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This column will change your life: how to think about writing

This column will change your life: how to think about writing | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

The key thing to realise, Pinker argues, is that writing is "cognitively unnatural." For almost all human existence, nobody wrote anything; even after that, for millennia, only a tiny elite did so. And it remains an odd way to communicate. You can't see your readers' facial expressions. They can't ask for clarification. Often, you don't know who they are, or how much they know. How to make up for all this?


Pinker's answer builds on the work of two language scholars, Mark Turner and Francis-Noël Thomas, who label their approach "joint attention". Writing is a modern twist on an ancient, species-wide behaviour: drawing someone else's attention to something visible. 


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 7, 1:50 AM

'The idea is to help readers discern something you know they'd be able to see, if only they were looking in the right place,' says Oliver Burkeman...

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'Euthanasia has become fashionable': Ethics expert on the right to die - ChristianToday

'Euthanasia has become fashionable': Ethics expert on the right to die - ChristianToday | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
ChristianToday
'Euthanasia has become fashionable': Ethics expert on the right to die
ChristianToday
There are thought to be at least 15 inmates who have already requested information about euthanasia, De Standaard newspaper reports.
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Research on the association benefits for the agricultural producer market manifestations - EconBiz

Research on the association benefits for the agricultural producer market manifestations - EconBiz | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Hey @dgoldtech, I recommend you: http://t.co/4gW9iUA5By Research on the association benefits for the agricultural producer market manifes...
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Ph.D without thesis, disservice to academics - Nigerian Tribune

Ph.D without thesis, disservice to academics
Nigerian Tribune
There is a difference between 'Ph.D' and 'Doctor of' in a particular field e.g. Ph.D in Education and Doctor of Education.
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PhD researchers run into problems - Deccan Chronicle

PhD researchers run into problems - Deccan Chronicle | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
PhD researchers run into problems Deccan Chronicle Hyderabad: Nearly a 1,000 teachers and students from both Telangana and Andhra Pradesh, who had been pursuing PhD at the Dravidian University have been left in the lurch as their doctoral theses...
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Researchers at Brown University create first wireless, implantable brain-computer interface

Researchers at Brown University create first wireless, implantable brain-computer interface | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Researchers at Brown University have succeeded in creating the first wireless, implantable, rechargeable, long-term brain-computer interface. The wireless BCIs have been implanted in pigs and monkeys for over 13 months without issue, and human subjects are next.

 

A tether limits the mobility of the patient, and also the real-world testing that can be performed by the researchers. Brown’s wireless BCI allows the subject to move freely, dramatically increasing the quantity and quality of data that can be gathered — instead of watching what happens when a monkey moves its arm, scientists can now analyze its brain activity during complex activity, such as foraging or social interaction. Obviously, once the wireless implant is approved for human testing, being able to move freely — rather than strapped to a chair in the lab — would be rather empowering.

 

Inside the device, there’s a li-ion battery, an inductive (wireless) charging loop, a chip that digitizes the signals from your brain, and an antenna for transmitting those neural spikes to a nearby computer. The BCI is connected to a small chip with 100 electrodes protruding from it, which, in this study, was embedded in the somatosensory cortex or motor cortex. These 100 electrodes produce a lot of data, which the BCI transmits at 24Mbps over the 3.2 and 3.8GHz bands to a receiver that is one meter away. The BCI’s battery takes two hours to charge via wireless inductive charging, and then has enough juice to last for six hours of use.


One of the features that the Brown researchers seem most excited about is the device’s power consumption, which is just 100 milliwatts. For a device that might eventually find its way into humans, frugal power consumption is a key factor that will enable all-day, highly mobile usage. Amusingly, though, the research paper notes that the wireless charging does cause significant warming of the device, which was “mitigated by liquid cooling the area with chilled water during the recharge process and did not notably affect the animal’s comfort.” Another important factor is that the researchers were able to extract high-quality, “rich” neural signals from the wireless implant — a good indicator that it will also help human neuroscience, if and when the device is approved.


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Benjamin Johnson's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:36 PM

Let science open the doors for gaming!

 

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Improving Citizen Access to Government Scientific Information | UCSUSA

Improving Citizen Access to Government Scientific Information | UCSUSA | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Lack of access to governmental information has had significant negative consequences for both the environment and human health. This first Lewis M.

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Available now: a guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities

Available now: a guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Following on from the lists of academic tweeters published earlier this month, we have put together a short guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities, available...

