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What is the Future of Educational Technology? | EduTechDebate.org

What is the Future of Educational Technology? | EduTechDebate.org | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Over the past 4 years, the Educational Technology Debate had great conversations every month on the major issues in ICT4Edu. From the challenges of 1:1 computing, to the promise of Open Educational Resources, and the reality of MOOCs, we’ve been at the forefront of the major trends facing educators and technologists.


We are now re-starting our discussions with a fresh look at the opportunities and challenges in ICT4D and, we’d like to hear from you.


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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Ebola fear prompts South Korea university to cancel Nigerians' invitation - Reuters

Ebola fear prompts South Korea university to cancel Nigerians' invitation - Reuters | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
BU Today Ebola fear prompts South Korea university to cancel Nigerians' invitation Reuters The Duksung Women's University in Seoul said in a statement the school "politely withdrew" its invitation for three Nigerian students to attend an...
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Girls Who Code and the Importance of STEM

Girls Who Code and the Importance of STEM | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
It’s no secret that the fastest growing jobs in the world are those that require deep educational qualifications and specific skills in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).
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EU Commission "Deliberately" Misunderstands Scientists - ECF InfoZone

EU Commission "Deliberately" Misunderstands Scientists - ECF InfoZone | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

The reply that scientists received from the EU Commission, in response to their critique of the proposed Tobacco Products Directive (TPD), did not address the concerns they had raised, and included factual errors and unsupported assertions. In no way was it an adequate reply to the important questions facing the regulatory authorities of the European Union. The scientists have replied to the letter with another critique, not only reasserting their claims, but also responding to the incorrect implication that they are in the pay of e-cig companies.

 

On January 17, a group of 15 scientists, from several EU and non-EU countries, whose work is in the field of electronic cigarettes, sent a letter jointly to the EU commission (later published in the journal New Scientist, pointing out the mistakes in the impending legislation described in the proposed TPD.


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Social Media Lie Detector Sorts Fact from Rumor : DNews

Social Media Lie Detector Sorts Fact from Rumor : DNews | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
European scientists are developing a system that can debunk online rumors and weed out misinformation. Continue reading →

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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15 Scientists See E-Cig Advantages & Question Bans!

15 Scientists See E-Cig Advantages & Question Bans! | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Fifteen scientists have claimed in an open letter to the European Parliament, European Commission and Council of Ministers that the members who drafted the regulations have misinterpreted the scientific findings of their research into electronic cigarettes.

 

The scientists blasted the proposed regulations which they claim could have disastrous ramifications for the industry and vapers throughout the continent. The letter reads: “If wisely regulated, e-cigarettes have the potential to make cigarettes obsolete and save millions of lives worldwide. Excessive regulation, on the contrary, will [perpetuate] the existing levels of smoking related disease, death and health care costs.”


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Researchers create cloud-based brain for robots

Researchers create cloud-based brain for robots | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

A group of European researchers has released the first version of a cloud computing platform for robots that will help them take advantage of powerful virtual resources. Essentially, they’re treating robots like any other device — desktop, tablet or mobile phone — running web applications, only robots can learn from each other and can do a lot more than just update screen displays.
The project, carried out by a team at ETH Zurich, is called RoboEarth and its linchpin is a cloud software platform called Rapyuta. The way it works is pretty simple at a high level: robots communicate with a cloud-based application platform that carries out computation tasks and connects to a cloud database full of information such as maps, images, language, as well as to other web services. The robots themselves are pretty much hardware terminals equipped with sensors and moving parts but limited on-board processing power or data storage.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Shaun Dewar's curator insight, March 21, 2013 4:46 AM

Robots have been speculated to be the furure for many years now, this artcle informs us that a cloud has been created for robots. The robots are planned to be treated just like any device we use today eg. mobile phones. Robots will certainly be part of the future just a matter of when.

