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Environment change threatens indigenous traditional knowledge

Environment change threatens indigenous traditional knowledge | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
The way indigenous cultures around the globe use traditional medicines and pass on knowledge developed over centuries is directly linked to the natural environment, new research has found.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Geography Education
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Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care?

Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care? | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
One reason why geography has languished in the curricula of many American schools is that so few people understand the nature of the discipline or its relevance to our everyday lives. What is geography? What is its unique perspective? What do geographers do? Why is geography important? Why should we teach (and learn) geography in the schools? These are questions that have gone largely unanswered in American education. This brief essay presents an easily taught, understood, and remembered definition of geography.

Via Seth Dixon
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This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.


Tags: education, K12, geography education.

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Richard Lloyd Thomas's curator insight, August 4, 7:46 PM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Gretchen wiseman's curator insight, August 4, 7:50 PM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Linda Denty's curator insight, August 4, 8:56 PM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

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Plagiarism detection software often ineffective - Education Dive

Plagiarism detection software often ineffective - Education Dive | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Studies of Turnitin, SafeAssign, and others have found little improvement in the efficacy of plagiarism detection over the last decade.
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Scholarly vs. Activist Identities: What standards should govern academic engagement in the public sphere?

Scholarly vs. Activist Identities: What standards should govern academic engagement in the public sphere? | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Social media allows scholars to discuss and debate current affairs like never before, but these media can also hinder a productive and thoughtful academic exchange. Brent E. Sasley and Mira Sucharo...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Academics and public engagement

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Developing a framework for teaching open courses

Developing a framework for teaching open courses | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
This post was written jointly with Katia Hildebrandt and also appears on her blog. Recently, we presented at OER15 in Cardiff, Wales, on the topic of developing a framework for open courses. In our...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from iPads in Education
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What Classrooms Can Learn From Informal Learning - TeachThought

What Classrooms Can Learn From Informal Learning - TeachThought | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
I spent more than 5 years in public school classrooms, both urban and suburban, and while I saw a lot of educators working their behinds off and engaging kids in valuable, essential learning, I also saw a lot of kids that were disenchanted by what school had to offer. After years in the public school system, many of the students that need school the worst had been taught one irrevocable truth: learning was not for them. And not just because school was too hard or too easy, but because it was often at odds with their interests and desires.

And then, in just the past few months, I’ve had my eyes opened to the world of schooling that happens beyond the walls of the traditional brick and mortar education. Suddenly, I saw living rooms, parks, co-ops, libraries, churches, and community centers as steady, stimulating learning environments. I saw parents confidently addressing the educational needs of their children without necessarily having the formal training to do so (my good friend, Becky, is among them). I saw how certain learning methods and perspectives could yield the type of student that regularly scores above the national average on an array of standardized tests and feels empowered as a lifelong learner. But what exactly were these families able to do that was so different? And what could we as public educators borrow from these homeschool classrooms–or any non-traditional or informal learning environment–that would be of benefit in our own? Here are the five things that stand out.

Via John Evans
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Elizabeth Walton Coleman's curator insight, August 1, 11:19 PM

These are the things I've learned that the half is never greater than the whole.

Heather Maxon's curator insight, August 2, 6:11 AM

Good article

Hiran Mayee's comment, August 3, 3:07 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UA2_VwJzwug
Rescooped by Nevermore Sithole from Effective Education
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Open Textbook Library

Open Textbook Library | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Open Textbook Library

As an instructor, you want your students to have the best textbooks possible. Unfortunately, not all students can afford the high cost of traditional textbooks.
You can change that!

You can ensure that ALL of your students will have access to your course textbook content. In addition, you can edit the textbooks to fit your courses and best meet the needs of your students.

Open textbooks are real, complete textbooks licensed so teachers and students can freely use, adapt, and distribute the material. Open textbooks can be downloaded for no cost, or printed inexpensively.

This library is a tool to help instructors find affordable, quality textbook solutions. All textbooks in this library are complete and openly licensed.