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Available now: a guide to using Twitter in university research, teaching, and impact activities

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How Can Public Research Universities Pay for Research ...

How Can Public Research Universities Pay for Research ... | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Three percent of the college population could still go to prestige-brand research universities and liberal arts colleges, which is about the percentage that goes to them now. Everyone else would, in this scenario, get converted ...
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How to Attend a Medical Conference Without Actually Being There.

How to Attend a Medical Conference Without Actually Being There. | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Because of the explosion in the use of social media at conferences, every attendee is potentially their own reporter. Attendees broadcast their thoughts on twitter with a hash tag followed by the name of the conference and the year.


Thus, last year I was able to follow Chest 2012 by simply following “#Chest2012” on twitter. Attendees use social media to discuss presentations in real time giving you clinical pearls, findings of the latest research in pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and thoracic medicine, and even post pictures of slides demonstrating important findings.


By simply following the twitter feed of a particular scientific conference, you can easily learn about the latest research, clinical pearls, even check out pictures of key slides during a presentation.


I have taken this approach to several meetings, even ones that may not necessarily be within my particular field.  For example, while it hasn’t been worthwhile for me to take the time and expense to attend Kidney Week or ASCO, or ACEP, I am interested to know what comes out of these conferences.


Following the tweets from those conferences gives me practical information diluted from a week of scientific sessions.

While these benefits are useful, there’s another significantly more tangible benefit that comes from using social media, particularly while at the conference itself: networking.


Over the past year I have been excited to have made connections through social media with many colleagues around the country. But making those connections through social media is only the first step.


Human beings are after all social creatures. Face to face connections are ultimately more productive and satisfying than anything that we can accomplish online. So at this year’s conference I will be looking to use twitter as a tool help me connect with my colleagues at Chest 2013.


By being active at the meeting and sharing my experiences through social media I’ll surely add to the community of professionals with which I interact.


A lot more at the original source: http://caduceusblog.com/archives/1366


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Boosting literacy development in Nigeria - BusinessDay

Boosting literacy development in Nigeria
BusinessDay
September 8 is globally celebrated as International Literacy Day. It is a day set aside to draw attention to the importance and impact of literacy skills on individuals, communities, and societies.
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Elsevier and the University of Birmingham Launch First Large Scale Investigation Analysing Discourse Used in Interdisciplinary Research

Elsevier and the University of Birmingham Launch First Large Scale Investigation Analysing Discourse Used in Interdisciplinary Research | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

BIRMINGHAM, England, November 6, 2013 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Corpus linguistics analyses applied across selection of Elsevier journal content

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the University of Birmingham, UK, the Times University of the Year in 2013, announce the launch of an Investigation of the Discourse of Interdisciplinary Research (IDRD). It is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (UK).

Research is increasingly bringing together scientists from different fields and this investigation aims to analyse how this development is reflected in the language used in scholarly articles and how trends in the discourse used can support research policy development.

IDRD was launched on 30 August 2013 and will run for two years under the direction of Dr Paul Thompson, Director of the Centre for Corpus Research at The University of Birmingham. The investigation will be based on content published in Elsevier's journal Global Environmental Change, a highly interdisciplinary journal, and a group of selected control Elsevier journals. Corpus linguistics, a relatively new area of analysis for applied linguistic research, will be used to examine the discourse employed in the journals. Elsevier will provide free access to the journals' content allowing for full text mining of the papers published. Elsevier will also provide analytical support and will help contact journal editors, reviewers, and authors for additional qualitative surveys and interviews.

"I am delighted that Elsevier are providing access to the content required for this study, including the complete holdings of Global Environmental Change. This will allow us to conduct corpus linguistics analyses of research articles on a scale never attempted before," said Dr Paul Thompson.

"We are excited and proud to support the University of Birmingham in this investigation. Interdisciplinarity in research is changing the ways in which both scholars and publishers work, and we welcome this initiative to analyze and better understand it," said David Clark, Senior Vice President of life sciences and social sciences journal publishing at Elsevier.

With the results of the investigation both Elsevier and the University of Birmingham's Centre for Corpus Research aim to provide research councils with a fuller understanding of the distinctive features of discourse practices in interdisciplinary research. They hope to be able to deliver insights into the nature of communication between researchers from different disciplines so that interdisciplinary research can be better promoted and managed.


