The Keyword Blog: Information Fluency Interactive Infographic | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

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midmarketplace's curator insight, August 9, 2015 5:20 PM

This is an interactive infographic. Click on a topic and you're taken to resources on the 21st Century Information Fluency website.  

 

Check it out?

Steve Whitmore's curator insight, August 14, 2015 8:05 AM

This is a great infographic for showing the thought process of finding information.

Terry Yelmene's curator insight, August 16, 2015 11:50 AM

A pretty well-reasoned, fundamental thought process for most knowledge work research.  This serves as an even better backward (there-to-here) model to guide the core research workflow process automation  a knowledge worker may want to devise, install.  Think work product-informed -> DevonThink structures -> DevonAgent w/'Active Filtered' automated searches.  The most important drivers here are - 'ethical' - (more than just multiple sources, a stage needs to be added at the work product stage to provide authenticity) and - 'bias' -  (a post automated search,  subsequent manual search for corroborating items selection to provide authority).

corroborating

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Performance funding for colleges: Research roundup - Journalist's Resource

Performance funding for colleges: Research roundup - Journalist's Resource | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
2015 selection of research on performance-based funding for higher education, including unintended impacts, an international comparison and a case study involving one historically black university.
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Invaluable Online Collection of Startup and Entrepreneur Resources

Invaluable Online Collection of Startup and Entrepreneur Resources | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Curated Startup and Entrepreneur Resources to inspire, cultivate and grow your business!

Via Daniel Watson
Nevermore Sithole's insight:


This collection of fantastic resources is so good I have pinned it to my browser bar so that it is always instantly accessible. Everything here is good quality and every business owner would derive benefit from diving into the site and exploring the vast array of resources available for FREE.

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Pannirselvam's curator insight, July 18, 2015 5:38 AM

small business  resource 

Marc Wachtfogel, PhD's curator insight, August 7, 2015 8:31 AM


This collection of fantastic resources is so good I have pinned it to my browser bar so that it is always instantly accessible. Everything here is good quality and every business owner would derive benefit from diving into the site and exploring the vast array of resources available for FREE.

Daniel Tremblay's curator insight, August 10, 2015 1:21 PM

En effet, de bonnes sources d'information sur de multiples sujets ...

 

Indeed, a good collection of resources ...

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10 Great Twitter Marketing Article Links

10 Great Twitter Marketing Article Links | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Twitter Marketing can be tough. But with these 10 Resources, you'll grow your Followers, drive more Traffic to your site, and revolutionize your Tweets.

Via Daniel Watson
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Business owners who have recognised the growing effectiveness of marketing their businesses via Twitter, need significant guidance, to be effective in this endeavour. Rather than re-inventing the wheel or proceeding haphazardly by trial and error, learning from those who have the knowledge is a recommended course of action. The information contained in the 10 links in this article, should prove invaluable, for any business owner seeking to effectively use Twitter to promote their business.

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Marc Wachtfogel, PhD's curator insight, August 7, 2015 8:23 AM


Business owners who have recognised the growing effectiveness of marketing their businesses via Twitter, need significant guidance, to be effective in this endeavour. Rather than re-inventing the wheel or proceeding haphazardly by trial and error, learning from those who have the knowledge is a recommended course of action. The information contained in the 10 links in this article, should prove invaluable, for any business owner seeking to effectively use Twitter to promote their business.

Ben Salve's curator insight, August 8, 2015 9:14 AM


Business owners who have recognised the growing effectiveness of marketing their businesses via Twitter, need significant guidance, to be effective in this endeavour. Rather than re-inventing the wheel or proceeding haphazardly by trial and error, learning from those who have the knowledge is a recommended course of action. The information contained in the 10 links in this article, should prove invaluable, for any business owner seeking to effectively use Twitter to promote their business.

Luigi Cangiano's curator insight, August 8, 2015 1:17 PM


Business owners who have recognised the growing effectiveness of marketing their businesses via Twitter, need significant guidance, to be effective in this endeavour. Rather than re-inventing the wheel or proceeding haphazardly by trial and error, learning from those who have the knowledge is a recommended course of action. The information contained in the 10 links in this article, should prove invaluable, for any business owner seeking to effectively use Twitter to promote their business.

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Yale University has the best college library in America - USA TODAY College

Yale University has the best college library in America - USA TODAY College | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Princeton Review names the New Haven, CT school's Sterling Library as #1.
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Research questions about technology use in education in developing countries

Research questions about technology use in education in developing countries | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
let's investigate this systematically ... Back in 2005, I helped put together a 'quick guide to ICT and education challenges and research questions' in developing countries. This list was meant to inform a research program at the time sponsored by the World Bank's infoDev program, but I figured I'd make it public, because the barriers to publishing were so low (copy -> paste -> save -> upload) and in case doing so might be useful to anyone else. While I don't know to what extent others may have actually found this list helpful, I have seen this document referenced over the years in various funding proposals, and by other funding agencies. Over the past week I've (rather surprisingly) heard two separate organizations reference this rather old document in the course of considering some of their research priorities going forward related to investigating possible uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to help meet educational goals in low income and middle countries around the world, and so I wondered how these 50 research questions had held up over the years. Are they still relevant? And: What did we miss, ignore or not understand? The list of research questions to be investigated going forward was a sort of companion document to Knowledge maps: What we know (and what we don't) about ICT use in education in developing countries. It was in many ways a creature of its time and context. The formulation of the research questions identified was in part influenced by some stated interests of the European Commission (which was co-funding some of the work) and I knew that some research questions would resonate with other potential funders at the time (including the World Bank itself) who were interested in related areas (see, for example, the first and last research questions). The list of research questions was thus somewhat idiosynscratic, did not presume to be comprehensive in its treatment of the topic, and was not intended nor meant to imply that certain areas of research interest were 'more important' than others not included on the list. That said, in general the list seems to have held up quite well, and many of the research questions from 2005 continue to resonate in 2015. In some ways, this resonance is unfortunate, as it suggests that we still don't know answers to a lot of very basic questions. Indeed, in some cases we may know as little in 2015 as we knew in 2015, despite the explosion of activity and investment (and rhetoric) in exploring the relevance of technology use in education to help meet a wide variety of challenges faced by education systems, communities, teachers and learners around the world. This is not to imply that we haven't learned anything, of course (an upcoming EduTech blog post will look at two very useful surveys of research findings that have been published in the past year), but that we still have a long way to go. Some comments and observations, with the benefit of hindsight and when looking forward The full list of research questions from 2005 is copied at the bottom of this blog post (here's the original list as published, with explanation and commentary on individual items). Reviewing this list, a few things jump out at me:

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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