Via Chuck Hitchcock, Marianela Camacho Alfaro, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Lessons about researching technology-enhanced instruction- by Tony Bates

Lessons about researching technology-enhanced instruction- by Tony Bates | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Research questions about technology use in education in developing countries

Research questions about technology use in education in developing countries | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
let's investigate this systematically ... Back in 2005, I helped put together a 'quick guide to ICT and education challenges and research questions' in developing countries. This list was meant to inform a research program at the time sponsored by the World Bank's infoDev program, but I figured I'd make it public, because the barriers to publishing were so low (copy -> paste -> save -> upload) and in case doing so might be useful to anyone else. While I don't know to what extent others may have actually found this list helpful, I have seen this document referenced over the years in various funding proposals, and by other funding agencies. Over the past week I've (rather surprisingly) heard two separate organizations reference this rather old document in the course of considering some of their research priorities going forward related to investigating possible uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to help meet educational goals in low income and middle countries around the world, and so I wondered how these 50 research questions had held up over the years. Are they still relevant? And: What did we miss, ignore or not understand? The list of research questions to be investigated going forward was a sort of companion document to Knowledge maps: What we know (and what we don't) about ICT use in education in developing countries. It was in many ways a creature of its time and context. The formulation of the research questions identified was in part influenced by some stated interests of the European Commission (which was co-funding some of the work) and I knew that some research questions would resonate with other potential funders at the time (including the World Bank itself) who were interested in related areas (see, for example, the first and last research questions). The list of research questions was thus somewhat idiosynscratic, did not presume to be comprehensive in its treatment of the topic, and was intended meant to imply that certain areas of research interest were 'more important' than others not included on the list. That said, in general the list seems to have held up quite well, and many of the research questions from 2005 continue to resonate in 2015. In some ways, this resonance is unfortunate, as it suggests that we still don't know answers to a lot of very basic questions. Indeed, in some cases we may know as little in 2015 as we knew in 2015, despite the explosion of activity and investment (and rhetoric) in exploring the relevance of technology use in education to help meet a wide variety of challenges faced by education systems, communities, teachers and learners around the world. This is not to imply that we haven't learned anything, of course (an upcoming EduTech blog post will look at two very useful surveys of research findings that have been published in the past year), but that we still have a long way to go. Some comments and observations, with the benefit of hindsight and when looking forward The full list of research questions from 2005 is copied at the bottom of this blog post (here's the original list as published, with explanation and commentary on individual items). Reviewing this list, a few things jump out at me:

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rethinking Education in a Changing World - UNESCO


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Rethinking Education in a Changing World - UNESCO

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Women and Distance Education in Developing Countries: The Challenges


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Information literacy, e-learning and the changing role of the librari…

Lecture given at the iSchool on 13th March as part of the academic libraries module. Focusing on information literacy, digital literacy, ANCIL, e-learning and …
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The Information Literacy User’s Guide: An Open, Online Textbook | Open SUNY Textbooks

The Information Literacy User’s Guide: An Open, Online Textbook | Open SUNY Textbooks | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
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Defining Makerspaces: Part 1 - Renovated Learning

Defining Makerspaces: Part 1 - Renovated Learning | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Recently, I had the unfortunate experience of dealing with criticism.  I was told (not to my face) by a visitor to our school that our library makerspace is not a “real makerspace”.  This same person stated that our woodshop is a “real makerspace” because it has power tools.  She even suggested that I “do some research” on what makerspaces actually are.

Feeling personally insulted aside, what bothers me most about this statement is the concept that some makerspaces are more valid than others and that a makerspace is solely defined by the tools it contains.  I do agree that our woodshop is a makerspace, even though we don’t call it that. Our woodshop is awesome, and I’m so glad that we have a space where students can learn how to use saws, drills and other tools to build awesome projects as part of their curriculum.  Yes, that is a makerspace.

But is my space any less of a makerspace simply because it doesn’t have power tools?  Because it doesn’t have a 3D printer?  Because my students build with LEGOs, K’nex and cardboard?

Via John Evans
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Julie Lindsay's curator insight, June 6, 6:43 PM

I do think the definition of 'makerspace' needs to be very liberal - including the use of digital technologies to create artefacts.

LET Team's curator insight, June 6, 9:19 PM

Stay tuned for our own library maker space...coming soon!