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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, November 7, 2013 1:22 AM

BIRMINGHAM, England, November 6, 2013 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ -- Corpus linguistics analyses applied across selection of Elsevier journal content

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the University of Birmingham, UK, the Times University of the Year in 2013, announce the launch of an Investigation of the Discourse of Interdisciplinary Research (IDRD). It is funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (UK).

Research is increasingly bringing together scientists from different fields and this investigation aims to analyse how this development is reflected in the language used in scholarly articles and how trends in the discourse used can support research policy development.

IDRD was launched on 30 August 2013 and will run for two years under the direction of Dr Paul Thompson, Director of the Centre for Corpus Research at The University of Birmingham. The investigation will be based on content published in Elsevier's journal Global Environmental Change, a highly interdisciplinary journal, and a group of selected control Elsevier journals. Corpus linguistics, a relatively new area of analysis for applied linguistic research, will be used to examine the discourse employed in the journals. Elsevier will provide free access to the journals' content allowing for full text mining of the papers published. Elsevier will also provide analytical support and will help contact journal editors, reviewers, and authors for additional qualitative surveys and interviews.

"I am delighted that Elsevier are providing access to the content required for this study, including the complete holdings of Global Environmental Change. This will allow us to conduct corpus linguistics analyses of research articles on a scale never attempted before," said Dr Paul Thompson.

"We are excited and proud to support the University of Birmingham in this investigation. Interdisciplinarity in research is changing the ways in which both scholars and publishers work, and we welcome this initiative to analyze and better understand it," said David Clark, Senior Vice President of life sciences and social sciences journal publishing at Elsevier.

With the results of the investigation both Elsevier and the University of Birmingham's Centre for Corpus Research aim to provide research councils with a fuller understanding of the distinctive features of discourse practices in interdisciplinary research. They hope to be able to deliver insights into the nature of communication between researchers from different disciplines so that interdisciplinary research can be better promoted and managed.

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Mapping Physician Twitter Networks

Mapping Physician Twitter Networks | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Background: Twitter is becoming an important tool in medicine, but there is little information on Twitter metrics. In order to recommend best practices for information dissemination and diffusion, it is important to first study and analyze the networks.


Objective: This study describes the characteristics of four medical networks, analyzes their theoretical dissemination potential, their actual dissemination, and the propagation and distribution of tweets.
Methods: Open Twitter data was used to characterize four networks: the American Medical Association (AMA), the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and the American College of Physicians (ACP). Data were collected between July 2012 and September 2012. Visualization was used to understand the follower overlap between the groups. Actual flow of the tweets for each group was assessed. Tweets were examined using Topsy, a Twitter data aggregator.


Results: The theoretical information dissemination potential for the groups is large. A collective community is emerging, where large percentages of individuals are following more than one of the groups. The overlap across groups is small, indicating a limited amount of community cohesion and cross-fertilization. The AMA followers’ network is not as active as the other networks. The AMA posted the largest number of tweets while the AAP posted the fewest. The number of retweets for each organization was low indicating dissemination that is far below its potential.


Conclusions: To increase the dissemination potential, medical groups should develop a more cohesive community of shared followers. Tweet content must be engaging to provide a hook for retweeting and reaching potential audience. Next steps call for content analysis, assessment of the behavior and actions of the messengers and the recipients, and a larger-scale study that considers other medical groups using Twitter.



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Mapping Physician Twitter Networks

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Evolving Role of Social Media in Healthcare Sector

Evolving Role of Social Media in Healthcare Sector | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

We all know that technological advances have revolutionized the healthcare sector and social media is rapidly transforming this sector. Because it is cost-effective and an easily accessible platform, a significant amount of healthcare practitioners, doctors, family members, patients and specialists have taken to social media to bring about a more impactful treatment and care. People in the healthcare sector are using social media to find and share information about health plans, medical treatments and doctors. The healthcare sector is a breeding ground for disruption where issues like misinformation, security and confidentiality exists, but social media and other technologies can alter the healthcare experience for the parties involved. Countless processes from management of health records to patient services can be augmented and there is plenty of scope. As it is, Google Glass, nurses equipped with iPads and patients strapping NFC embedded identification tags are already on the scene and are a reality. But the presence of social media can contribute immensely towards organizational transparency, efficiency, treatment efficacy and increased communication.

How Social Media Can Benefit Patients?

•    In certain cases, patients do not have to physically travel to visit a doctor about a cold. They can obtain basic medical advice from professionals within their network. Social media enables faster dissemination of medical information.