Filocity's curator insight, April 6, 2013 10:50 PM

Nothing to do with document scanning but interesting

 

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Breakthrough imaging technique depicts breast tumors in 3D with great clarity and reduced radiation

Breakthrough imaging technique depicts breast tumors in 3D with great clarity and reduced radiation | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Like cleaning the lenses of a foggy pair of glasses, scientists are now able to use a technique developed by UCLA researchers and their European colleagues to produce three-dimensional images of breast tissue that are two to three times sharper than those made using current CT scanners at hospitals. The technique also uses a lower dose of X-ray radiation than a mammogram.

 

These higher-quality images could allow breast tumors to be detected earlier and with much greater accuracy. One in eight women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime. The most common breast cancer screening method used today is called dual-view digital mammography, but it isn't always successful in identifying tumors, said Jianwei (John) Miao, a UCLA professor of physics and astronomy and researcher with the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA.

 

Recognizing these limitations, the scientists went in a new direction. In collaboration with the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in France and Germany's Ludwig Maximilians University, Miao's international colleagues used a special detection method known as phase contrast tomography to X-ray a human breast from multiple angles. They then applied equally sloped tomography, or EST — a breakthrough computing algorithm developed by Miao's UCLA team that enables high-quality image-reconstruction — to 512 of these images to produce 3D images of the breast at a higher resolution than ever before. The process required less radiation than a mammogram.

 

http://tinyurl.com/8e55vpt


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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How you and I could become nodes in the internet of things | GigaOM Tech News

How you and I could become nodes in the internet of things | GigaOM Tech News | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

 

Ever wonder what the network infrastructure of the future will be? Try looking in the mirror.

 

Some day our bodies — or at least the clothing or accessories that adorn them — could become key network nodes in the internet of things. European researchers think that sensors and transmitters on our bodies can be used to form cooperative ad hoc networks that could be used for group indoor navigation, crowd-motion capture, health monitoring on a massive scale and especially collaborative communications. Last week, French institute CEA-Leti and three French universities have launched the Cormoran project, which aims to explore the use of such cooperative interpersonal networks.

 

The concept of wireless body area networks (WBANs) isn’t a new one. WBANs could be used to sever the cord between patients and their monitoring equipment. Companies like Apple and Heapslylon are exploring the possibility of connected clothes with embedded sensors. We’ve already begun embracing a new era of wearables, such as Google Glass to Fitbit (see disclosure), designed to become extensions of our senses and movements.

 

All of these devices will become key end-points in the internet of things, but what Cormoran proposes to make them pull double duty. Rather than just remain terminuses, they could route bits to and relay data from each other, becoming a distributed ad hoc network that constantly morphs as we move through physical space.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Drones Could Be Used to Find Missing Persons After Natural Disasters

Drones Could Be Used to Find Missing Persons After Natural Disasters | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Researchers at a European university are testing a new way to find victims who may be buried underneath thousands of pounds of rubble. They employed drones to sniff out the data packets emitted by mobile phones.
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Indigenous peoples at forefront of climate change offer lessons on plant biodiversity

Indigenous peoples at forefront of climate change offer lessons on plant biodiversity | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Humans are frequently blamed for deforestation and the destruction of environments, yet there are also examples of peoples and cultures around the world that have learned to manage and conserve the precious resources around them. The Yanesha of the upper Peruvian Amazon and the Tibetans of the Himalayas are two groups of indigenous peoples carrying on traditional ways of life, even in the face of rapid environmental changes. Over the last 40 years, Dr. Jan Salick, senior curator and ethnobotanist with the William L. Brown Center of the Missouri Botanical Garden has worked with these two cultures.

 

She explains how their traditional knowledge and practices hold the key to conserving, managing and even creating new biodiversity in a paper released in the new text, "Biodiversity in Agriculture: Domestication, Evolution, and Sustainability," published by Cambridge University Press.

 

The Yanesha and Tibetans are dramatically different peoples living in radically dissimilar environments, but both cultures utilize and highly value plant biodiversity for their food, shelters, clothing and medicines.

 

"Both cultures use traditional knowledge to create, manage and conserve this biodiversity, and both are learning to adapt to and mitigate the effects of climate change," said Salick. "They have much to teach and to offer the world if we can successfully learn to integrate science and traditional knowledge.


Via Ashish Umre
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