•    Social media users are growing increasingly accustomed to sharing personal information online. Users can comment on an article on health to posting a status update. Furthermore, patients are actively engaging with other patients and their family members to exchange notes on ailments, treatments and prescriptions.

•    Niche social networking sites have been developed by patients and their family members which enables them to focus on specific patient communities and diseases. Patients and their family members can access testimonials, reports, forums and other relevant information.

How Social Media Can Benefit Doctors?

•    Incorporation of social media strategy can significantly augment and improve communication, feedback and offer superior service in healthcare.

•    A quartet of hospitals already have a social media presence and 60% of doctors have positively reported that social media has improved quality of healthcare. Using social media, doctors can build brand loyalty and a network of patients who can have better access to healthcare professionals and services.

•    A powerful content management system can empower members to post blogs and articles related to healthcare. These interesting and informative articles and blogs can be shared with millions of people across the world using powerful social medium networking tools like Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

•    Using Google Hangouts, doctors can remain connected with their past patients. This is the most inexpensive and innovative way of using this technology and retaining patients.

•    Through social media, doctors can aim for a more patient-centric model in healthcare with transparency.

•    If doctors and hospitals maintain a proactive social media presence, then they can resolve patient queries with efficacy, leading to patient satisfaction and loyalty. When patients have such access, it can lead to better health outcomes.

Social media platforms present a wealth of opportunities for the healthcare industry. If patients and doctors empower themselves by using technology like social media, then they can steer healthcare sector to another level altogether.



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Link Found Between Food Allergies and Farm Antibiotics

Link Found Between Food Allergies and Farm Antibiotics | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
If you are eating any factory farmed and mass-processed meats, you are not only getting antibiotics, but also many bacteria that are resistant to them.
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Research Associate (Agricultural Economics), Arusha, Tanzania

Research Associate (Agricultural Economics), Arusha, Tanzania | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Tangaza# Research Associate (Agricultural Economics), Arusha, Tanzania http://t.co/tTveAlzLiv
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Grace Mugabe's doctorate questioned - Nehanda Radio

Grace Mugabe's doctorate questioned - Nehanda Radio | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Nehanda Radio
Grace Mugabe's doctorate questioned
Nehanda Radio
Granted, Grace was registered to study for a doctorate in the Sociology department, and her proposal was fast tracked a couple of months ago.
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Why university research?

University research drives scientific and technological advances that address critical global challenges and improve the health and well-being of society. Li...
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Putting China’s “Hacking Army” into Perspective

Putting China’s “Hacking Army” into Perspective | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Great New York Times front-pager on Tuesday finally provides a substantive overview of the comprehensive hacking activities of the Chinese military against all manner of U.S. industries (with an obvious focus on defense).

________________________________________________________

Actually, the title was a bit of soft sell (China’s Army Seen as Tied to Hacking Against U.S.). This unit’s activities have been much discussed within the U.S. national-security community for several years now, so we are far past the “tied to” allegation. It’s clear that Beijing has the People’s Liberation Army conduct widespread cyber- theft all over the world, targeting the U.S. in particular.

One is tempted to label this cyber-warfare, and to declare that bilateral conflict in full swing, but I like to avoid such imprecision in language.

 

What we have here is industrial espionage on a grand scale – pure and simple. Yes, the PLA wants to know how to cause as much infrastructure mischief as possible in the event of a shooting war with the U.S., but let’s not be naive about the extensive and ongoing U.S. efforts to do the same to China (much less our Rubicon-crossing cyber strikes against Iran).

 

That sort of spying and military espionage is nothing new. All that says is that both sides plan to go heavy on cyber warfare in the event of war. It does not prove that cyber is its own warfare domain – as in, constituting genuine war in isolation.

 

As for the industrial espionage, China’s ambitions are magnificently broad. Check out the list of industries targeted, according to the Times:

 

Information technology

Aerospace

Government-related agencies

Satellites and communications

Scientific research and consulting

Transportation

Energy

High-tech electronics

Constructing and manufacturing

Engineering

International organizations

Legal services

Media, advertising, entertainment

NavigationFinancial services

ChemicalsHealth care

Food and agriculture

Metals and mining

Education.

 

Clearly, this is a scope far and beyond thwarting America’s AirSea Battle Concept.



Read more: http://nation.time.com/2013/02/22/putting-chinas-hacking-army-into-perspective/#ixzz2NOCN6p7i


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DOSID's curator insight, March 13, 2013 12:05 AM

While Chinese hackers boast about their exploits online, it’s rare to hear one articulate why he chose to hack for nationalist reasons. The story of Wan Tao, now 41, and his China Eagle Union—which at its height boasted hundreds of members who attacked foreign computer systems with the government’s tacit approval—gives an inside glimpse into the underground world of Chinese hackers: their motivation, exploitation and, in some cases, redemption.

http://world.time.com/2013/02/21/chinas-red-hackers-the-tale-of-one-patriotic-cyberwarrior/

_______________________________________________________

 

A WAR MONGERING New York Times???

Judge for yourself:

"Chinese Army Unit Is Seen as Tied to Hacking Against U.S."

- Feb 18 2013

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/19/technology/chinas-army-is-seen-as-tied-to-hacking-against-us.html?_r=0

 

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NCI delivers science cloud for data-intensive research - ZDNet

NCI delivers science cloud for data-intensive research - ZDNet | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
NCI delivers science cloud for data-intensive research ZDNet However, given the scale and reach of the investigations such as climate change, earth system science, and life sciences research, NCI was tasked with building a high-performance science...
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Open University academics to help improve UK policing | Business Weekly | Technology News | Business news | Cambridge and the East of England

Open University academics to help improve UK policing | Business Weekly | Technology News | Business news | Cambridge and the East of England | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
The Open University Business School (OUBS) in Milton Keynes is working with police forces and agencies across the UK to help them cope with reduced resources and enhance the service they offer the public.
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Researchers successfully eliminate HIV virus from cultured human cells

The Temple University School of Medicine research team's approach looks promising as they work towards a permanent cure and potential for protection against ...
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Videonotes tutorial - this tool allows students to take notes while watching Youtube videos

Videonotes tutorial - this tool allows students to take notes while watching Youtube videos | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Videonotes allows you to paste in any YouTube video and then you can take notes as you watch the video. The notes then become clickable, so you can click on the notes and it immediately goes to that part of the video.

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Peaceland | Séverine Autesserre

Peaceland | Séverine Autesserre | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it
Peaceland - Conflict resolution and the everyday politics of international intervention http://t.co/qKug9XtIkF via @SeverineAR
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Libraries and Information Centres - Their Role in Information Society

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How social media can combat chronic disease

How social media can combat chronic disease | Research Capacity-Building in Africa | Scoop.it

Social media can help combat chronic illness, according to a new eHealth Initiative report.


The report states social media and online communities can enhance health education by promoting healthy eating, active living and wellness--addressing many of the preventable problems that lead to chronic disease, which plagues more than 133 million Americans and contributes to about 75 percent of the country's healthcare spending. 

Social media--including message boards, blogs, microblogs and social networking sites--breaks down the walls of patient-provider communication, improves access to health information and provides a new channel for peer-to-peer communication among healthcare providers, consumers and family members, according to the report. It also helps providers develop meaningful relationships that provide emotional support for patients with chronic conditions, establish communities among caregivers, patients and families, and empowers patients to achieve their objectives with online peer support.


In this webinar, we will examine this trend and discuss options for providers who are entering this market. We will review technology, systems and delivery models. What are the risks/rewards of such a model, and how does it differ from the provider models of the past? What are the factors that will drive an organization to success? Register Now!

The report identified best practices recommendations for implementing wide-spread use of social media within the healthcare industry, including the need to:

Develop multiple functionalities to allow users to exchange nformation at the same time; 

Establish online roles for trained health providers and caregivers to give accurate information;

Provide dynamic privacy controls and use requirements;

Incorporate user-centered designs with relevant, helpful features;

Provide an open, safe environment where users can comfortably share information;

Apply evidence-based behavioral theory to use social networks for peer support and motivation;

Redefine the patients' roles by empowering them with information; and

Leverage long-lasting community ties to sustain user engagement.

However, with little precedence regarding social media in the medical community, the report acknowledges there are challenges to adapting social media as a major tool for information dissemination. Privacy laws and sharing personal information online are a major concern, as well as the quality and validity regarding healthcare information. There's also a digital divide among the elderly and minority populations, the report states.

Many healthcare organizations are taking advantage of social media already.Hospitals across the country are turning to Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Pinterest to recruit patients and their families to serve as advisors, asking for their opinions via questionnaires and surveys on planned improvements in care, new services and even facility names


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